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On functions of cholinesterases during embryonic development

Paraoanu, Laura E. ; Steinert, G. ; Klaczinski, J. ; Becker-Roeck, Michaela ; Bytyqi, Afrim H. ; Layer, Paul G. :
On functions of cholinesterases during embryonic development.
In: Journal of molecular neuroscience, 30 (1-2) pp. 201-204.
[Artikel], (2006)

Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract)

Expression of cholinesterase (ChE) activity during phases of embryonic development is a general phenomenon in embryonic tissues. To elucidate the role(s) of ChEs during embryonic development, one line of research followed the assumption of a primitive muscarinic system involved in morphogenesis (Hohmann et al., 1995). This means that ChE functioning during development fits into the classical cholinergic neurotransmitter system: acetylcholine (ACh), as a signal, binds to ACh receptors and then is degraded by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as the terminating enzyme. However, this is just one of the possible mechanisms. The other line of research was driven by evidence for noncholinergic functions of ChE proteins (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase [BChE]). There is accumulating data that other sites on AChE could exert nonclassical roles related to cell differentiation, neurite outgrowth, and adhesion.

Typ des Eintrags: Artikel
Erschienen: 2006
Autor(en): Paraoanu, Laura E. ; Steinert, G. ; Klaczinski, J. ; Becker-Roeck, Michaela ; Bytyqi, Afrim H. ; Layer, Paul G.
Titel: On functions of cholinesterases during embryonic development
Sprache: Englisch
Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract):

Expression of cholinesterase (ChE) activity during phases of embryonic development is a general phenomenon in embryonic tissues. To elucidate the role(s) of ChEs during embryonic development, one line of research followed the assumption of a primitive muscarinic system involved in morphogenesis (Hohmann et al., 1995). This means that ChE functioning during development fits into the classical cholinergic neurotransmitter system: acetylcholine (ACh), as a signal, binds to ACh receptors and then is degraded by acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as the terminating enzyme. However, this is just one of the possible mechanisms. The other line of research was driven by evidence for noncholinergic functions of ChE proteins (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase [BChE]). There is accumulating data that other sites on AChE could exert nonclassical roles related to cell differentiation, neurite outgrowth, and adhesion.

Titel der Zeitschrift, Zeitung oder Schriftenreihe: Journal of molecular neuroscience
Band: 30
(Heft-)Nummer: 1-2
Fachbereich(e)/-gebiet(e): Fachbereich Biologie, Biology
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Fachbereich Biologie, Biology > Entwicklungsbiologie und Neurogenetik, Developmental Biology and Neurogenetics
Hinterlegungsdatum: 20 Nov 2008 08:24
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