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Social Influence in Customer-Robot Interactions

Hannig, Martin ; Stock-Homburg, Ruth (2023)
Social Influence in Customer-Robot Interactions.
Proceedings of Forty-Second International Conference on Information Systems. Hyderabad (2023)
Conference or Workshop Item, Bibliographie

Abstract

This paper focuses on social influence in customer-robot interactions. Drawing on social impact theory and the computers-are-social-actors (CASA) paradigm, we argue that customers' reluctance to provide information to a service robot decreases when other customers exhibit high information disclosure. The effect of demonstrated information disclosure on customers' reluctance to provide information is enhanced by the application of social norms. The results also show that social influence is stronger in customer-robot interactions than in customer-employee interactions. This article demonstrates the potential of social influence to reduce reluctance towards service robots, which has both theoretical and managerial implications. We extend existing research on the imitation of robot behavior with the imitation of user behavior, and discuss the ethical implications of customers mindlessly following other customers in customer-robot interactions.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Erschienen: 2023
Creators: Hannig, Martin ; Stock-Homburg, Ruth
Type of entry: Bibliographie
Title: Social Influence in Customer-Robot Interactions
Language: English
Date: 2023
Place of Publication: Hyderabad
Event Title: Proceedings of Forty-Second International Conference on Information Systems
Event Location: Hyderabad
Event Dates: 2023
Abstract:

This paper focuses on social influence in customer-robot interactions. Drawing on social impact theory and the computers-are-social-actors (CASA) paradigm, we argue that customers' reluctance to provide information to a service robot decreases when other customers exhibit high information disclosure. The effect of demonstrated information disclosure on customers' reluctance to provide information is enhanced by the application of social norms. The results also show that social influence is stronger in customer-robot interactions than in customer-employee interactions. This article demonstrates the potential of social influence to reduce reluctance towards service robots, which has both theoretical and managerial implications. We extend existing research on the imitation of robot behavior with the imitation of user behavior, and discuss the ethical implications of customers mindlessly following other customers in customer-robot interactions.

Divisions: 01 Department of Law and Economics
01 Department of Law and Economics > Betriebswirtschaftliche Fachgebiete
01 Department of Law and Economics > Betriebswirtschaftliche Fachgebiete > Department of Marketing & Human Resource Management
Date Deposited: 11 Feb 2024 18:54
Last Modified: 11 Feb 2024 18:54
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