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Land use intensification alters ecosystem multifunctionality via loss of biodiversity and changes to functional composition.

Allan, Eric ; Manning, Pete ; Alt, Fabian ; Binkenstein, Julia ; Blaser, Stefan ; Blüthgen, Nico ; Böhm, Stefan ; Grassein, Fabrice ; Hölzel, Norbert ; Klaus, Valentin H. ; Kleinebecker, Till ; Morris, E. Kathryn ; Oelmann, Yvonne ; Prati, Daniel ; Renner, Swen C. ; Rillig, Matthias C. ; Schaefer, Martin ; Schloter, Michael ; Schmitt, Barbara ; Schöning, Ingo ; Schrumpf, Marion ; Solly, Emily ; Sorkau, Elisabeth ; Steckel, Juliane ; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf ; Stempfhuber, Barbara ; Tschapka, Marco ; Weiner, Christiane N. ; Weisser, Wolfgang W. ; Werner, Michael ; Westphal, Catrin ; Wilcke, Wolfgang ; Fischer, Markus (2015):
Land use intensification alters ecosystem multifunctionality via loss of biodiversity and changes to functional composition.
In: Ecology letters, 18 (8), pp. 834-43. ISSN 1461-0248,
[Article]

Abstract

Global change, especially land-use intensification, affects human well-being by impacting the delivery of multiple ecosystem services (multifunctionality). However, whether biodiversity loss is a major component of global change effects on multifunctionality in real-world ecosystems, as in experimental ones, remains unclear. Therefore, we assessed biodiversity, functional composition and 14 ecosystem services on 150 agricultural grasslands differing in land-use intensity. We also introduce five multifunctionality measures in which ecosystem services were weighted according to realistic land-use objectives. We found that indirect land-use effects, i.e. those mediated by biodiversity loss and by changes to functional composition, were as strong as direct effects on average. Their strength varied with land-use objectives and regional context. Biodiversity loss explained indirect effects in a region of intermediate productivity and was most damaging when land-use objectives favoured supporting and cultural services. In contrast, functional composition shifts, towards fast-growing plant species, strongly increased provisioning services in more inherently unproductive grasslands.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2015
Creators: Allan, Eric ; Manning, Pete ; Alt, Fabian ; Binkenstein, Julia ; Blaser, Stefan ; Blüthgen, Nico ; Böhm, Stefan ; Grassein, Fabrice ; Hölzel, Norbert ; Klaus, Valentin H. ; Kleinebecker, Till ; Morris, E. Kathryn ; Oelmann, Yvonne ; Prati, Daniel ; Renner, Swen C. ; Rillig, Matthias C. ; Schaefer, Martin ; Schloter, Michael ; Schmitt, Barbara ; Schöning, Ingo ; Schrumpf, Marion ; Solly, Emily ; Sorkau, Elisabeth ; Steckel, Juliane ; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf ; Stempfhuber, Barbara ; Tschapka, Marco ; Weiner, Christiane N. ; Weisser, Wolfgang W. ; Werner, Michael ; Westphal, Catrin ; Wilcke, Wolfgang ; Fischer, Markus
Title: Land use intensification alters ecosystem multifunctionality via loss of biodiversity and changes to functional composition.
Language: English
Abstract:

Global change, especially land-use intensification, affects human well-being by impacting the delivery of multiple ecosystem services (multifunctionality). However, whether biodiversity loss is a major component of global change effects on multifunctionality in real-world ecosystems, as in experimental ones, remains unclear. Therefore, we assessed biodiversity, functional composition and 14 ecosystem services on 150 agricultural grasslands differing in land-use intensity. We also introduce five multifunctionality measures in which ecosystem services were weighted according to realistic land-use objectives. We found that indirect land-use effects, i.e. those mediated by biodiversity loss and by changes to functional composition, were as strong as direct effects on average. Their strength varied with land-use objectives and regional context. Biodiversity loss explained indirect effects in a region of intermediate productivity and was most damaging when land-use objectives favoured supporting and cultural services. In contrast, functional composition shifts, towards fast-growing plant species, strongly increased provisioning services in more inherently unproductive grasslands.

Journal or Publication Title: Ecology letters
Journal volume: 18
Number: 8
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology
10 Department of Biology > Synthetic Ecological Networks
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2015 12:41
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