TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Dynamics of high-speed-resolved wing and body kinematics of freely flying houseflies responding to directed and undirected air turbulence

Mohd Nasir, Mohd Nazri :
Dynamics of high-speed-resolved wing and body kinematics of freely flying houseflies responding to directed and undirected air turbulence.
[Online-Edition: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/5919]
Technische Universität , Darmstadt
[Dissertation], (2017)

Offizielle URL: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/5919

Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract)

From tiny flies to huge dragonflies, aerial locomotion of insects requires sophisticated biological control strategies and unusual aerodynamic mechanisms. During flight, unpredictable changes of ambient air flow may destabilize body posture and control owing to changes in aerodynamic force production. Pioneering discoveries demonstrated that insects such as flies actively regulate body appendages such as wings, legs and the abdomen to encounter aerial perturbations. To quantify this behaviour, I thus investigated how housefly Musca domestica behaved in response to undirected, turbulent air flows and directed impulsive wind gusts. To evaluate theoretical predictions, I three-dimensionally reconstructed body and wing motion using time-resolved high-speed videography and stimulated the freely flying animals under laboratory conditions. Impairments of mechanosensory receptors functionality allowed me to distinguish between active and passive behavioural responses and to investigate the role of sensory feedback for flight control during perturbations.

The results show that houseflies typically do not take-off when mean air velocity exceed ~0.63ms-1, which compares to ~2% relative turbulence intensity. In still air, flies take-off immediately after releasing them and respond to impulsive wind gusts by uniform changes in body posture. The directional dependency of these changes is explained by a numerical aerodynamic based on quasi-steady considerations of interaction between wind gust, body and wing velocities. Shortest behavioural response delays were measured during anterior perturbation, amounting to 2.4ms (yaw axis), 5ms (roll axis) and 7.3ms (pitch axis). Under this condition, flies showed the shortest alteration period of 8ms (pitch), 13ms (roll) and 17.5ms (yaw) compared to other direction of perturbations. Body roll angle changes more strongly (18.5 fold increase) than yaw (7-fold increase) and pitch (6.4-fold increase) in response to gusts, suggesting that roll stability is most sensitive. Houseflies also actively modulate the wing kinematics to recover from aerial perturbations. In response to anterior perturbation, flies reduce mean wingbeat amplitude by ~25%, mean wing elevation angle by ~29% compared to non-perturbated controls. Approximately ~2.5 stroke cycles (~15ms) after perturbation onset, mean wingtip velocity hit the minimum of 3ms-1 and flies dynamically soars with little wing movement for 1 stroke cycles within the air stream. While responding to the gust, wing angle of attacks decreases during downstroke by ~45.5% (~60.5° at t=13.5ms) that leads to a decrease in the lift coefficient. This stabilizes lift and body position in vertical axis. During upstroke, by contrast, wing angle of attacks increases 1 fold (~-0.5° at t=12ms) compared to non perturbated controls (63±5.4°), which elevates aerodynamic drag on the flapping wings. Owing to the horizontal stroke plane, the latter change augments thrust, propelling forward and compensating for gust-induced forces. The measured response times suggest that the changes in wing kinematics cannot be explained by sensory feedback from the antennae because delays of antennae and vision mediated feedback are higher than the measured ones. This suggests that posture stabilization reflexes in flies likely results from feedback mediated by the fly’s gyroscopic halteres, signalling postural changes within ~6.7ms (a single wing stroke cycle). This thesis extends our current knowledge on insect free flight control during aerial perturbations by quantifying kinematics and behavioural response delays in houseflies.

Collectively, the study provides time-resolved kinematic data on how flies cope with turbulent and wind gust. Our research delivers a contribution to the answer of the question on how insects achieve their superior flight performance. The presented data on the housefly complement recent studies in other species of flying insects and the findings are also useful in a wide scientific context. The biological flight control strategies may be transferred to the biomimetic, miniaturized micro aerial vehicles propelled by flapping wing motion.

Typ des Eintrags: Dissertation
Erschienen: 2017
Autor(en): Mohd Nasir, Mohd Nazri
Titel: Dynamics of high-speed-resolved wing and body kinematics of freely flying houseflies responding to directed and undirected air turbulence
Sprache: Englisch
Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract):

From tiny flies to huge dragonflies, aerial locomotion of insects requires sophisticated biological control strategies and unusual aerodynamic mechanisms. During flight, unpredictable changes of ambient air flow may destabilize body posture and control owing to changes in aerodynamic force production. Pioneering discoveries demonstrated that insects such as flies actively regulate body appendages such as wings, legs and the abdomen to encounter aerial perturbations. To quantify this behaviour, I thus investigated how housefly Musca domestica behaved in response to undirected, turbulent air flows and directed impulsive wind gusts. To evaluate theoretical predictions, I three-dimensionally reconstructed body and wing motion using time-resolved high-speed videography and stimulated the freely flying animals under laboratory conditions. Impairments of mechanosensory receptors functionality allowed me to distinguish between active and passive behavioural responses and to investigate the role of sensory feedback for flight control during perturbations.

The results show that houseflies typically do not take-off when mean air velocity exceed ~0.63ms-1, which compares to ~2% relative turbulence intensity. In still air, flies take-off immediately after releasing them and respond to impulsive wind gusts by uniform changes in body posture. The directional dependency of these changes is explained by a numerical aerodynamic based on quasi-steady considerations of interaction between wind gust, body and wing velocities. Shortest behavioural response delays were measured during anterior perturbation, amounting to 2.4ms (yaw axis), 5ms (roll axis) and 7.3ms (pitch axis). Under this condition, flies showed the shortest alteration period of 8ms (pitch), 13ms (roll) and 17.5ms (yaw) compared to other direction of perturbations. Body roll angle changes more strongly (18.5 fold increase) than yaw (7-fold increase) and pitch (6.4-fold increase) in response to gusts, suggesting that roll stability is most sensitive. Houseflies also actively modulate the wing kinematics to recover from aerial perturbations. In response to anterior perturbation, flies reduce mean wingbeat amplitude by ~25%, mean wing elevation angle by ~29% compared to non-perturbated controls. Approximately ~2.5 stroke cycles (~15ms) after perturbation onset, mean wingtip velocity hit the minimum of 3ms-1 and flies dynamically soars with little wing movement for 1 stroke cycles within the air stream. While responding to the gust, wing angle of attacks decreases during downstroke by ~45.5% (~60.5° at t=13.5ms) that leads to a decrease in the lift coefficient. This stabilizes lift and body position in vertical axis. During upstroke, by contrast, wing angle of attacks increases 1 fold (~-0.5° at t=12ms) compared to non perturbated controls (63±5.4°), which elevates aerodynamic drag on the flapping wings. Owing to the horizontal stroke plane, the latter change augments thrust, propelling forward and compensating for gust-induced forces. The measured response times suggest that the changes in wing kinematics cannot be explained by sensory feedback from the antennae because delays of antennae and vision mediated feedback are higher than the measured ones. This suggests that posture stabilization reflexes in flies likely results from feedback mediated by the fly’s gyroscopic halteres, signalling postural changes within ~6.7ms (a single wing stroke cycle). This thesis extends our current knowledge on insect free flight control during aerial perturbations by quantifying kinematics and behavioural response delays in houseflies.

Collectively, the study provides time-resolved kinematic data on how flies cope with turbulent and wind gust. Our research delivers a contribution to the answer of the question on how insects achieve their superior flight performance. The presented data on the housefly complement recent studies in other species of flying insects and the findings are also useful in a wide scientific context. The biological flight control strategies may be transferred to the biomimetic, miniaturized micro aerial vehicles propelled by flapping wing motion.

Ort: Darmstadt
Fachbereich(e)/-gebiet(e): 16 Fachbereich Maschinenbau
16 Fachbereich Maschinenbau > Fachgebiet für Strömungsdynamik (fdy)
16 Fachbereich Maschinenbau > Fachgebiet für Strömungsdynamik (fdy) > Strömungsmechanische Modellentwicklung
Hinterlegungsdatum: 15 Jan 2017 20:55
Offizielle URL: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/5919
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-59190
Gutachter / Prüfer: Cameron, Prof. Dr. Tropea ; Fritz-Olaf, Prof. Dr. Lehmann
Datum der Begutachtung bzw. der mündlichen Prüfung / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 10 Januar 2017
Alternatives oder übersetztes Abstract:
AbstractSprache
Von winzigen Fliegen zu riesigen Libellen, erfordert die Luftzirkulation von Insekten ausgeklügelte biologische Kontrollstrategien und ungewöhnliche aerodynamische Mechanismen. Während des Fluges können unvorhersehbare Änderungen des Umgebungsluftstroms die Körperhaltung und die Kontrolle aufgrund von Änderungen der aerodynamischen Kraftproduktion zerstören. Pionier-Entdeckungen gezeigt, dass Insekten wie Fliegen aktiv regulieren Körper Anhängsel wie Flügel, Beine und Bauch, um Luftstörungen zu begegnen. Um dieses Verhalten zu quantifizieren, untersuchte ich damit, wie sich Hausfliege Musca domestica als Reaktion auf ungerichtete, turbulente Luftströmungen und gezielte impulsive Windböen verhielt. Um theoretische Vorhersagen zu bewerten, habe ich dreidimensional rekonstruierte Körper- und Flügelbewegung mit zeitaufgelöster Hochgeschwindigkeits-Videografie und stimulierte die frei fliegenden Tiere unter Laborbedingungen. Beeinträchtigungen der Funktion der mechanosensorischen Rezeptoren erlaubten mir, zwischen aktiven und passiven Verhaltensreaktionen zu unterscheiden und die Rolle des sensorischen Feedbacks für die Flugsteuerung während Störungen zu untersuchen. Die Ergebnisse zeigen, dass Stubenfliegen typischerweise nicht starten, wenn die mittlere Luftgeschwindigkeit ~0.63ms-1, übersteigt, was einer relativen Turbulenzintensität von 2% entspricht. In der Luft fliegen die Fliegen sofort nach der Freisetzung und reagieren auf impulsive Windböen durch gleichmäßige Körperhaltung. Die Richtungsabhängigkeit dieser Änderungen wird durch eine numerische Aerodynamik erklärt, die auf quasi-stationären Betrachtungen der Wechselwirkung zwischen Windbögen, Körper- und Flügelgeschwindigkeiten basiert. Kürzeste Verhaltensverzögerungen wurden während einer anterioren Störung gemessen, was 2,4 ms (Gierachse), 5 ms (Rollachse) und 7,3 ms (Nickachse) betrug. Unter dieser Bedingung zeigten Fliegen die kürzeste Änderungsperiode von 8 ms (pitch), 13 ms (roll) und 17,5 ms (Gier) im Vergleich zu anderen Richtungen von Störungen. Der Körperrollwinkel ändert sich stärker (18,5-facher Anstieg) als Gier (7-fache Zunahme) und Pitch (6,4-facher Anstieg) als Reaktion auf Böen, was nahelegt, dass die Rollstabilität am empfindlichsten ist. Stubenfliegen auch aktiv modulieren die Flügel Kinematik von Luftstörungen zu erholen. Als Reaktion auf eine anteriore Störung verringern Fliegen die durchschnittliche Flügelschlagamplitude um ~ 25%, den mittleren Flügelhöhenwinkel um ~ 29% im Vergleich zu nicht störenden Kontrollen. Etwa ~ 2,5-Takt-Zyklen (~ 15ms) nach Störungsbeginn, mittlere Wingtip-Geschwindigkeit traf das Minimum von 3ms-1 und fliegt dynamisch mit geringer Flügelbewegung für 1 Hubzyklen innerhalb des Luftstroms. Während des Ansprechens auf den Böen nimmt der Flügelwinkel der Angriffe während des Abschlags um ~ 45,5% ab (~ 60,5 ° bei t = 13,5 ms), was zu einer Verringerung des Auftriebskoeffizienten führt. Dadurch wird die Hub- und Körperposition in der vertikalen Achse stabilisiert. Während des Aufstiegs erhöht sich der Flügelwinkel der Angriffe im Vergleich zu nicht störenden Kontrollen (63 ± 5,4 °) um das 1fache (~ -0,5 ° bei t = 12ms), was den aerodynamischen Widerstand der Schlagflügel erhöht. Durch die horizontale Hubebene ändert sich die Änderung der Schubkraft, die nach vorne treibt und die gietsbedingten Kräfte kompensiert. Die gemessenen Reaktionszeiten deuten darauf hin, dass die Veränderungen der Flügelkinematik nicht durch eine sensorische Rückkopplung der Antennen erklärt werden können, da Verzögerungen von Antennen und visionsvermittelter Rückkopplung höher sind als die gemessenen. Dies deutet darauf hin, dass Haltungsstabilisierungsreflexe in Fliegen wahrscheinlich aus einer Rückkopplung resultieren, die durch die gyroskopischen Halfter der Fliege vermittelt wird, wodurch posturale Veränderungen innerhalb von ~ 6,7 ms (ein einzelner Flügelschlagzyklus) signalisiert werden. Diese Arbeit erweitert unser derzeitiges Wissen über die Insektenflugsteuerung bei Luftstörungen durch Quantifizierung von Kinematik und Verhaltensverzögerungen bei Stubenfliegen. Zusammengefasst bietet die Studie zeitaufgelöste kinematische Daten, wie Fliegen mit Turbulenz und Windböen fertig werden. Unsere Forschung liefert einen Beitrag zur Beantwortung der Frage, wie Insekten ihre überlegene Flugleistung erreichen. Die präsentierten Daten über die Stubenfliege ergänzen kürzlich Studien in anderen Arten von fliegenden Insekten und die Ergebnisse sind auch nützlich in einem weiten wissenschaftlichen Kontext. Die biologischen Flugsteuerungsstrategien können auf die biomimetischen, miniaturisierten Mikroantennenfahrzeuge übertragen werden, die durch eine Schlagflügelbewegung angetrieben werden.Deutsch
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

Eintrag anzeigen Eintrag anzeigen