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Liquido: Embedding Liquids into 3D Printed Objects to Sense Tilting and Motion

Schmitz, Martin and Leister, Andreas and Dezfuli, Niloofar and Riemann, Jan and Müller, Florian and Mühlhäuser, Max (2016):
Liquido: Embedding Liquids into 3D Printed Objects to Sense Tilting and Motion.
In: Proceedings of the 34rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, ACM, San Jose, CA, USA, In: CHI EA'16, ISBN 978-1-4503-4082-3,
DOI: 10.1145/2851581.2892275,
[Online-Edition: https://doi.org/10.1145/2851581.2892275],
[Conference or Workshop Item]

Abstract

Tilting and motion are widely used as interaction modalities in smart objects such as wearables and smart phones (e.g., to detect posture or shaking). They are often sensed with accelerometers. In this paper, we propose to embed liquids into 3D printed objects while printing to sense various tilting and motion interactions via capacitive sensing. This method reduces the assembly effort after printing and is a low-cost and easy-to-apply way of extending the input capabilities of 3D printed objects. We contribute two liquid sensing patterns and a practical printing process using a standard dual-extrusion 3D printer and commercially available materials. We validate the method by a series of evaluations and provide a set of interactive example applications.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Erschienen: 2016
Creators: Schmitz, Martin and Leister, Andreas and Dezfuli, Niloofar and Riemann, Jan and Müller, Florian and Mühlhäuser, Max
Title: Liquido: Embedding Liquids into 3D Printed Objects to Sense Tilting and Motion
Language: German
Abstract:

Tilting and motion are widely used as interaction modalities in smart objects such as wearables and smart phones (e.g., to detect posture or shaking). They are often sensed with accelerometers. In this paper, we propose to embed liquids into 3D printed objects while printing to sense various tilting and motion interactions via capacitive sensing. This method reduces the assembly effort after printing and is a low-cost and easy-to-apply way of extending the input capabilities of 3D printed objects. We contribute two liquid sensing patterns and a practical printing process using a standard dual-extrusion 3D printer and commercially available materials. We validate the method by a series of evaluations and provide a set of interactive example applications.

Title of Book: Proceedings of the 34rd Annual ACM Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Series Name: CHI EA'16
Publisher: ACM
ISBN: 978-1-4503-4082-3
Uncontrolled Keywords: - TI - Area Tangible Interaction;3D printing; digital fabrication; rapid prototyping; printed electronics; capacitive sensing; input sensing; tilting; mo- tion; interaction devices
Divisions: 20 Department of Computer Science
20 Department of Computer Science > Telecooperation
Profile Areas
Profile Areas > Cybersecurity (CYSEC)
Event Location: San Jose, CA, USA
Date Deposited: 31 Dec 2016 12:59
DOI: 10.1145/2851581.2892275
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1145/2851581.2892275
Identification Number: TUD-CS-2016-0039
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