TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Extension of the Application Potential of Wheeled Mobile Driving Simulators to Uneven Grounds

Zöller, Chris Alexander (2019):
Extension of the Application Potential of Wheeled Mobile Driving Simulators to Uneven Grounds.
Darmstadt, Technische Universität, [Online-Edition: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/9116],
[Ph.D. Thesis]

Abstract

Driving simulators are an important element of vehicle development, since the design of driver assistance systems in particular requires the investigation of the driver-vehicle interaction. In the future, an even greater application potential is to be expected with regard to automated driving, since, for example, handover strategies can be investigated in a secure environment. However, today's driving simulator concepts have reached a limit with regard to the achievable quality of motion simulation. Especially urban driving scenarios require a range of motion that is not economically viable with the sled systems applied in current high-end systems. One way out of this limitation is provided by wheeled mobile driving simulators, which generate the demanded accelerations through tire forces. This enables an application on different driving surfaces, which allows flexible adaptation of the movement area to the requirements of the scenario. However, due to the contact between tire and driving surface, unevenness induces vibrations into the system which disturb the immersion of the subject. The known previous research on wheeled mobile driving simulators gathered in literature neglected this aspect and postulated a sufficient driving surface quality. However, it is unclear what sufficient means in this context. In addition, the flexibility advantage of the concept may be significantly limited by the requirement of a high quality surface. Thus, this work aims at quantifying the required driving surface quality and the development and evaluation of approaches for the reduction of disturbances induced by unevenness. First, an analysis of the current development state of the driving simulator at FZD, which includes a purely tire-sprung system with solid rubber tires, is conducted. This analysis shows that driving surface qualities with a maximum height deviation of 0.01 mm over a length of 4 m (so-called depth gauge) are required to use a driving simulator of this configuration without deteriorating the immersion of the subject. This quality is not achievable with asphalt surfaces, which offer the highest application potential for WMDS. The minimum achievable depth gauge amounts to 2 mm. Thereupon, an active compensation of the driving surface-induced vibrations with the Hexapod, which is already available in simulators, is investigated. The active approach increases the tolerable depth gauge by a factor of 4 compared to the passive tire-sprung system. Nevertheless, it is still only 3 % of the target value. Especially the high dead time of the hexapod as well as the low damping and the parameter fluctuations of the tire limit the potential of the concept. Therefore, the potential of implementing an additional suspension in combination with the active approach is investigated. In order to achieve a low natural frequency, which is advantageous in terms of vibration isolation, a kinematics is developed that reduces the suspension movements of the omnidirectional motion platform by support forces. In addition, the motion control of the driving simulator is adapted in order to adjust the wheel force distribution to the demands of the suspension. These measures reduce the disturbances caused by suspension movements to values below the perception threshold up to a horizontal acceleration of 4.5 m/s². The simulation of an urban driving scenario with a multibody model shows that this covers the majority of the occurring accelerations and that within more than 99% of the simulation time the disturbance motions remain below the perception threshold. With pneumatic tires, the acceleration range with ideal support can be increased to 5.4 m/s². With regard to the required driving surface quality, this allows an increase of the acceptable depth gauge to 0.8 mm, which corresponds to an improvement of almost two orders of magnitude compared to the initial situation. Nevertheless, the value is slightly below the minimum of 2 mm achievable with asphalt surfaces. However, the determined value is only required to remain below the perception threshold with the disturbance vibrations. As vibration in vehicles is not uncommon, the negative effects on the immersion could possibly be lower, allowing a slight exceeding of the threshold. Future subject studies must examine this aspect in more detail.

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2019
Creators: Zöller, Chris Alexander
Title: Extension of the Application Potential of Wheeled Mobile Driving Simulators to Uneven Grounds
Language: English
Abstract:

Driving simulators are an important element of vehicle development, since the design of driver assistance systems in particular requires the investigation of the driver-vehicle interaction. In the future, an even greater application potential is to be expected with regard to automated driving, since, for example, handover strategies can be investigated in a secure environment. However, today's driving simulator concepts have reached a limit with regard to the achievable quality of motion simulation. Especially urban driving scenarios require a range of motion that is not economically viable with the sled systems applied in current high-end systems. One way out of this limitation is provided by wheeled mobile driving simulators, which generate the demanded accelerations through tire forces. This enables an application on different driving surfaces, which allows flexible adaptation of the movement area to the requirements of the scenario. However, due to the contact between tire and driving surface, unevenness induces vibrations into the system which disturb the immersion of the subject. The known previous research on wheeled mobile driving simulators gathered in literature neglected this aspect and postulated a sufficient driving surface quality. However, it is unclear what sufficient means in this context. In addition, the flexibility advantage of the concept may be significantly limited by the requirement of a high quality surface. Thus, this work aims at quantifying the required driving surface quality and the development and evaluation of approaches for the reduction of disturbances induced by unevenness. First, an analysis of the current development state of the driving simulator at FZD, which includes a purely tire-sprung system with solid rubber tires, is conducted. This analysis shows that driving surface qualities with a maximum height deviation of 0.01 mm over a length of 4 m (so-called depth gauge) are required to use a driving simulator of this configuration without deteriorating the immersion of the subject. This quality is not achievable with asphalt surfaces, which offer the highest application potential for WMDS. The minimum achievable depth gauge amounts to 2 mm. Thereupon, an active compensation of the driving surface-induced vibrations with the Hexapod, which is already available in simulators, is investigated. The active approach increases the tolerable depth gauge by a factor of 4 compared to the passive tire-sprung system. Nevertheless, it is still only 3 % of the target value. Especially the high dead time of the hexapod as well as the low damping and the parameter fluctuations of the tire limit the potential of the concept. Therefore, the potential of implementing an additional suspension in combination with the active approach is investigated. In order to achieve a low natural frequency, which is advantageous in terms of vibration isolation, a kinematics is developed that reduces the suspension movements of the omnidirectional motion platform by support forces. In addition, the motion control of the driving simulator is adapted in order to adjust the wheel force distribution to the demands of the suspension. These measures reduce the disturbances caused by suspension movements to values below the perception threshold up to a horizontal acceleration of 4.5 m/s². The simulation of an urban driving scenario with a multibody model shows that this covers the majority of the occurring accelerations and that within more than 99% of the simulation time the disturbance motions remain below the perception threshold. With pneumatic tires, the acceleration range with ideal support can be increased to 5.4 m/s². With regard to the required driving surface quality, this allows an increase of the acceptable depth gauge to 0.8 mm, which corresponds to an improvement of almost two orders of magnitude compared to the initial situation. Nevertheless, the value is slightly below the minimum of 2 mm achievable with asphalt surfaces. However, the determined value is only required to remain below the perception threshold with the disturbance vibrations. As vibration in vehicles is not uncommon, the negative effects on the immersion could possibly be lower, allowing a slight exceeding of the threshold. Future subject studies must examine this aspect in more detail.

Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Divisions: 16 Department of Mechanical Engineering
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Institute of Automotive Engineering (FZD)
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Institute of Automotive Engineering (FZD) > Vehicle Dynamics
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Institute of Automotive Engineering (FZD) > Test Methods
Date Deposited: 20 Oct 2019 19:55
Official URL: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/9116
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-91164
Referees: Winner, Prof. Dr. Hermann and Prokop, Prof. Dr. Günther
Refereed / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 17 September 2019
Alternative Abstract:
Alternative abstract Language
Fahrsimulatoren stellen bereits heute einen wichtigen Bestandteil der Fahrzeugentwicklung dar, da insbesondere die Auslegung von Fahrerassistenzsystemen die Untersuchung der Fahrer-Fahrzeug-Interaktion erfordert. Zukünftig ist im Hinblick auf das automatisierte Fahren ein noch größeres Anwendungspotential zu erwarten, da bspw. Übergabestrategien in einer sicheren Umgebung untersucht werden können. Heutige Fahrsimulatorkonzepte haben jedoch eine Grenze hinsichtlich der erreichbaren Güte der Bewegungssimulation erreicht. Speziell urbane Fahrszenarien erfordern einen Bewegungsraum, der mit den bei High-End-Systemen verwendeten Schlittensystemen nicht mehr wirtschaftlich darstellbar ist. Einen Ausweg aus dieser Limitierung stellen selbstfahrende Fahrsimulatoren dar, die die geforderten Beschleunigungen durch Reifenkräfte erzeugen. Dadurch ist eine Verwendung auf verschiedenen Fahrflächen möglich, wodurch sich der Bewegungsraum flexibel an die Anforderungen des zu simulierenden Szenarios anpassen lässt. Aufgrund des Reifen-Fahrbahn-Kontakts dieses Simulatorkonzepts werden durch Unebenheiten jedoch Schwingungen in das System eingeleitet, die die Immersion des Probanden stören. Die im Rahmen einer Recherche ermittelte Forschung zu selbstfahrenden Simulatoren vernachlässigte diesen Aspekt und setzte eine ausreichend ebene Fahrfläche voraus. Unklar ist jedoch, was in diesem Zusammenhang ausreichend bedeutet. Zudem wird der Flexibilitätsvorteil des Konzepts durch die Anforderung einer hohen Qualität der Fahrfläche eventuell deutlich eingeschränkt. Aus diesem Grund werden in dieser Arbeit zum einen die notwendige Fahrflächenqualität quantifiziert und zum anderen Ansätze zur Reduzierung der Störungen durch die Fahrbahn entwickelt und bewertet. Zunächst wird eine Analyse des aktuellen Entwicklungsstadiums des Fahrsimulators von FZD vorgenommen, welches ein rein reifengefedertes System mit Vollgummi-Reifen umfasst. Diese Analyse zeigt, dass Fahrbahnqualitäten mit einer maximalen Höhenabweichung von 0,01 mm auf einer Länge von 4 m (sog. Stichmaß) zulässig sind, um einen Fahrsimulator dieser Konfiguration ohne Einschränkung der Immersion des Probanden zu nutzen. Diese Qualität ist mit Asphaltflächen, die für WMDS das größte Anwendungspotential aufweisen, nicht erreichbar. Diese erreichen minimale Stichmaße von 2 mm. Daraufhin wird als Verbesserungsansatz eine aktive Kompensation der fahrbahnerregten Schwingungen mit dem in Simulatoren ohnehin vorhandenen Hexapod entwickelt und untersucht. Durch den aktiven Ansatz wird das zulässige Stichmaß gegenüber dem passiven reifengefederten System um den Faktor 4 erhöht, liegt aber dennoch bei nur 3 % Zielwerts. Insbesondere die Totzeit des Hexapods und die geringe Dämpfung sowie die Parameterschwankungen der Reifen schränken das Potential des Konzepts ein. Aus diesem Grund wird das Potential der Implementierung einer zusätzlichen Federung in Kombination mit dem aktiven Ansatz untersucht. Um eine niedrige Eigenfrequenz zu erreichen, die im Hinblick auf Schwingungsisolation vorteilhaft ist, wird eine Kinematik entwickelt, die durch Stützkräfte die Fahrwerksbewegungen der omnidirektionalen Bewegungsplattform reduziert. Zudem erfolgt eine Anpassung der Ansteuerung des Fahrsimulators, um mithilfe einer auf das Fahrwerk angepassten Kraftverteilung das Potential der Kinematik möglichst weit auszuschöpfen. Durch diese Maßnahmen werden die durch Fahrwerksbewegungen bedingten Störungen bis zu einer Horizontalbeschleunigung von 4.5 m/s² auf Werte unterhalb der Wahrnehmungsschwelle reduziert. Die Simulation eines Stadtfahrszenarios mit einem Mehrkörpermodell zeigt, dass dies den Großteil der auftretenden Beschleunigungen abdeckt und mehr als 99 % der Simulationszeit keine Störbewegungen oberhalb der Wahrnehmungsschwelle auftreten. Mit Luftreifen lässt sich der Beschleunigungsbereich mit idealer Abstützung auf 5.4 m/s² steigern. Hinsichtlich der erforderlichen Fahrbahnqualität lässt sich dadurch eine Erhöhung des akzeptablen Stichmaßes auf 0,8 mm erreichen, was einer Verbesserung von fast zwei Größenordnungen gegenüber der Ausgangslage entspricht. Dennoch ist der Wert etwas geringer als der mit Asphaltflächen erreichbare Wert von 2 mm. Der ermittelte Wert ist jedoch nur erforderlich, um mit den Störvibrationen vollständig unterhalb der Wahrnehmungsschwelle zu bleiben. Da Vibrationen in Pkw jedoch nicht ungewöhnlich sind, könnten die negativen Auswirkungen auf die Immersion möglicherweise geringer sein, sodass eine leichte Überschreitung der Wahrnehmungsschwelle zulässig sein könnte. Zukünftige Probandenuntersuchungen müssen diesen Aspekt näher untersuchen.German
Export:
Suche nach Titel in: TUfind oder in Google

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

View Item View Item