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Free-Standing Networks of Core–Shell Metal and Metal Oxide Nanotubes for Glucose Sensing

Muench, Falk and Sun, Luwan and Kottakkat, Tintula and Antoni, Markus and Schaefer, Sandra and Kunz, Ulrike and Molina-Luna, Leopoldo and Duerrschnabel, Michael and Kleebe, Hans-Joachim and Ayata, Sevda and Roth, Christina and Ensinger, Wolfgang :
Free-Standing Networks of Core–Shell Metal and Metal Oxide Nanotubes for Glucose Sensing.
[Online-Edition: https://doi.org/10.1021/acsami.6b13979]
In: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, 9 (1) pp. 771-781. ISSN 1944-8244
[Article] , (2017)

Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1021/acsami.6b13979

Abstract

Nanotube assemblies represent an emerging class of advanced functional materials, whose utility is however hampered by intricate production processes. In this work, three classes of nanotube networks (monometallic, bimetallic, and metal oxide) are synthesized solely using facile redox reactions and commercially available ion track membranes. First, the disordered pores of an ion track membrane are widened by chemical etching, resulting in the formation of a strongly interconnected pore network. Replicating this template structure with electroless copper plating yields a monolithic film composed of crossing metal nanotubes. We show that the parent material can be easily transformed into bimetallic or oxidic derivatives by applying a second electroless plating or thermal oxidation step. These treatments retain the monolithic network structure but result in the formation of core–shell nanotubes of altered composition (thermal oxidation: Cu2O-CuO; electroless nickel coating: Cu–Ni). The obtained nanomaterials are applied in the enzyme-free electrochemical detection of glucose, showing very high sensitivities between 2.27 and 2.83 A M–1 cm–2. Depending on the material composition, varying reactivities were observed: While copper oxidation reduces the response to glucose, it is increased in the case of nickel modification, albeit at the cost of decreased selectivity. The performance of the materials is explained by the network architecture, which combines the advantages of one-dimensional nano-objects (continuous conduction pathways, high surface area) with those of a self-supporting, open-porous superstructure (binder-free catalyst layer, efficient diffusion). In summary, this novel synthetic approach provides a fast, scalable, and flexible route toward free-standing nanotube arrays of high compositional complexity.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2017
Creators: Muench, Falk and Sun, Luwan and Kottakkat, Tintula and Antoni, Markus and Schaefer, Sandra and Kunz, Ulrike and Molina-Luna, Leopoldo and Duerrschnabel, Michael and Kleebe, Hans-Joachim and Ayata, Sevda and Roth, Christina and Ensinger, Wolfgang
Title: Free-Standing Networks of Core–Shell Metal and Metal Oxide Nanotubes for Glucose Sensing
Language: English
Abstract:

Nanotube assemblies represent an emerging class of advanced functional materials, whose utility is however hampered by intricate production processes. In this work, three classes of nanotube networks (monometallic, bimetallic, and metal oxide) are synthesized solely using facile redox reactions and commercially available ion track membranes. First, the disordered pores of an ion track membrane are widened by chemical etching, resulting in the formation of a strongly interconnected pore network. Replicating this template structure with electroless copper plating yields a monolithic film composed of crossing metal nanotubes. We show that the parent material can be easily transformed into bimetallic or oxidic derivatives by applying a second electroless plating or thermal oxidation step. These treatments retain the monolithic network structure but result in the formation of core–shell nanotubes of altered composition (thermal oxidation: Cu2O-CuO; electroless nickel coating: Cu–Ni). The obtained nanomaterials are applied in the enzyme-free electrochemical detection of glucose, showing very high sensitivities between 2.27 and 2.83 A M–1 cm–2. Depending on the material composition, varying reactivities were observed: While copper oxidation reduces the response to glucose, it is increased in the case of nickel modification, albeit at the cost of decreased selectivity. The performance of the materials is explained by the network architecture, which combines the advantages of one-dimensional nano-objects (continuous conduction pathways, high surface area) with those of a self-supporting, open-porous superstructure (binder-free catalyst layer, efficient diffusion). In summary, this novel synthetic approach provides a fast, scalable, and flexible route toward free-standing nanotube arrays of high compositional complexity.

Journal or Publication Title: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
Volume: 9
Number: 1
Publisher: American Chemical Society
Uncontrolled Keywords: core−shell nanostructures, electroless plating, enzyme-free glucose sensing, ion-track Technology, Kirkendall effect, metal nanotubes
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Earth Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Earth Science > Geo-Material-Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Material Analytics
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Physical Metallurgy
Date Deposited: 11 Jul 2017 12:12
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1021/acsami.6b13979
Identification Number: doi:10.1021/acsami.6b13979
Funders: We sincerely thank it4ip (Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium) for suppling us with the track etched polycarbonate membranes employed in this study., M.D. and L.M. acknowledge financial support from the Hessen State Ministry of Higher Education, Research and the Arts via LOEWE RESPONSE., The transmission electron microscope used in this work was partially funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG/ INST163/2951).
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