TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Mechanism Transitions: A New Paradigm for a Highly Adaptive Internet

Frömmgen, Alexander and Hassan, Mohamed and Kluge, Roland and Mousavi, Mahdi and Mühlhäuser, Max and Müller, Sabrina and Schnee, Mathias and Stein, Michael and Weckesser, Markus
Mühlhäuser, Max (ed.) (2016):
Mechanism Transitions: A New Paradigm for a Highly Adaptive Internet.
Darmstadt, In: Technical report, ISSN 1864-0516,
[Online-Edition: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/5370],
[Report]

Abstract

The Internet faces ever faster and stronger dynamics in the behavior patterns of its users and hence, in the imposed load and traffic. However, the various ‘mechanisms’ used within the Internet—communication protocols and their functional components, overlays, middleware, etc.—cannot be sufficiently adapted at runtime: parameter adaptation is common practice, but the replacement of a mechanism by one that is functionally similar yet more appropriate—for the benefit of performance and quality—is rare. Those rare cases are tediously engineered case by case since on-the-fly transitions between similar mechanisms are not promoted by today’s Internet construction principles. In light of the considerations above, the present whitepaper advocates mechanism transitions as a fundamental new principle for the Internet and makes inroads into its modeling and specification. The quest for a fundamentally more flexible Internet is not only fueled by trends regarding users and applications ‘above’, but also by innovations in the network technology ‘below’: Software-defined systems and networks emerge as an enabling technology for more flexibility, but cannot be sufficiently leveraged for more flexibility in the Internet as a whole. The German Collaborative Research Center MAKI investigates appropriate models, concepts and methods as well as prerequisites and benefits in regard to mechanism transitions in the Future Internet. The present whitepaper comprises approaches to the modeling and specification of such mechanism transitions, both from a structural and a behavioral perspective, as developed over the last three years. The various other aspects of MAKI, such as investigations of particular sets of mechanism or monitoring and control aspects, are not covered here. The whitepaper starts by providing a more detailed discussion of the quest for Internet mechanism transitions and of related issues. It continues by introducing the basic MAKI architecture and terminology in comparison to those of the OSI standard and the Internet. In the sequel, different approaches to the general structural and behavioral modeling and specification of mechanism transitions are presented, as developed and used in MAKI. The presented research contributions were created with different purposes and focuses in mind; they represent important steps forward on our path towards a consolidated framework for mechanism transitions. In other words, they make inroads into a highly dynamic Future Internet that can cope with ever increasing dynamics. We will use terminology from the ISO OSI standard as a starting point for introducing our terms and concepts. For readers with limited knowledge in this underlying standard, we provide a short OSI terminology primer in the appendix.

Item Type: Report
Erschienen: 2016
Editors: Mühlhäuser, Max
Creators: Frömmgen, Alexander and Hassan, Mohamed and Kluge, Roland and Mousavi, Mahdi and Mühlhäuser, Max and Müller, Sabrina and Schnee, Mathias and Stein, Michael and Weckesser, Markus
Title: Mechanism Transitions: A New Paradigm for a Highly Adaptive Internet
Language: English
Abstract:

The Internet faces ever faster and stronger dynamics in the behavior patterns of its users and hence, in the imposed load and traffic. However, the various ‘mechanisms’ used within the Internet—communication protocols and their functional components, overlays, middleware, etc.—cannot be sufficiently adapted at runtime: parameter adaptation is common practice, but the replacement of a mechanism by one that is functionally similar yet more appropriate—for the benefit of performance and quality—is rare. Those rare cases are tediously engineered case by case since on-the-fly transitions between similar mechanisms are not promoted by today’s Internet construction principles. In light of the considerations above, the present whitepaper advocates mechanism transitions as a fundamental new principle for the Internet and makes inroads into its modeling and specification. The quest for a fundamentally more flexible Internet is not only fueled by trends regarding users and applications ‘above’, but also by innovations in the network technology ‘below’: Software-defined systems and networks emerge as an enabling technology for more flexibility, but cannot be sufficiently leveraged for more flexibility in the Internet as a whole. The German Collaborative Research Center MAKI investigates appropriate models, concepts and methods as well as prerequisites and benefits in regard to mechanism transitions in the Future Internet. The present whitepaper comprises approaches to the modeling and specification of such mechanism transitions, both from a structural and a behavioral perspective, as developed over the last three years. The various other aspects of MAKI, such as investigations of particular sets of mechanism or monitoring and control aspects, are not covered here. The whitepaper starts by providing a more detailed discussion of the quest for Internet mechanism transitions and of related issues. It continues by introducing the basic MAKI architecture and terminology in comparison to those of the OSI standard and the Internet. In the sequel, different approaches to the general structural and behavioral modeling and specification of mechanism transitions are presented, as developed and used in MAKI. The presented research contributions were created with different purposes and focuses in mind; they represent important steps forward on our path towards a consolidated framework for mechanism transitions. In other words, they make inroads into a highly dynamic Future Internet that can cope with ever increasing dynamics. We will use terminology from the ISO OSI standard as a starting point for introducing our terms and concepts. For readers with limited knowledge in this underlying standard, we provide a short OSI terminology primer in the appendix.

Series Name: Technical report
Volume: TUD-CS-2016-0167
Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Divisions: 18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology
18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology > Institute of Computer Engineering > Real-Time Systems
18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology > Institute of Computer Engineering
18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology > Institute for Telecommunications
18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology > Institute for Telecommunications > Communications Engineering
20 Department of Computer Science
20 Department of Computer Science > Algorithmics
20 Department of Computer Science > Databases and Distributed Systems
20 Department of Computer Science > Telecooperation
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio)
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio) > Collaborative Research Centres
Zentrale Einrichtungen
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio) > Collaborative Research Centres > CRC 1053: MAKI – Multi-Mechanisms Adaptation for the Future Internet
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio) > Collaborative Research Centres > CRC 1053: MAKI – Multi-Mechanisms Adaptation for the Future Internet > A: Construction Methodology
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio) > Collaborative Research Centres > CRC 1053: MAKI – Multi-Mechanisms Adaptation for the Future Internet > A: Construction Methodology > Subproject A1: Modelling
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio) > Collaborative Research Centres > CRC 1053: MAKI – Multi-Mechanisms Adaptation for the Future Internet > A: Construction Methodology > Subproject A2: Design
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio) > Collaborative Research Centres > CRC 1053: MAKI – Multi-Mechanisms Adaptation for the Future Internet > A: Construction Methodology > Subproject A4: Self-Adaptation
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio) > Collaborative Research Centres > CRC 1053: MAKI – Multi-Mechanisms Adaptation for the Future Internet > B: Adaptation Mechanisms
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio) > Collaborative Research Centres > CRC 1053: MAKI – Multi-Mechanisms Adaptation for the Future Internet > B: Adaptation Mechanisms > Subpproject B1: Monitoring and Analysis
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio) > Collaborative Research Centres > CRC 1053: MAKI – Multi-Mechanisms Adaptation for the Future Internet > B: Adaptation Mechanisms > Teilprojekt B2: Planung und Koordination
DFG-Collaborative Research Centres (incl. Transregio) > Collaborative Research Centres > CRC 1053: MAKI – Multi-Mechanisms Adaptation for the Future Internet > B: Adaptation Mechanisms > Subproject B3: Economics of Adaption
Date Deposited: 27 Mar 2016 19:55
Official URL: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/5370
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-53701
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