TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Measuring Multimodal Accessibility through Urban Spatial Configurations: Case Studies of three cities in the Rhein-Main Agglomeration

Pandit, Lakshya (2023)
Measuring Multimodal Accessibility through Urban Spatial Configurations: Case Studies of three cities in the Rhein-Main Agglomeration.
Technische Universität Darmstadt
doi: 10.26083/tuprints-00023637
Ph.D. Thesis, Primary publication, Publisher's Version

Abstract

This research investigates the relationship between multimodal accessibility and the spatial configuration of urban areas. The built environment of a city and its urban areas, including its streets, building layout, and open spaces, has a significant influence on its ability to provide an accessible environment for people’s mobility. By studying the spatial characteristics of an urban area (such as city centres, transit areas and residential neighbourhoods), we can better understand how the built environment impacts accessibility and overall mobility in cities. For this purpose, the study is based within the urban agglomeration of Rhein-Main region in Germany, where cities have a polycentral system and the common objective of planning for an environment-friendly mobility region is prioritized. The research aims to identify parameters which connect and integrate different aspects of accessibility, through different modes, using a topological approach to bridge the gap between theory and practice in urban studies. The parameters cater to the principles of inclusive urban design for streets and variables which influence travel demand and trip generation. The parametric spatial assessment showcases how different urban areas performed based on the selected five aspects of accessibility: connectivity, intelligibility, closeness, directness and spatial freedom. Analysing the street network through the identified parameters corresponding to the aspects (including connectivity of street network, access to public transport, Space Syntax attributes assessing access to direct routes and ease of navigation, and ease of movement) narrows down the potential area for improvement in the cities. A pilot study was conducted in Darmstadt, a city in the agglomeration, for the initial spatial assessment. After the pilot study, urban areas in the cities of Frankfurt am Main and Offenbach am Main were selected for further study and inter-city comparison. The results reveal that different urban areas other than the city centres can have a better access to multimodal services, and that certain urban areas in a small city can outperform those in a big city on different aspects of accessibility. The objective characteristics of the urban areas from the spatial assessment were further compared with the subjective evaluation (via public survey) of the people (n=248) living in the agglomeration, which helps in understanding the mobility culture. The research outcomes confirm the difference between the objective and subjective perspectives, via ranking of urban areas based on their multimodal accessibility characteristics. This was more prevalent in urban areas showing low accessibility characteristics objectively. For instance, the city centre in Darmstadt and the transit areas in Frankfurt and Darmstadt remained on top of the urban area ranking hierarchy, both objectively and subjectively. In contrast, the urban areas showing low accessibility characteristics objectively i.e. the residential area in Offenbach am Main and the city centres in Frankfurt am Main and Offenbach am Main, varied in their subjective ranking. Overall, the residential areas in the three cities ranked lower subjectively.

In addition, the dissertation addresses how collaborative projects with city planning authorities can effectively disseminate the results of urban studies. For instance, the road-closure experiment on Frankfurt’s Mainkai riverfront was used as an opportunity to examine the potential of Mainkai street for cycling (via spatial analysis), which supported the implementation of a new dedicated bicycle pathway. The outcomes of the spatial analysis have been used in the dissertation to address certain future urban development plans of the cities and its impact on the accessibility characteristics (e.g. implementation of new streets and its impact on intelligibility, identification of movement restriction in future residential densification projects and more). Furthermore, the study identifies and clusters urban areas based on similar multimodal accessibility characteristics. This approach helps in identifying common development needs and apply targeted measures to improve a large number of urban areas in future research. The dissertation explores and lays a ground work to understand multimodal accessibility by measuring it through spatial analysis, and contributes to the domain of accessibility planning, i.e. planning for people and places.

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2023
Creators: Pandit, Lakshya
Type of entry: Primary publication
Title: Measuring Multimodal Accessibility through Urban Spatial Configurations: Case Studies of three cities in the Rhein-Main Agglomeration
Language: English
Referees: Knöll, Prof. Dr. Martin ; Lanzendorf, Prof. Dr. Martin
Date: 2023
Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Collation: 307 Seiten
Refereed: 22 March 2023
DOI: 10.26083/tuprints-00023637
URL / URN: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/23637
Abstract:

This research investigates the relationship between multimodal accessibility and the spatial configuration of urban areas. The built environment of a city and its urban areas, including its streets, building layout, and open spaces, has a significant influence on its ability to provide an accessible environment for people’s mobility. By studying the spatial characteristics of an urban area (such as city centres, transit areas and residential neighbourhoods), we can better understand how the built environment impacts accessibility and overall mobility in cities. For this purpose, the study is based within the urban agglomeration of Rhein-Main region in Germany, where cities have a polycentral system and the common objective of planning for an environment-friendly mobility region is prioritized. The research aims to identify parameters which connect and integrate different aspects of accessibility, through different modes, using a topological approach to bridge the gap between theory and practice in urban studies. The parameters cater to the principles of inclusive urban design for streets and variables which influence travel demand and trip generation. The parametric spatial assessment showcases how different urban areas performed based on the selected five aspects of accessibility: connectivity, intelligibility, closeness, directness and spatial freedom. Analysing the street network through the identified parameters corresponding to the aspects (including connectivity of street network, access to public transport, Space Syntax attributes assessing access to direct routes and ease of navigation, and ease of movement) narrows down the potential area for improvement in the cities. A pilot study was conducted in Darmstadt, a city in the agglomeration, for the initial spatial assessment. After the pilot study, urban areas in the cities of Frankfurt am Main and Offenbach am Main were selected for further study and inter-city comparison. The results reveal that different urban areas other than the city centres can have a better access to multimodal services, and that certain urban areas in a small city can outperform those in a big city on different aspects of accessibility. The objective characteristics of the urban areas from the spatial assessment were further compared with the subjective evaluation (via public survey) of the people (n=248) living in the agglomeration, which helps in understanding the mobility culture. The research outcomes confirm the difference between the objective and subjective perspectives, via ranking of urban areas based on their multimodal accessibility characteristics. This was more prevalent in urban areas showing low accessibility characteristics objectively. For instance, the city centre in Darmstadt and the transit areas in Frankfurt and Darmstadt remained on top of the urban area ranking hierarchy, both objectively and subjectively. In contrast, the urban areas showing low accessibility characteristics objectively i.e. the residential area in Offenbach am Main and the city centres in Frankfurt am Main and Offenbach am Main, varied in their subjective ranking. Overall, the residential areas in the three cities ranked lower subjectively.

In addition, the dissertation addresses how collaborative projects with city planning authorities can effectively disseminate the results of urban studies. For instance, the road-closure experiment on Frankfurt’s Mainkai riverfront was used as an opportunity to examine the potential of Mainkai street for cycling (via spatial analysis), which supported the implementation of a new dedicated bicycle pathway. The outcomes of the spatial analysis have been used in the dissertation to address certain future urban development plans of the cities and its impact on the accessibility characteristics (e.g. implementation of new streets and its impact on intelligibility, identification of movement restriction in future residential densification projects and more). Furthermore, the study identifies and clusters urban areas based on similar multimodal accessibility characteristics. This approach helps in identifying common development needs and apply targeted measures to improve a large number of urban areas in future research. The dissertation explores and lays a ground work to understand multimodal accessibility by measuring it through spatial analysis, and contributes to the domain of accessibility planning, i.e. planning for people and places.

Alternative Abstract:
Alternative abstract Language

In dieser Forschungsarbeit wird die Beziehung zwischen multimodaler Zugänglichkeit und der räumlichen Konfiguration von Stadtgebieten untersucht. Die bebaute Umwelt einer Stadt und ihrer städtischen Gebiete, einschließlich der Straßen, der Anordnung der Gebäude und der Freiflächen, hat einen erheblichen Einfluss auf die Fähigkeit, eine zugängliche Umgebung für die Mobilität der Menschen zu schaffen. Durch die Untersuchung der räumlichen Merkmale eines Stadtgebiets (z. B. Stadtzentren, Transitbereiche und Wohnviertel) können wir besser verstehen, wie sich die bebaute Umwelt auf die Zugänglichkeit und die allgemeine Mobilität in Städten auswirkt. Zu diesem Zweck wird die Studie im Ballungsraum Rhein-Main in Deutschland durchgeführt, wo die Städte ein polyzentrales System haben und das gemeinsame Ziel der Planung einer umweltfreundlichen Mobilitätsregion im Vordergrund steht. Die Forschung zielt darauf ab, Parameter zu identifizieren, die verschiedene Aspekte der Zugänglichkeit über verschiedene Verkehrsträger miteinander verbinden und integrieren, wobei ein topologischer Ansatz verwendet wird, um die Lücke zwischen Theorie und Praxis in der Stadtforschung zu schließen. Die Parameter entsprechen den Grundsätzen der integrativen Stadtgestaltung für Straßen und Variablen, die die Reisenachfrage und die Reiseerzeugung beeinflussen. Die parametrische Raumbewertung zeigt, wie verschiedene städtische Gebiete auf der Grundlage der fünf ausgewählten Aspekte der Zugänglichkeit abschneiden: Konnektivität, Verständlichkeit, Nähe, Direktheit und räumliche Freiheit. Die Analyse des Straßennetzes anhand der identifizierten Parameter, die den Aspekten entsprechen (einschließlich der Konnektivität des Straßennetzes, des Zugangs zum öffentlichen Verkehr, der Attribute der Raumsyntax, die den Zugang zu direkten Routen und die Leichtigkeit der Navigation bewerten, und der Bewegungsfreiheit), grenzt die potenziellen Bereiche für Verbesserungen in den Städten ein. Für die erste räumliche Bewertung wurde eine Pilotstudie in Darmstadt, einer Stadt in der Agglomeration, durchgeführt. Nach der Pilotstudie wurden Stadtgebiete in den Städten Frankfurt am Main und Offenbach am Main für weitere Untersuchungen und einen Städtevergleich ausgewählt. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass verschiedene städtische Gebiete außerhalb der Stadtzentren einen besseren Zugang zu multimodalen Diensten haben können und dass bestimmte städtische Gebiete in einer Kleinstadt die Gebiete in einer Großstadt in Bezug auf verschiedene Aspekte der Zugänglichkeit übertreffen können. Die objektiven Merkmale der städtischen Gebiete aus der räumlichen Bewertung wurden ferner mit der subjektiven Bewertung (über eine öffentliche Umfrage) der in der Agglomeration lebenden Menschen (n=248) verglichen, was zum Verständnis der Mobilitätskultur beiträgt. Die Forschungsergebnisse bestätigen den Unterschied zwischen der objektiven und der subjektiven Perspektive durch die Einstufung der städtischen Gebiete auf der Grundlage ihrer multimodalen Zugänglichkeitsmerkmale. Dies gilt vor allem für Stadtgebiete, die objektiv gesehen eine geringe Zugänglichkeit aufweisen. So standen beispielsweise das Stadtzentrum von Darmstadt und die Transitbereiche in Frankfurt und Darmstadt sowohl objektiv als auch subjektiv an der Spitze der Rangfolge der städtischen Gebiete. Im Gegensatz dazu wiesen die Stadtgebiete, die objektiv niedrige Zugänglichkeitsmerkmale aufwiesen, d. h. das Wohngebiet in Offenbach am Main und die Stadtzentren in Frankfurt am Main und Offenbach am Main, in ihrer subjektiven Rangfolge Unterschiede auf. Insgesamt schnitten die Wohngebiete in den drei Städten subjektiv schlechter ab.

Darüber hinaus befasst sich die Dissertation mit der Frage, wie Kooperationsprojekte mit Stadtplanungsämtern die Ergebnisse städtebaulicher Studien effektiv verbreiten können. So wurde beispielsweise das Straßensperrungsexperiment am Frankfurter Mainkai als Gelegenheit genutzt, um das Potenzial der Mainkai-Straße für den Radverkehr zu untersuchen (mittels räumlicher Analyse), was die Einrichtung eines neuen Radweges unterstützte. Die Ergebnisse der räumlichen Analyse wurden in der Dissertation verwendet, um bestimmte künftige Stadtentwicklungspläne der Städte und ihre Auswirkungen auf die Zugänglichkeitsmerkmale zu untersuchen (z. B. Umsetzung neuer Straßen und ihre Auswirkungen auf die Verständlichkeit, Identifizierung von Bewegungseinschränkungen bei künftigen Wohnverdichtungsprojekten und mehr). Darüber hinaus identifiziert und gruppiert die Studie städtische Gebiete auf der Grundlage ähnlicher multimodaler Zugänglichkeitsmerkmale. Dieser Ansatz hilft bei der Identifizierung gemeinsamer Entwicklungsbedürfnisse und bei der Anwendung gezielter Maßnahmen zur Verbesserung einer großen Anzahl von Stadtgebieten in der zukünftigen Forschung. Die Dissertation erforscht und legt den Grundstein für das Verständnis multimodaler Zugänglichkeit durch deren Messung mittels räumlicher Analyse und leistet einen Beitrag zum Bereich der Zugänglichkeitsplanung, d. h. der Planung für Menschen und Orte.

German
Status: Publisher's Version
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-236372
Classification DDC: 600 Technology, medicine, applied sciences > 620 Engineering and machine engineering
Divisions: 15 Department of Architecture
15 Department of Architecture > Fachgruppe E: Stadtplanung
15 Department of Architecture > Fachgruppe E: Stadtplanung > Entwerfen und Stadtplanung
Date Deposited: 06 Jun 2023 12:05
Last Modified: 07 Jun 2023 04:59
PPN:
Referees: Knöll, Prof. Dr. Martin ; Lanzendorf, Prof. Dr. Martin
Refereed / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 22 March 2023
Export:
Suche nach Titel in: TUfind oder in Google
Send an inquiry Send an inquiry

Options (only for editors)
Show editorial Details Show editorial Details