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Vibrotactile Force Perception - Absolute and Differential Thresholds and External Influences

Hatzfeld, Christian and Cao, Siran and Kupnik, Mario and Werthschützky, Roland (2016):
Vibrotactile Force Perception - Absolute and Differential Thresholds and External Influences.
PP, In: IEEE Transactions on Haptics, (99), p. 1, ISSN 1939-1412, [Article]

Abstract

Three experiments were carried out to determine absolute and differential thresholds for vibrotactile forces and external influences in the frequency range of 5 to 1000 Hz at the tip of the index finger. Differential thresholds were obtained for reference stimuli of 0.5 N, 0.25N and near the individual threshold. Frequency, temperature, age, fingertip size, and contact force were investigated as parameters in a full-factorial design. Experiments were conducted with at least 27 subjects and a 1up-2down staircase procedure with 3IFC paradigm. We find absolute thresholds ranging from 1.7mN to 19mN with the lowest threshold at 320 Hz. Weber fractions from 18 dB to 41 dB are found near the absolute threshold. For larger references, they range from 4.9 dB to 23 dB. ANOVA finds frequency as significant medium effect for both absolute and differential thresholds. Results imply impact of age on the absolute threshold, but no effect of motor skill, temperature, fingertip size and contact force. Differential thresholds are affected by frequency only, which is attributed to saturation effects of the Pacinian channel. Fingertip size and motor skill are not able to explain effects on thresholds and the interpersonal variance. Results of this work are intended as requirement source for the design of task-specific haptic interfaces.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2016
Creators: Hatzfeld, Christian and Cao, Siran and Kupnik, Mario and Werthschützky, Roland
Title: Vibrotactile Force Perception - Absolute and Differential Thresholds and External Influences
Language: English
Abstract:

Three experiments were carried out to determine absolute and differential thresholds for vibrotactile forces and external influences in the frequency range of 5 to 1000 Hz at the tip of the index finger. Differential thresholds were obtained for reference stimuli of 0.5 N, 0.25N and near the individual threshold. Frequency, temperature, age, fingertip size, and contact force were investigated as parameters in a full-factorial design. Experiments were conducted with at least 27 subjects and a 1up-2down staircase procedure with 3IFC paradigm. We find absolute thresholds ranging from 1.7mN to 19mN with the lowest threshold at 320 Hz. Weber fractions from 18 dB to 41 dB are found near the absolute threshold. For larger references, they range from 4.9 dB to 23 dB. ANOVA finds frequency as significant medium effect for both absolute and differential thresholds. Results imply impact of age on the absolute threshold, but no effect of motor skill, temperature, fingertip size and contact force. Differential thresholds are affected by frequency only, which is attributed to saturation effects of the Pacinian channel. Fingertip size and motor skill are not able to explain effects on thresholds and the interpersonal variance. Results of this work are intended as requirement source for the design of task-specific haptic interfaces.

Journal or Publication Title: IEEE Transactions on Haptics
Volume: PP
Number: 99
Uncontrolled Keywords: Force;Force measurement;Haptic interfaces;Indexes;Kinematics;Manganese;Skin;absolute threshold;differential threshold;influences on haptic perception;vibrotactile force perception
Divisions: 18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology
18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology > Institute for Electromechanical Design
18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology > Institute for Electromechanical Design > Measurement and Sensor Technology
Date Deposited: 02 Aug 2016 08:20
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