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Matrix-specific mechanism of Fe ion release from laser-generated 3D-printable nanoparticle-polymer composites and their protein adsorption properties

Li, Yaya ; Rehbock, Christoph ; Nachev, Milen ; Stamm, Jacqueline ; Sures, Bernd ; Blaeser, Andreas ; Barcikowski, Stephan (2020)
Matrix-specific mechanism of Fe ion release from laser-generated 3D-printable nanoparticle-polymer composites and their protein adsorption properties.
In: Nanotechnology, 31 (40)
doi: 10.1088/1361-6528/ab94da
Article, Bibliographie

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Abstract

Nanocomposites have been widely applied in medical device fabrication and tissue-engineering applications. In this context, the release of metal ions as well as protein adsorption capacity are hypothesized to be two key processes directing nanocomposite-cell interactions. The objective of this study is to understand the polymer-matrix effects on ion release kinetics and their relations with protein adsorption. Laser ablation in macromolecule solutions was employed for synthesizing Au and Fe nanoparticle-loaded nanocomposites based on thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and alginate. Confocal microscopy revealed a three-dimensional homogeneous dispersion of laser-generated nanoparticles in the polymer. The physicochemical properties revealed a pronounced dependence upon embedding of Fe and Au nanoparticles in both polymer matrices. Interestingly, the total Fe ion concentration released from alginate gels under static conditions decreased with increasing mass loadings, a phenomenon only found in the Fe-alginate system and not in the Cu/Zn-alginate and Fe-TPU control system (where the effects were proportioonal to the nanoparticle load). A detailed mechanistic examination of iron the ion release process revealed that it is probably not the redox potential of metals and diffusion of metal ions alone, but also the solubility of nano-metal oxides and affinity of metal ions for alginate that lead to the special release behaviors of iron ions from alginate gels. The amount of adsorbed bovine serum albumin (BSA) and collagen I on the surface of both the alginate and TPU composites was significantly increased in contrast to the unloaded control polymers and could be correlated with the concentration of released Fe ions and the porosity of composites, but was independent of the global surface charge. Interestingly, these effects were already highly pronounced at minute loadings with Fe nanoparticles down to 200 ppm. Moreover, the laser-generated Fe or Au nanoparticle-loaded alginate composites were shown to be a suitable bioink for 3D printing. These findings are potentially relevant for ion-sensitive bio-responses in cell differentiation, endothelisation, vascularisation, or wound healing.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2020
Creators: Li, Yaya ; Rehbock, Christoph ; Nachev, Milen ; Stamm, Jacqueline ; Sures, Bernd ; Blaeser, Andreas ; Barcikowski, Stephan
Type of entry: Bibliographie
Title: Matrix-specific mechanism of Fe ion release from laser-generated 3D-printable nanoparticle-polymer composites and their protein adsorption properties
Language: English
Date: July 2020
Publisher: IOP Publishing
Journal or Publication Title: Nanotechnology
Volume of the journal: 31
Issue Number: 40
DOI: 10.1088/1361-6528/ab94da
Corresponding Links:
Abstract:

Nanocomposites have been widely applied in medical device fabrication and tissue-engineering applications. In this context, the release of metal ions as well as protein adsorption capacity are hypothesized to be two key processes directing nanocomposite-cell interactions. The objective of this study is to understand the polymer-matrix effects on ion release kinetics and their relations with protein adsorption. Laser ablation in macromolecule solutions was employed for synthesizing Au and Fe nanoparticle-loaded nanocomposites based on thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) and alginate. Confocal microscopy revealed a three-dimensional homogeneous dispersion of laser-generated nanoparticles in the polymer. The physicochemical properties revealed a pronounced dependence upon embedding of Fe and Au nanoparticles in both polymer matrices. Interestingly, the total Fe ion concentration released from alginate gels under static conditions decreased with increasing mass loadings, a phenomenon only found in the Fe-alginate system and not in the Cu/Zn-alginate and Fe-TPU control system (where the effects were proportioonal to the nanoparticle load). A detailed mechanistic examination of iron the ion release process revealed that it is probably not the redox potential of metals and diffusion of metal ions alone, but also the solubility of nano-metal oxides and affinity of metal ions for alginate that lead to the special release behaviors of iron ions from alginate gels. The amount of adsorbed bovine serum albumin (BSA) and collagen I on the surface of both the alginate and TPU composites was significantly increased in contrast to the unloaded control polymers and could be correlated with the concentration of released Fe ions and the porosity of composites, but was independent of the global surface charge. Interestingly, these effects were already highly pronounced at minute loadings with Fe nanoparticles down to 200 ppm. Moreover, the laser-generated Fe or Au nanoparticle-loaded alginate composites were shown to be a suitable bioink for 3D printing. These findings are potentially relevant for ion-sensitive bio-responses in cell differentiation, endothelisation, vascularisation, or wound healing.

Additional Information:

Artikel-ID 405703

Divisions: 16 Department of Mechanical Engineering
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Institute of Printing Science and Technology (IDD)
Interdisziplinäre Forschungsprojekte
Interdisziplinäre Forschungsprojekte > Centre for Synthetic Biology
Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2022 07:03
Last Modified: 10 Jan 2024 08:10
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