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Design Considerations for Decentralized Reputation Systems: A White Paper from the Rebooting the Web of Trust IV Design Workshop

Champion de Crespigny, Angus ; Khovratovich, Dmitry ; Blondeau, Florent ; Sok, Klara ; Honigman, Philippe ; Alexopoulos, Nikolaos ; Petitcolas, Fabien ; Conway, Shaun (2017)
Design Considerations for Decentralized Reputation Systems: A White Paper from the Rebooting the Web of Trust IV Design Workshop.
4th Rebooting the Web of Trust Workshop. Paris, France (19.-21.04.2017)
Conference or Workshop Item, Bibliographie

Abstract

Reputation systems provide an effective way to build a web of trust on the Internet. They consider the history of interactions between peers to establish a measure for a reputation that can itself be used to support a trust decision. Decentralised reputations systems (DRS) rely on a decentralised computer architecture and a distributed ledger to store and maintain reputation information, so that no single entity has control over that information.

While there have been numerous analyses of how reputation may be used, there has to date been no systematic definition of the various aspects that should be considered when a reputation system is being designed. By defining these design considerations, we can come to a consensus about what is and is not important in a system. We can discuss the different ways in which they can be built and we can conduct further research and analysis into specific factors in a structured way.

We identified ten design considerations for all decentralized reputations should address. These are:

- Context: What is the reputation value applicable to? What can be understood about an entity by seeing their reputation value(s)?

- Participation: How is participation defined? Who can and can’t participate? Who can and can’t have a reputation value assigned?

- User consent: Is consent required by a user to issue claims or a reputation value against the user? Is consent required to reveal claims or a reputation value of a user?

- Confidentiality: To meet consent requirements, how is data that calculates a reputation value kept private? Can it be derived?

- Value generation: How is the reputation value calculated or generated? How are claims contributing to the reputation value normalized?

- Performance: How does the system manage the performance and behavior of the users? How does it manage the performance of the network for speed, reliability, and data integrity? How do users have confidence in this?

- Sustainability: How does the system stay relevant over time?

- Claim lifecycle: How are claims valued over time? Can they be revoked and under what conditions?

- Resilience: How does the system protect against attacks that reduce the integrity of the reputation value?

- Legal: What is the legal environment in which the system sits? Are there potential violations of ‘natural’ law?

The rest of this paper will further define these considerations and populate each with examples and considerations for their design. We will continue to develop and refine to establish language standards for discussing reputation systems.

We have not defined what is and isn’t required for each consideration, as particular implementations may have differing reasons for each. However, we anticipate that best practices for these considerations will be topics for future analysis.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Erschienen: 2017
Creators: Champion de Crespigny, Angus ; Khovratovich, Dmitry ; Blondeau, Florent ; Sok, Klara ; Honigman, Philippe ; Alexopoulos, Nikolaos ; Petitcolas, Fabien ; Conway, Shaun
Type of entry: Bibliographie
Title: Design Considerations for Decentralized Reputation Systems: A White Paper from the Rebooting the Web of Trust IV Design Workshop
Language: English
Date: 6 June 2017
Event Title: 4th Rebooting the Web of Trust Workshop
Event Location: Paris, France
Event Dates: 19.-21.04.2017
Corresponding Links:
Abstract:

Reputation systems provide an effective way to build a web of trust on the Internet. They consider the history of interactions between peers to establish a measure for a reputation that can itself be used to support a trust decision. Decentralised reputations systems (DRS) rely on a decentralised computer architecture and a distributed ledger to store and maintain reputation information, so that no single entity has control over that information.

While there have been numerous analyses of how reputation may be used, there has to date been no systematic definition of the various aspects that should be considered when a reputation system is being designed. By defining these design considerations, we can come to a consensus about what is and is not important in a system. We can discuss the different ways in which they can be built and we can conduct further research and analysis into specific factors in a structured way.

We identified ten design considerations for all decentralized reputations should address. These are:

- Context: What is the reputation value applicable to? What can be understood about an entity by seeing their reputation value(s)?

- Participation: How is participation defined? Who can and can’t participate? Who can and can’t have a reputation value assigned?

- User consent: Is consent required by a user to issue claims or a reputation value against the user? Is consent required to reveal claims or a reputation value of a user?

- Confidentiality: To meet consent requirements, how is data that calculates a reputation value kept private? Can it be derived?

- Value generation: How is the reputation value calculated or generated? How are claims contributing to the reputation value normalized?

- Performance: How does the system manage the performance and behavior of the users? How does it manage the performance of the network for speed, reliability, and data integrity? How do users have confidence in this?

- Sustainability: How does the system stay relevant over time?

- Claim lifecycle: How are claims valued over time? Can they be revoked and under what conditions?

- Resilience: How does the system protect against attacks that reduce the integrity of the reputation value?

- Legal: What is the legal environment in which the system sits? Are there potential violations of ‘natural’ law?

The rest of this paper will further define these considerations and populate each with examples and considerations for their design. We will continue to develop and refine to establish language standards for discussing reputation systems.

We have not defined what is and isn’t required for each consideration, as particular implementations may have differing reasons for each. However, we anticipate that best practices for these considerations will be topics for future analysis.

Divisions: 20 Department of Computer Science
20 Department of Computer Science > Telecooperation
Date Deposited: 10 Aug 2018 08:47
Last Modified: 15 Aug 2023 11:08
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