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Towards a complete recycling of phosphorus in wastewater treatment – options in Germany

Petzet, Sebastian and Cornel, Peter (2010):
Towards a complete recycling of phosphorus in wastewater treatment – options in Germany.
In: Water Science & Technology, IWA Publishing, pp. 25-39, 64, (2), ISSN 0273-1223,
[Article]

Abstract

Global reserves of mineral phosphorus are finite and the recycling of phosphorus from wastewater, a significant sink for phosphorus, can contribute to a more sustainable use. In Germany, Switzerland, and the Netherlands, an increasing percentage of municipal sewage sludge is incinerated and the contained phosphorus is lost. This paper reviews current technologies and shows that a complete phosphorus recovery from wastewater is technically feasible. Depending on the composition of the sewage sludge ash (SSA), there are various options for phosphorus recovery that are presented. Iron-poor SSAs can be used directly as substitute for phosphate rock in the electrothermal phosphorus process. SSAs with low heavy metal contents can be used as fertilizer without prior metal elimination. Ashes not suitable for direct recycling can be processed by thermal processes. Operators of wastewater treatment plants can additionally influence the ash composition via the selection of precipitants and the control of (indirect) dischargers. This way, they can choose the most suitable phosphorus recovery option. For sewage sludge that is co-incinerated in power plants, municipal waste incinerators or cement kilns phosphorus recovery is not possible. The phosphorus is lost forever.

Towards a complete recycling of phosphorus in wastewater treatment - options in Germany. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/51770123_Towards_a_complete_recycling_of_phosphorus_in_wastewater_treatment_-_options_in_Germany [accessed Jun 1, 2017].

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2010
Creators: Petzet, Sebastian and Cornel, Peter
Title: Towards a complete recycling of phosphorus in wastewater treatment – options in Germany
Language: English
Abstract:

Global reserves of mineral phosphorus are finite and the recycling of phosphorus from wastewater, a significant sink for phosphorus, can contribute to a more sustainable use. In Germany, Switzerland, and the Netherlands, an increasing percentage of municipal sewage sludge is incinerated and the contained phosphorus is lost. This paper reviews current technologies and shows that a complete phosphorus recovery from wastewater is technically feasible. Depending on the composition of the sewage sludge ash (SSA), there are various options for phosphorus recovery that are presented. Iron-poor SSAs can be used directly as substitute for phosphate rock in the electrothermal phosphorus process. SSAs with low heavy metal contents can be used as fertilizer without prior metal elimination. Ashes not suitable for direct recycling can be processed by thermal processes. Operators of wastewater treatment plants can additionally influence the ash composition via the selection of precipitants and the control of (indirect) dischargers. This way, they can choose the most suitable phosphorus recovery option. For sewage sludge that is co-incinerated in power plants, municipal waste incinerators or cement kilns phosphorus recovery is not possible. The phosphorus is lost forever.

Towards a complete recycling of phosphorus in wastewater treatment - options in Germany. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/51770123_Towards_a_complete_recycling_of_phosphorus_in_wastewater_treatment_-_options_in_Germany [accessed Jun 1, 2017].

Journal or Publication Title: Water Science & Technology
Volume: 64
Number: 2
Publisher: IWA Publishing
Divisions: 13 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Sciences > Institute IWAR
13 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Sciences > Institute IWAR > Wastewater Technology
13 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Sciences
Date Deposited: 27 Jun 2017 10:03
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