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Characterization of ion-induced radiation effects in nuclear materials using synchrotron x-ray techniques

Lang, Maik and Tracy, Cameron L. and Palomares, Raul I. and Zhang, Fuxiang and Severin, Daniel and Bender, Markus and Trautmann, Christina and Park, Changyong and Prakapenka, Vitali B. and Skuratov, Vladimir A. and Ewing, Rodney C. (2015):
Characterization of ion-induced radiation effects in nuclear materials using synchrotron x-ray techniques.
In: Journal of Materials Research, Cambridge University Press, New York, USA, pp. 1366-1379, 30, (09), ISSN 0884-2914,
[Online-Edition: http://dx.doi.org/10.1557/jmr.2015.6],
[Article]

Abstract

Recent efforts to characterize the nanoscale structural and chemical modifications induced by energetic ion irradiation in nuclear materials have greatly benefited from the application of synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. Key to the study of actinide-bearing materials has been the use of small sample volumes, which are particularly advantageous, as the small quantities minimize the level of radiation exposure at the ion-beam and synchrotron user facility. This approach utilizes energetic heavy ions (energy range: 100 MeV-3 GeV) that pass completely through the sample thickness and deposit an almost constant energy per unit length along their trajectory. High energy x-rays (25-65 keV) from intense synchrotron light sources are then used in transmission geometry to analyze ion-induced structural and chemical modifications throughout the ion tracks. We describe in detail the experimental approach for utilizing synchrotron radiation (SR) to study the radiation response of a range of nuclear materials (e.g., ThO2 and Gd2TixZr2-xO7). Also addressed is the use of high-pressure techniques, such as the heatable diamond anvil cell, as a new means to expose irradiated materials to well-controlled high-temperature (up to 1000 degrees C) and/or high-pressure (up to 50 GPa) conditions. This is particularly useful for characterizing the annealing kinetics of irradiation-induced material modifications.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2015
Creators: Lang, Maik and Tracy, Cameron L. and Palomares, Raul I. and Zhang, Fuxiang and Severin, Daniel and Bender, Markus and Trautmann, Christina and Park, Changyong and Prakapenka, Vitali B. and Skuratov, Vladimir A. and Ewing, Rodney C.
Title: Characterization of ion-induced radiation effects in nuclear materials using synchrotron x-ray techniques
Language: English
Abstract:

Recent efforts to characterize the nanoscale structural and chemical modifications induced by energetic ion irradiation in nuclear materials have greatly benefited from the application of synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. Key to the study of actinide-bearing materials has been the use of small sample volumes, which are particularly advantageous, as the small quantities minimize the level of radiation exposure at the ion-beam and synchrotron user facility. This approach utilizes energetic heavy ions (energy range: 100 MeV-3 GeV) that pass completely through the sample thickness and deposit an almost constant energy per unit length along their trajectory. High energy x-rays (25-65 keV) from intense synchrotron light sources are then used in transmission geometry to analyze ion-induced structural and chemical modifications throughout the ion tracks. We describe in detail the experimental approach for utilizing synchrotron radiation (SR) to study the radiation response of a range of nuclear materials (e.g., ThO2 and Gd2TixZr2-xO7). Also addressed is the use of high-pressure techniques, such as the heatable diamond anvil cell, as a new means to expose irradiated materials to well-controlled high-temperature (up to 1000 degrees C) and/or high-pressure (up to 50 GPa) conditions. This is particularly useful for characterizing the annealing kinetics of irradiation-induced material modifications.

Journal or Publication Title: Journal of Materials Research
Volume: 30
Number: 09
Publisher: Cambridge University Press, New York, USA
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Ion-Beam-Modified Materials
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
Date Deposited: 29 Feb 2016 13:33
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1557/jmr.2015.6
Identification Number: doi:10.1557/jmr.2015.6
Funders: This work was supported as part of the Materials Science of Actinides, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award #DE-SC0001089., HPCAT operations are supported by DOE-NNSA under Award #DE-NA0001974 and DOE-BES under Award #DE-FG02-99ER45775, with partial instrumentation funding by NSF., HPCAT beamtime was granted by the Carnegie/DOE Alliance Center (CDAC)., GeoSoilEnviroCARS is supported by the National Science Foundation - Earth Sciences (EAR-1128799) and Department of Energy - GeoSciences (DE-FG02-94ER14466)., This research used resources of the Advanced Photon Source, a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility operated for the DOE Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.
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