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Magnetic anisotropy ofSm2Fe17single crystals

Diop, L. V. B. and Kuz'min, M. D. and Skokov, K. P. and Karpenkov, D. Yu. and Gutfleisch, O. (2016):
Magnetic anisotropy ofSm2Fe17single crystals.
In: Physical Review B, American Physical Society, p. 144413, 94, (14), ISSN 2469-9950,
[Online-Edition: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.94.144413],
[Article]

Abstract

The previously accepted notion that the spontaneous magnetization of Sm2Fe17 lies in the basal plane of the crystal is true only approximately, and then only around room temperature. At low temperatures the magnetization, whose orientation is not fixed by the symmetry, is found to deviate from the basal plane by as much as 10 degrees. The threefold symmetry axis is a hard direction; to magnetize the crystal in this direction, a magnetic field of about 9 T is required. The hard-axis magnetization arrives at saturation discontinuously, by way of a first-order phase transition. The behavior is a general one for trigonal ferromagnets where K-1 < 0 and the leading trigonal anisotropy constant is nonzero, K-2' not equal 0. Although of universal occurrence, the first-order transition is only visible at low temperatures, where it is accompanied by a magnetization anomaly of sufficient size.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2016
Creators: Diop, L. V. B. and Kuz'min, M. D. and Skokov, K. P. and Karpenkov, D. Yu. and Gutfleisch, O.
Title: Magnetic anisotropy ofSm2Fe17single crystals
Language: English
Abstract:

The previously accepted notion that the spontaneous magnetization of Sm2Fe17 lies in the basal plane of the crystal is true only approximately, and then only around room temperature. At low temperatures the magnetization, whose orientation is not fixed by the symmetry, is found to deviate from the basal plane by as much as 10 degrees. The threefold symmetry axis is a hard direction; to magnetize the crystal in this direction, a magnetic field of about 9 T is required. The hard-axis magnetization arrives at saturation discontinuously, by way of a first-order phase transition. The behavior is a general one for trigonal ferromagnets where K-1 < 0 and the leading trigonal anisotropy constant is nonzero, K-2' not equal 0. Although of universal occurrence, the first-order transition is only visible at low temperatures, where it is accompanied by a magnetization anomaly of sufficient size.

Journal or Publication Title: Physical Review B
Volume: 94
Number: 14
Publisher: American Physical Society
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Functional Materials
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
Date Deposited: 18 Nov 2016 10:07
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.94.144413
Identification Number: doi:10.1103/PhysRevB.94.144413
Funders: The financial support by the German federal state of Hessen through its excellence programme LOEWE "RESPONSE" is acknowledged.
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