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Improved cell adhesion under shear stress in PDMS microfluidic devices

Siddique, Asma and Meckel, Tobias and Stark, Robert W. and Narayan, Suman (2017):
Improved cell adhesion under shear stress in PDMS microfluidic devices.
In: Colloids and Surfaces B-Biointerfaces, Elsevier Science Publishing, pp. 456-464, 150, ISSN 0927-7765, [Online-Edition: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2016.11.011],
[Article]

Abstract

Microfluidic systems based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) provide a versatile platform to study the mechanoresponse of cells in vitro. Under a shear flow, however, the stability of cells that were grown on physically adsorbed proteins is short lived, which limits long-term cell studies. To address this issue, we used (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) as a linker between PDMS and collagen. In micro-channels that were modified with APTES-anchored collagen, fibroblast cells demonstrated higher stability and better proliferation as compared to collagen that was physically adsorbed onto PDMS after oxygen plasma treatment. To assess the stability of the cellular adhesion, cells were forced in a shear flow until detachment. In devices with APTES-anchored collagen, cells showed better adhesion and proliferation at shear stresses between 11.6 and 93 dyn/cm2 as compared to devices with the adsorbed collagen coating where the first cellular detachment occurred already at a shear stress of 23 dyn/cm2. The APTES-attached collagen coating also contributed to an improved long-term cellular growth (observed for 48 h) at different shear stress levels (10–300 dyn/cm2). Attachment of collagen with the help of APTES thus is a very promising technique not only to modify the glass but also to modify the PDMS surfaces of microfluidic devices for mechanotransduction experiments.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2017
Creators: Siddique, Asma and Meckel, Tobias and Stark, Robert W. and Narayan, Suman
Title: Improved cell adhesion under shear stress in PDMS microfluidic devices
Language: English
Abstract:

Microfluidic systems based on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) provide a versatile platform to study the mechanoresponse of cells in vitro. Under a shear flow, however, the stability of cells that were grown on physically adsorbed proteins is short lived, which limits long-term cell studies. To address this issue, we used (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) as a linker between PDMS and collagen. In micro-channels that were modified with APTES-anchored collagen, fibroblast cells demonstrated higher stability and better proliferation as compared to collagen that was physically adsorbed onto PDMS after oxygen plasma treatment. To assess the stability of the cellular adhesion, cells were forced in a shear flow until detachment. In devices with APTES-anchored collagen, cells showed better adhesion and proliferation at shear stresses between 11.6 and 93 dyn/cm2 as compared to devices with the adsorbed collagen coating where the first cellular detachment occurred already at a shear stress of 23 dyn/cm2. The APTES-attached collagen coating also contributed to an improved long-term cellular growth (observed for 48 h) at different shear stress levels (10–300 dyn/cm2). Attachment of collagen with the help of APTES thus is a very promising technique not only to modify the glass but also to modify the PDMS surfaces of microfluidic devices for mechanotransduction experiments.

Journal or Publication Title: Colloids and Surfaces B-Biointerfaces
Volume: 150
Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishing
Uncontrolled Keywords: Microfluidics, Cell adhesion, Shear stress, APTES, PDMS, Surface modification
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology
10 Department of Biology > Membrane Dynamics
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Physics of Surfaces
Profile Areas
Profile Areas > Thermo-Fluids & Interfaces
Date Deposited: 03 Apr 2017 10:12
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.colsurfb.2016.11.011
Funders: A. S. acknowledges Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD) and Higher Education Commission (HEC) Pakistan for the doctoral scholarship in Germany.
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