TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Motor and Sensor Network Topologies as Translators between Motor Control and Human Locomotion

Schumacher, Christian (2020):
Motor and Sensor Network Topologies as Translators between Motor Control and Human Locomotion.
Darmstadt, Technische Universität,
DOI: 10.25534/tuprints-00011846,
[Ph.D. Thesis]

Abstract

Human locomotion requires a complex interplay of the mechanical, sensor, neural and motor systems of motor control. Still, cyclic locomotion tasks such as walking and running can be described by simple mechanical concepts, as identified by biomechanical Template models. This dissertation asks how the complex motor control system produces simple patterns of human locomotion and aims to identify mechanisms of motor control to bridge the gap between the sophisticated body morphology and the low-dimensional structure of locomotion. Inspired by previous research, this work hypothesises that networks of the motor and sensor systems can provide structural solutions to simplify motor control.

Three studies investigate the role of these networks for generating elementary behaviours of locomotion. Two works evaluate the motor network during steady-state locomotion and the response to unforeseen balance perturbations, while one study addresses sensor networks in dynamic hopping motions.

The first study, a meta-analysis, reviews the specific role of biarticular muscles for multi-joint coordination. The framework of locomotor subfunctions helps to categorise the diverse literature from biomechanics, biology and robotics. Conceptual models indicate that biarticular muscles can sense and act in global leg coordinates (leg length and orientation) instead of joint coordinates if the leg design approximates the human anatomy. Evidence from human experiments shows benefits for coordinating the segmented leg, improving motion economy and controlling angular momentum. While many of these principles provide the potential to enhance robotic system designs, these concepts await further exploitation in robotic hardware.

While the main body of experimental studies focused on steady-state motions, only a limited amount of research comprised unforeseen perturbation scenarios to study biarticular muscles. To fill this gap of knowledge, the second work investigates the role of biarticular muscles to realign the upper-body after postural balance perturbations. A new device is used to produce specific, impulse-like pitch perturbations with only minimal effects on the centre of mass dynamics. Subjects respond with intense reflex activity in biarticular thigh muscles, while monoarticular muscles respond only moderately. This study provides strong evidence that biarticular muscles are preferably used to realign the upper-body.

The final study investigates the function of blended reflex pathways to generate steady-state hopping patterns. A neuromechanical simulation model predicts pathway-specific activation patterns resulting in different motion characteristics: performance, efficiency and safety. These results indicate that elementary compositions in the sensor network can produce task-relevant behaviours. Novel sensor-motor maps visualise the solution space of the predicted hopping patterns to evaluate the specific feedback contributions for generating a repulsive leg function. These maps are compact, united and consistent over changes in body morphology and environment, which suggests a simple learning problem.

In summary, this thesis investigates peripheral networks of motor control, namely networks of muscle and sensory mechanoreceptors, and their function for simplifying the control task of the neural system. The main contribution of this work is the identification of the supporting role of these networks that allows the neural system to exploit the fundamental dynamics of locomotion. These results stimulate future research on human experiments and robotic demonstrators to validate the conceptual theory presented here.

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2020
Creators: Schumacher, Christian
Title: Motor and Sensor Network Topologies as Translators between Motor Control and Human Locomotion
Language: English
Abstract:

Human locomotion requires a complex interplay of the mechanical, sensor, neural and motor systems of motor control. Still, cyclic locomotion tasks such as walking and running can be described by simple mechanical concepts, as identified by biomechanical Template models. This dissertation asks how the complex motor control system produces simple patterns of human locomotion and aims to identify mechanisms of motor control to bridge the gap between the sophisticated body morphology and the low-dimensional structure of locomotion. Inspired by previous research, this work hypothesises that networks of the motor and sensor systems can provide structural solutions to simplify motor control.

Three studies investigate the role of these networks for generating elementary behaviours of locomotion. Two works evaluate the motor network during steady-state locomotion and the response to unforeseen balance perturbations, while one study addresses sensor networks in dynamic hopping motions.

The first study, a meta-analysis, reviews the specific role of biarticular muscles for multi-joint coordination. The framework of locomotor subfunctions helps to categorise the diverse literature from biomechanics, biology and robotics. Conceptual models indicate that biarticular muscles can sense and act in global leg coordinates (leg length and orientation) instead of joint coordinates if the leg design approximates the human anatomy. Evidence from human experiments shows benefits for coordinating the segmented leg, improving motion economy and controlling angular momentum. While many of these principles provide the potential to enhance robotic system designs, these concepts await further exploitation in robotic hardware.

While the main body of experimental studies focused on steady-state motions, only a limited amount of research comprised unforeseen perturbation scenarios to study biarticular muscles. To fill this gap of knowledge, the second work investigates the role of biarticular muscles to realign the upper-body after postural balance perturbations. A new device is used to produce specific, impulse-like pitch perturbations with only minimal effects on the centre of mass dynamics. Subjects respond with intense reflex activity in biarticular thigh muscles, while monoarticular muscles respond only moderately. This study provides strong evidence that biarticular muscles are preferably used to realign the upper-body.

The final study investigates the function of blended reflex pathways to generate steady-state hopping patterns. A neuromechanical simulation model predicts pathway-specific activation patterns resulting in different motion characteristics: performance, efficiency and safety. These results indicate that elementary compositions in the sensor network can produce task-relevant behaviours. Novel sensor-motor maps visualise the solution space of the predicted hopping patterns to evaluate the specific feedback contributions for generating a repulsive leg function. These maps are compact, united and consistent over changes in body morphology and environment, which suggests a simple learning problem.

In summary, this thesis investigates peripheral networks of motor control, namely networks of muscle and sensory mechanoreceptors, and their function for simplifying the control task of the neural system. The main contribution of this work is the identification of the supporting role of these networks that allows the neural system to exploit the fundamental dynamics of locomotion. These results stimulate future research on human experiments and robotic demonstrators to validate the conceptual theory presented here.

Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Divisions: 03 Department of Human Sciences
03 Department of Human Sciences > Institut für Sportwissenschaft
03 Department of Human Sciences > Institut für Sportwissenschaft > Sportbiomechanik
Date Deposited: 06 Aug 2020 12:04
DOI: 10.25534/tuprints-00011846
Official URL: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/11846
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-118463
Referees: Seyfarth, Prof. Dr. Andre and Ijspeert, Prof. Dr. Auke Jan
Alternative Abstract:
Alternative abstract Language
Die menschliche Fortbewegung erfordert ein komplexes Zusammenspiel von mechanischen, sensorischen, neuronalen und motorischen Systemen der motorischen Kontrolle. Trotz dieser Komplexität, lassen sich zyklische Bewegungen wie Gehen und Laufen durch einfache mechanische Konzepte abbilden, die in biomechanischen Templatemodellen beschreiben werden. Diese Dissertation untersucht, wie die komplizierten Prozesse der motorischen Kontrolle simple Bewegungsmuster zur menschlichen Fortbewegung erzeugen. Dafür werden Mechanismen der motorischen Kontrolle untersucht, um die Lücke zwischen der komplexen Körpermorphologie und der niedrigdimensionalen Struktur der Fortbewegung zu schließen. Basierend auf vorheriger Forschung wird in dieser Arbeit die Hypothese aufgestellt, dass Netzwerke der motorischen und sensorischen Systeme strukturelle Lösungen liefern, die dazu beitragen können das motorische Kontrollproblem zu vereinfachen. Drei Studien untersuchen die Rolle dieser Netzwerke in der Erzeugung elementarer Bewegungsmuster. Zwei Arbeiten evaluieren das motorische Netzwerk bei stationären Bewegungen und unvorhergesehenen Gleichgewichtsstörungen. Die dritte Studie untersucht Sensornetzwerke in dynamischen Sprungbewegungen. Die erste Studie, eine Metaanalyse, führt die Forschung zur spezifischen Rolle von zweigelenkigen Muskeln in der Koordination mehrerer Segmente zusammen. Das Konzept der locomotor subfunctions hilft die Literatur aus Biomechanik, Biologie und Robotik zu kategorisieren. Templatemodelle deuten darauf hin, dass zweigelenkige Muskeln bei einer menschen-ähnlichen Beingeometrie in globalen Beinkoordinaten (Beinlänge und -ausrichtung) agieren, anstatt auf einzelne Gelenke zu wirken. Zweigelenkige Muskeln vereinfachen die Koordination des segmentierten Beins, erzeugen effizientere Bewegungen und regulieren den Drehimpuls der Segemente, wie Experimente zeigen. Viele dieser Prinzipien offenbaren Verbesserungspotentiale für die Anwendung in robotischen Systemen, jedoch werden diese Konzepte bis dato nur selten genutzt. Während der Großteil der experimentellen Studien stationäre Bewegungen untersucht, befassen sich nur wenige Studien mit unvorhergesehenen Störungen, um zweigelenkige Muskeln zu erforschen. Um diese Lücke zu schließen, untersucht die zweite Studie dieser Arbeit die Reaktion zweigelenkiger Muskeln auf Störungen der Oberkörperbalance. Mit Hilfe eines neuen Systems werden starke und impulsartige Störungen der Oberkörperhaltung mit minimalen Auswirkungen auf die Schwerpunktdynamik erzeugt. Alle Probanden reagieren mit intensiven Reflexen in den zweigelenkigen Oberschenkelmuskeln, während eingelenkige Muskeln nur mäßige Reaktionen zeigen. Diese Studie liefert starke Belege für die wichtige Rolle von zweigelenkigen Oberschenkelmuskeln zur Kontrolle der Oberkörperhaltung. Die letzte Studie untersucht die Funktion gemischter Reflexsignale zur Erzeugung von stationären Hüpfbewegungen. Ein neuromechanisches Simulationsmodell erzeugt signalspezifische Aktivierungsmuster, die zu unterschiedlich ausgeprägten Bewegungsformen in Bezug auf Leistung, Effizienz und Sicherheit führen. Diese Ergebnisse deuten darauf hin, dass elementare Verschaltungen von Rezeptoren aufgabenrelevantes Verhalten hervorrufen können. Neuartige sensor-motor maps visualisieren den Lösungsraum der generierten Sprungmuster, um die Beiträge der verschiedenen Reflexsignale zur Erzeugung einer abdrückenden Beinfunktion zu bewerten. Diese Karten sind kompakt, einheitlich und konsistent in Bezug auf Änderungen der Körpermorphologie und -umgebung, was das Erlernen einer solchen Topologie stark vereinfacht. Zusammenfassend untersucht diese Dissertation periphere Netzwerke der motorischen Kontrolle, nämlich Netzwerke von Muskeln und Mechanorezeptoren, und deren Funktion zur Vereinfachung der Kontrollaufgabe des neuronalen Systems. Der Hauptbeitrag dieser Arbeit ist die Identifizierung der unterstützenden Rolle solcher Netzwerke, die es dem neuronalen System ermöglichen, die grundlegende Templatedynamik der Fortbewegung auszunutzen. Diese Ergebnisse regt zukünftige Forschung durch menschlichen Experimente und robotische Demonstratoren an, um das hier vorgestellte konzeptionelle Verständnis zu validieren.German
Export:
Suche nach Titel in: TUfind oder in Google
Send an inquiry Send an inquiry

Options (only for editors)
Show editorial Details Show editorial Details