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Sb-Doped SnO2 Hollow Spheres Offering Micro- and Nanoporosity in Fuel Cell Electrode Structures

Suffner, Jens ; Kaserer, Sebastian ; Hahn, Horst ; Roth, Christina ; Ettingshausen, Frank (2011):
Sb-Doped SnO2 Hollow Spheres Offering Micro- and Nanoporosity in Fuel Cell Electrode Structures.
In: Advanced Energy Materials, 1 (4), pp. 648-654. Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, ISSN 16146832,
[Article]

Abstract

Sb-doped SnO2 (ATO) is used as an alternative support material to replace carbon in the highly corrosive environment of a fuel cell cathode. Two ATO powders with different morphologies are decorated with Pt nanoparticles and afterwards used as the cathode catalyst. The commercial ATO powder exhibits crystallites in the nanometer range, while the home-made ATO powder, which was synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis, consists of polycrystalline hollow spheres. The spheres have diameters in the micrometer range and are composed of individual nanocrystallites. The unusual morphology of the home-made ATO offers nano- and microporosity at the same time and opens up new possibilities for the controlled design of electrode structures in low-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Both materials are characterized by XRD, SEM, and TEM and tested in a single cell set-up. While almost no current is gained from the membrane electrode assembly with the commercial ATO support, the cell with the home-made ATO achieves a mediocre performance. This higher activity, however, is obtained with approximately half the Pt content compared to the catalyst with the commercial support. The different behaviours of both ATO powders can therefore mainly be attributed to differences in the specific support morphology.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2011
Creators: Suffner, Jens ; Kaserer, Sebastian ; Hahn, Horst ; Roth, Christina ; Ettingshausen, Frank
Title: Sb-Doped SnO2 Hollow Spheres Offering Micro- and Nanoporosity in Fuel Cell Electrode Structures
Language: English
Abstract:

Sb-doped SnO2 (ATO) is used as an alternative support material to replace carbon in the highly corrosive environment of a fuel cell cathode. Two ATO powders with different morphologies are decorated with Pt nanoparticles and afterwards used as the cathode catalyst. The commercial ATO powder exhibits crystallites in the nanometer range, while the home-made ATO powder, which was synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis, consists of polycrystalline hollow spheres. The spheres have diameters in the micrometer range and are composed of individual nanocrystallites. The unusual morphology of the home-made ATO offers nano- and microporosity at the same time and opens up new possibilities for the controlled design of electrode structures in low-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Both materials are characterized by XRD, SEM, and TEM and tested in a single cell set-up. While almost no current is gained from the membrane electrode assembly with the commercial ATO support, the cell with the home-made ATO achieves a mediocre performance. This higher activity, however, is obtained with approximately half the Pt content compared to the catalyst with the commercial support. The different behaviours of both ATO powders can therefore mainly be attributed to differences in the specific support morphology.

Journal or Publication Title: Advanced Energy Materials
Journal volume: 1
Number: 4
Publisher: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA
Uncontrolled Keywords: electrode structures, hollow spheres, SnO2,support morphology, ultrasonic spray pyrolysis, fuel cells
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Erneuerbare Energien
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Joint Research Laboratory Nanomaterials
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
Date Deposited: 12 Mar 2014 13:25
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/aenm.201100077
Identification Number: doi:10.1002/aenm.201100077
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