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Mathematical Modeling of Moving Contact Lines in Heat Transfer Applications

Ajaev, V. S. and Klentzman, J. and Sodtke, C. and Stephan, Peter (2007):
Mathematical Modeling of Moving Contact Lines in Heat Transfer Applications.
In: Proceedings 2nd Int. Topical Team Workshop on Two-Phase Systems for Ground and Space Applications, [Conference or Workshop Item]

Abstract

We provide an overview of research on the mathematical modeling of apparent contact lines in non-isothermal systems conducted over the past several decades and report a number of recent developments in the field. The latter involve developing mathematical models of evaporating liquid droplets that account not only for liquid flow and evaporation, but also for unsteady heat conduction in the substrate. The droplet is placed on a flat heated solid substrate and is assumed to be in contact with a saturated vapor. Furthermore, we discuss a careful comparison between mathematical models and experimental work that involves simultaneous measurement of shapes of evaporating droplets and temperature profiles in the solid substrate. The latter is accomplished using thermochromic liquid crystals. Applications to new research areas, such as studies of the effect of evaporation on fingering instabilities in gravity-driven liquid films, are also discussed.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Erschienen: 2007
Creators: Ajaev, V. S. and Klentzman, J. and Sodtke, C. and Stephan, Peter
Title: Mathematical Modeling of Moving Contact Lines in Heat Transfer Applications
Language: English
Abstract:

We provide an overview of research on the mathematical modeling of apparent contact lines in non-isothermal systems conducted over the past several decades and report a number of recent developments in the field. The latter involve developing mathematical models of evaporating liquid droplets that account not only for liquid flow and evaporation, but also for unsteady heat conduction in the substrate. The droplet is placed on a flat heated solid substrate and is assumed to be in contact with a saturated vapor. Furthermore, we discuss a careful comparison between mathematical models and experimental work that involves simultaneous measurement of shapes of evaporating droplets and temperature profiles in the solid substrate. The latter is accomplished using thermochromic liquid crystals. Applications to new research areas, such as studies of the effect of evaporation on fingering instabilities in gravity-driven liquid films, are also discussed.

Divisions: 16 Department of Mechanical Engineering
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Institute for Technical Thermodynamics (TTD)
Event Title: Proceedings 2nd Int. Topical Team Workshop on Two-Phase Systems for Ground and Space Applications
Date Deposited: 26 Feb 2015 16:19
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