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Computer-Integrated Engineering and Design

Weber, Martin and Abedini, Scholeh and Ahmels, Laura and Albrecht, Katharina and Anderl, Reiner and Bruder, Enrico and Groche, Peter and Kaufmann, Heinz and Mahajan, Pushkar and Melz, Tobias and Özel, Mahmut and Pouriayevali, Habib and Reising, Jakob and Schäfer, Stefan and Tijani, Yakub and Tomasella, Alessio and Xu, Bai-Xiang
Groche, Peter and Bruder, Enrico and Gramlich, Sebastian (eds.) (2017):
Computer-Integrated Engineering and Design.
In: Manufacturing Integrated Design, Springer International Publishing, pp. 201-243, DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-52377-4₆, [Online-Edition: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-52377-4_6],
[Book Section]

Abstract

Virtual product development aims at the use of information modeling techniques and computer-aided (CAx-) tools during the product development process, to represent the real product digitally as an integrated product model (Anderl and Trippner 2000). Thereby, data related to the product as well as product properties are generated and stored as result of the product development process (e.g., product planning, conceptual design) (Pahl et al. 2007; VDI 2221 1993). Within virtual product development CAx process chains have been established. They comprise the concatenating of the applied tools and technologies within the steps of the virtual product development process enabling the consistent use of product data (Anderl and Trippner 2000). The computer-aided design (CAD) technology aims at the integration of computer systems to support engineers during the design process such as design conceptualization, design, and documentation. It provides the geometry of the design and its properties (e.g., mass properties, tolerances) which is abstracted to be used in computer-aided engineering (CAE) systems (e.g., finite element method (FEM)) for design analysis, evaluation, and optimization. The computer-aided process planning (CAPP) technology provides tools to support process planning, Numerical Control (NC) programming, and quality control (Hehenberger 2011; Lee 1998; Vajna 2009). The advantages are continuous processing and refinement of the product model, minimizing the modeling efforts regarding time as well as costs and avoiding error sources. In addition, all relevant data and information related to the product can be provided for subsequent processing (Anderl and Trippner 2000). CAx technologies have been widely established within the product development processes in industry. They have been further developed in the last years; however efforts to integrate and to automate them are still a topic of research. Especially, with the introduction of innovative manufacturing technologies such as linear flow and bend splitting require new methods and tools for the virtual product development process. These technologies enable the production of a new range of sheet metal products with characteristic properties (e.g., Y-profile geometry, material properties) that are not addressed in state-of-the-art methods and tools.

Item Type: Book Section
Erschienen: 2017
Editors: Groche, Peter and Bruder, Enrico and Gramlich, Sebastian
Creators: Weber, Martin and Abedini, Scholeh and Ahmels, Laura and Albrecht, Katharina and Anderl, Reiner and Bruder, Enrico and Groche, Peter and Kaufmann, Heinz and Mahajan, Pushkar and Melz, Tobias and Özel, Mahmut and Pouriayevali, Habib and Reising, Jakob and Schäfer, Stefan and Tijani, Yakub and Tomasella, Alessio and Xu, Bai-Xiang
Title: Computer-Integrated Engineering and Design
Language: English
Abstract:

Virtual product development aims at the use of information modeling techniques and computer-aided (CAx-) tools during the product development process, to represent the real product digitally as an integrated product model (Anderl and Trippner 2000). Thereby, data related to the product as well as product properties are generated and stored as result of the product development process (e.g., product planning, conceptual design) (Pahl et al. 2007; VDI 2221 1993). Within virtual product development CAx process chains have been established. They comprise the concatenating of the applied tools and technologies within the steps of the virtual product development process enabling the consistent use of product data (Anderl and Trippner 2000). The computer-aided design (CAD) technology aims at the integration of computer systems to support engineers during the design process such as design conceptualization, design, and documentation. It provides the geometry of the design and its properties (e.g., mass properties, tolerances) which is abstracted to be used in computer-aided engineering (CAE) systems (e.g., finite element method (FEM)) for design analysis, evaluation, and optimization. The computer-aided process planning (CAPP) technology provides tools to support process planning, Numerical Control (NC) programming, and quality control (Hehenberger 2011; Lee 1998; Vajna 2009). The advantages are continuous processing and refinement of the product model, minimizing the modeling efforts regarding time as well as costs and avoiding error sources. In addition, all relevant data and information related to the product can be provided for subsequent processing (Anderl and Trippner 2000). CAx technologies have been widely established within the product development processes in industry. They have been further developed in the last years; however efforts to integrate and to automate them are still a topic of research. Especially, with the introduction of innovative manufacturing technologies such as linear flow and bend splitting require new methods and tools for the virtual product development process. These technologies enable the production of a new range of sheet metal products with characteristic properties (e.g., Y-profile geometry, material properties) that are not addressed in state-of-the-art methods and tools.

Title of Book: Manufacturing Integrated Design
Publisher: Springer International Publishing
ISBN: 978-3-319-52377-4
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Physical Metallurgy
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Department of Computer Integrated Design (DiK)
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Institut für Produktionstechnik und Umformmaschinen (PtU)
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio)
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio) > Collaborative Research Centres
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio) > Collaborative Research Centres > CRC 666: Integral Sheet Metal Design with Higher Order Bifurcations
Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2017 08:17
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-52377-4₆
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-52377-4_6
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