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From Digital-Real to Real-Digital: Challenging Established Sequences of Design to Materialisation through Digital Recombination

Eschenbach, Max Benjamin ; Tessmann, Oliver
eds.: Soolep, Jüri ; Ojari, Andres ; Tammet, Tiina (2023)
From Digital-Real to Real-Digital: Challenging Established Sequences of Design to Materialisation through Digital Recombination.
Innovation and Digital Reality Conference. Tallinn, EE (6. September 2022)
Conference or Workshop Item, Bibliographie

Abstract

Computational design and digital fabrication have become widely adapted in architectural research as well as in the contemporary design and construction practice. Seamless digital process chains enabled us to design, optimise and build complex non-standard structures. However, current design and planning processes are still focused on a linear notion of material use: components are digitally designed, engineered and subsequently materialised through digital-real process chains. Despite their highly optimised nature, savings resulting from consuming fewer raw materials may be diminished or even eliminated completely by the use of energy-intensive fabrication processes, complex assembly procedures and what can be called over-in-dividualisation that largely inhibits reuse. Recently, these predominant design and construction logics based on mass customi-sation have been challenged by the evolution of combinatorial as well as discrete design and modelling paradigms. These methods rely more on modularisation and discrete parts and thus can also be utilised to recom-bine existing components. Computational tools enable us to design and build structures from highly heterogeneous materials, even reusing materials formerly considered waste, like scrap or rubble. We define these procedures as real-digital process chains since they depart from the real, already materia-lised components of our built environment and proceed to recombine them in a digital manner. We address the growing problem of resource scarcity by proposing a computational framework targeting the reuse of building components through digitisation, sorting, categorisation and finally recombination. By linking design exploration with state-of-the-art computation, we aim at overcoming the thinking barrier associated with a real-digital design process departing from existing components: The transition to a circular economy is not merely a technical problem to be solved but rather a socioeconomic and cultural endeavour to be explored from a design point of view.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Erschienen: 2023
Editors: Soolep, Jüri ; Ojari, Andres ; Tammet, Tiina
Creators: Eschenbach, Max Benjamin ; Tessmann, Oliver
Type of entry: Bibliographie
Title: From Digital-Real to Real-Digital: Challenging Established Sequences of Design to Materialisation through Digital Recombination
Language: English
Date: 25 August 2023
Place of Publication: Tallinn, EE
Publisher: Estonian Academy of Arts, Faculty of Architecture
Series: Proceedings / Estonian Academy of Arts, Faculty of Architecture
Series Volume: 11/12.2023, Pt. II
Event Title: Innovation and Digital Reality Conference
Event Location: Tallinn, EE
Event Dates: 6. September 2022
URL / URN: https://www.artun.ee/en/proceedings-11-12-2023-faculty-of-ar...
Corresponding Links:
Abstract:

Computational design and digital fabrication have become widely adapted in architectural research as well as in the contemporary design and construction practice. Seamless digital process chains enabled us to design, optimise and build complex non-standard structures. However, current design and planning processes are still focused on a linear notion of material use: components are digitally designed, engineered and subsequently materialised through digital-real process chains. Despite their highly optimised nature, savings resulting from consuming fewer raw materials may be diminished or even eliminated completely by the use of energy-intensive fabrication processes, complex assembly procedures and what can be called over-in-dividualisation that largely inhibits reuse. Recently, these predominant design and construction logics based on mass customi-sation have been challenged by the evolution of combinatorial as well as discrete design and modelling paradigms. These methods rely more on modularisation and discrete parts and thus can also be utilised to recom-bine existing components. Computational tools enable us to design and build structures from highly heterogeneous materials, even reusing materials formerly considered waste, like scrap or rubble. We define these procedures as real-digital process chains since they depart from the real, already materia-lised components of our built environment and proceed to recombine them in a digital manner. We address the growing problem of resource scarcity by proposing a computational framework targeting the reuse of building components through digitisation, sorting, categorisation and finally recombination. By linking design exploration with state-of-the-art computation, we aim at overcoming the thinking barrier associated with a real-digital design process departing from existing components: The transition to a circular economy is not merely a technical problem to be solved but rather a socioeconomic and cultural endeavour to be explored from a design point of view.

Uncontrolled Keywords: circular economy, combinatorial design, computational design, design, discrete design, architecture, discrete architecture, circular architecture, circular design, combinatorial optimization,
Additional Information:

The publication has been supported by Cultural Endowment of Estonia, Estonian Ministry of Culture and Nordplus

Divisions: 15 Department of Architecture
15 Department of Architecture > Fachgruppe B: Gestalten und Darstellen
15 Department of Architecture > Fachgruppe B: Gestalten und Darstellen > Digital Design
Date Deposited: 31 Aug 2023 07:02
Last Modified: 31 Aug 2023 07:02
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