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Spatial compatibility effects in human-machine interaction

Sutter, Christine and Jonen, Sabrina :
Spatial compatibility effects in human-machine interaction.
In: Conference of Experimental Psychologists, 21.-23.03.2016, Heidelberg.
[Conference or Workshop Item] , (2016)

Abstract

Spatial separation and distortions between perception and action often specifies tool use in modern human-machine interaction. Theories of common coding propose that sensory and motor information is represented within the same cognitive domain. Consequently, they are likely to interact with each other and interfere action control if spatial relations between perceived and to-be-produced events do not correspond. In the experiment we systematically varied the spatial correspondence between user, input and output device. In the control condition (spatial alignment), the user was positioned centrally to the input and output device. In three experimental conditions (partial spatial alignment), the user’s sitting posture (trunk not aligned), the input device (hands not aligned) or the output device (head not aligned) was 90°-rotated to the left, and the other components remained in their original position and were spatially aligned. Participants performed ipsi- or contralateral hand movements in response to colored stimuli, while the spatial stimulus location had to be ignored (Simon task). They did not see the stimuli and hands directly, but received visual feedback on a projection screen. Results showed a significant Simon effect for reaction times: Compatible responses were faster than incompatible responses. The Simon effect increased in conditions with only partial spatial alignment, and was most pronounced for the 90°-rotated output device. Error analysis ruled out the speed-accuracy trade-off as an explanation for effects in reaction time. The findings show that user orientation and spatial correspondence between user, input and output device interferes cognitive processes. In conclusion, spatial alignment in human-machine interaction is of particular importance in time-sensitive and hazardous work places where responses have to be very fast and very accurate at the same time, for instance in air traffic control or in remote maintenance and control.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Erschienen: 2016
Creators: Sutter, Christine and Jonen, Sabrina
Title: Spatial compatibility effects in human-machine interaction
Language: English
Abstract:

Spatial separation and distortions between perception and action often specifies tool use in modern human-machine interaction. Theories of common coding propose that sensory and motor information is represented within the same cognitive domain. Consequently, they are likely to interact with each other and interfere action control if spatial relations between perceived and to-be-produced events do not correspond. In the experiment we systematically varied the spatial correspondence between user, input and output device. In the control condition (spatial alignment), the user was positioned centrally to the input and output device. In three experimental conditions (partial spatial alignment), the user’s sitting posture (trunk not aligned), the input device (hands not aligned) or the output device (head not aligned) was 90°-rotated to the left, and the other components remained in their original position and were spatially aligned. Participants performed ipsi- or contralateral hand movements in response to colored stimuli, while the spatial stimulus location had to be ignored (Simon task). They did not see the stimuli and hands directly, but received visual feedback on a projection screen. Results showed a significant Simon effect for reaction times: Compatible responses were faster than incompatible responses. The Simon effect increased in conditions with only partial spatial alignment, and was most pronounced for the 90°-rotated output device. Error analysis ruled out the speed-accuracy trade-off as an explanation for effects in reaction time. The findings show that user orientation and spatial correspondence between user, input and output device interferes cognitive processes. In conclusion, spatial alignment in human-machine interaction is of particular importance in time-sensitive and hazardous work places where responses have to be very fast and very accurate at the same time, for instance in air traffic control or in remote maintenance and control.

Divisions: 16 Department of Mechanical Engineering
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Ergonomics (IAD)
Event Title: Conference of Experimental Psychologists
Event Location: Heidelberg
Event Dates: 21.-23.03.2016
Date Deposited: 18 Jul 2016 08:08
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