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Lamina formation in the Mongolian gerbil retina (Meriones unguiculatus)

Bytyqi, Afrim H. ; Layer, Paul G. :
Lamina formation in the Mongolian gerbil retina (Meriones unguiculatus).
In: Anatomy & embryology, 209 (3) pp. 217-226.
[Artikel], (2005)

Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract)

Retinae of nocturnal rodents, such as mice and rats, are almost exclusively rod-dominated. The gerbil, in contrast, shows active periods during day and night and uses both rod- and cone-based vision. However, its retina has not been studied in detail, except for one developmental study analysing its prenatal period (Wikler et al. 1989). Here, the formation of the laminar structure of the gerbil retina was studied from birth until late adult stages. At birth, the retina consisted of a wide neuroblastic layer, with 30% of cells still dividing, a rate decreasing to nearly zero by P6. Shortly after birth, segregation of a ganglion cell layer began. All retinal layers reached their final size around P20, as determined from DAPI-stained cryosections. Muller glial cells developed their typical structure from P1 onwards, e.g. announcing an outer plexiform layer (OPL) at P5, as analysed by the Ret-G7 and glutamine synthetase antibodies. The analyses of the inner retina were performed by antibodies to calretinin (CR) and calbindin (CB). CR is expressed in ganglion cells followed by amacrine cells from P1 onwards; their processes formed four subbands in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and appeared sequentially after P5 until P20. CB stained a subtype of horizontal cells with their processes into the OPL from P14 onwards. The rod-specific antibody rho4D2 announced photoreceptors at P4, showing signs of outer segments from P10 onwards. The study shows that the formation of all retinal layers in the gerbil occurs postnatally. This and the fact that the gerbil retina is not exclusively rod-dominated could render the gerbil a valuable model for in vitro studies of retinogenesis in rodents.

Typ des Eintrags: Artikel
Erschienen: 2005
Autor(en): Bytyqi, Afrim H. ; Layer, Paul G.
Titel: Lamina formation in the Mongolian gerbil retina (Meriones unguiculatus)
Sprache: Englisch
Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract):

Retinae of nocturnal rodents, such as mice and rats, are almost exclusively rod-dominated. The gerbil, in contrast, shows active periods during day and night and uses both rod- and cone-based vision. However, its retina has not been studied in detail, except for one developmental study analysing its prenatal period (Wikler et al. 1989). Here, the formation of the laminar structure of the gerbil retina was studied from birth until late adult stages. At birth, the retina consisted of a wide neuroblastic layer, with 30% of cells still dividing, a rate decreasing to nearly zero by P6. Shortly after birth, segregation of a ganglion cell layer began. All retinal layers reached their final size around P20, as determined from DAPI-stained cryosections. Muller glial cells developed their typical structure from P1 onwards, e.g. announcing an outer plexiform layer (OPL) at P5, as analysed by the Ret-G7 and glutamine synthetase antibodies. The analyses of the inner retina were performed by antibodies to calretinin (CR) and calbindin (CB). CR is expressed in ganglion cells followed by amacrine cells from P1 onwards; their processes formed four subbands in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and appeared sequentially after P5 until P20. CB stained a subtype of horizontal cells with their processes into the OPL from P14 onwards. The rod-specific antibody rho4D2 announced photoreceptors at P4, showing signs of outer segments from P10 onwards. The study shows that the formation of all retinal layers in the gerbil occurs postnatally. This and the fact that the gerbil retina is not exclusively rod-dominated could render the gerbil a valuable model for in vitro studies of retinogenesis in rodents.

Titel der Zeitschrift, Zeitung oder Schriftenreihe: Anatomy & embryology
Band: 209
(Heft-)Nummer: 3
Fachbereich(e)/-gebiet(e): Fachbereich Biologie, Biology
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Fachbereich Biologie, Biology > Entwicklungsbiologie und Neurogenetik, Developmental Biology and Neurogenetics
Hinterlegungsdatum: 20 Nov 2008 08:20
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