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Recovery of release cloud from laser shock-loaded graphite and hydrocarbon targets: in search of diamonds

Schuster, A. K. ; Voigt, K. ; Klemmed, B. ; Hartley, N. J. ; Lütgert, J. ; Zhang, M. ; Bähtz, C. ; Benad, A. ; Brabetz, C. ; Cowan, T. ; Döppner, T. ; Erb, D. J. ; Eychmüller, A. ; Facsko, S. ; Falcone, R. W. ; Fletcher, L. B. ; Frydrych, S. ; Ganzenmüller, G. C. ; Gericke, D. O. ; Glenzer, S. H. ; Grenzer, J. ; Helbig, U. ; Hiermaier, S. ; Hübner, R. ; Laso Garcia, A. ; Lee, H. J. ; MacDonald, M. J. ; McBride, E. E. ; Neumayer, P. ; Pak, A. ; Pelka, A. ; Prencipe, I. ; Prosvetov, A. ; Rack, A. ; Ravasio, A. ; Redmer, R. ; Reemts, D. ; Rödel, M. ; Schoelmerich, M. ; Schumacher, D. ; Tomut, M. ; Turner, S. J. ; Saunders, A. M. ; Sun, P. ; Vorberger, J. ; Zettl, A. ; Kraus, D. (2022)
Recovery of release cloud from laser shock-loaded graphite and hydrocarbon targets: in search of diamonds.
In: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, 2022, 56 (2)
doi: 10.26083/tuprints-00022988
Article, Secondary publication, Publisher's Version

Abstract

This work presents first insights into the dynamics of free-surface release clouds from dynamically compressed polystyrene and pyrolytic graphite at pressures up to 200 GPa, where they transform into diamond or lonsdaleite, respectively. These ejecta clouds are released into either vacuum or various types of catcher systems, and are monitored with high-speed recordings (frame rates up to 10 MHz). Molecular dynamics simulations are used to give insights to the rate of diamond preservation throughout the free expansion and the catcher impact process, highlighting the challenges of diamond retrieval. Raman spectroscopy data show graphitic signatures on a catcher plate confirming that the shock-compressed PS is transformed. First electron microscopy analyses of solid catcher plates yield an outstanding number of different spherical-like objects in the size range between ten(s) up to hundreds of nanometres, which are one type of two potential diamond candidates identified. The origin of some objects can unambiguously be assigned, while the history of others remains speculative.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2022
Creators: Schuster, A. K. ; Voigt, K. ; Klemmed, B. ; Hartley, N. J. ; Lütgert, J. ; Zhang, M. ; Bähtz, C. ; Benad, A. ; Brabetz, C. ; Cowan, T. ; Döppner, T. ; Erb, D. J. ; Eychmüller, A. ; Facsko, S. ; Falcone, R. W. ; Fletcher, L. B. ; Frydrych, S. ; Ganzenmüller, G. C. ; Gericke, D. O. ; Glenzer, S. H. ; Grenzer, J. ; Helbig, U. ; Hiermaier, S. ; Hübner, R. ; Laso Garcia, A. ; Lee, H. J. ; MacDonald, M. J. ; McBride, E. E. ; Neumayer, P. ; Pak, A. ; Pelka, A. ; Prencipe, I. ; Prosvetov, A. ; Rack, A. ; Ravasio, A. ; Redmer, R. ; Reemts, D. ; Rödel, M. ; Schoelmerich, M. ; Schumacher, D. ; Tomut, M. ; Turner, S. J. ; Saunders, A. M. ; Sun, P. ; Vorberger, J. ; Zettl, A. ; Kraus, D.
Type of entry: Secondary publication
Title: Recovery of release cloud from laser shock-loaded graphite and hydrocarbon targets: in search of diamonds
Language: English
Date: 2022
Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Year of primary publication: 2022
Publisher: IOP Publishing
Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics
Volume of the journal: 56
Issue Number: 2
Collation: 19 Seiten
DOI: 10.26083/tuprints-00022988
URL / URN: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/22988
Corresponding Links:
Origin: Secondary publication DeepGreen
Abstract:

This work presents first insights into the dynamics of free-surface release clouds from dynamically compressed polystyrene and pyrolytic graphite at pressures up to 200 GPa, where they transform into diamond or lonsdaleite, respectively. These ejecta clouds are released into either vacuum or various types of catcher systems, and are monitored with high-speed recordings (frame rates up to 10 MHz). Molecular dynamics simulations are used to give insights to the rate of diamond preservation throughout the free expansion and the catcher impact process, highlighting the challenges of diamond retrieval. Raman spectroscopy data show graphitic signatures on a catcher plate confirming that the shock-compressed PS is transformed. First electron microscopy analyses of solid catcher plates yield an outstanding number of different spherical-like objects in the size range between ten(s) up to hundreds of nanometres, which are one type of two potential diamond candidates identified. The origin of some objects can unambiguously be assigned, while the history of others remains speculative.

Uncontrolled Keywords: recovery, nanodiamonds, laser-induced shock compression, high energy density
Status: Publisher's Version
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-229885
Classification DDC: 500 Science and mathematics > 530 Physics
Divisions: 05 Department of Physics
05 Department of Physics > Institute of Nuclear Physics
Date Deposited: 19 Dec 2022 12:26
Last Modified: 21 Dec 2022 11:09
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