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Visual observations of flow structure and melting front morphology in horizontal ice plate melting from above into a mixture

Sugawara, M. and Tamura, E. and Satoh, Y. and Komatsu, Y. and Tago, M. and Beer, Hans (2007):
Visual observations of flow structure and melting front morphology in horizontal ice plate melting from above into a mixture.
In: Heat and Mass Transfer, 43 (10), pp. 1009-1018. ISSN 0947-7411,
[Article]

Abstract

Visual observations reveal a complicated flow in the liquid melt and a melting front configuration resulting from horizontal ice plate melting from above into a 20 wt% calcium chloride aqueous solution. The initial temperature of the ice plate and the mixture are both -5°C. Small scale ``mountain and valley'' structures (∼1 mm) appear on the flat melting front just after melting begins, which have been called ``sharkskin''. Innumerable upward and downward flows appear near the sharkskin and are controlled by its ``mountain and valley'' structure. These typical flows will considerably promote the melting of the ice plate to be 30% larger as compared to the numerically predicted results assuming a flat melting front (i.e., without the sharkskin), and also by three times larger compared with the results for melting from below.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2007
Creators: Sugawara, M. and Tamura, E. and Satoh, Y. and Komatsu, Y. and Tago, M. and Beer, Hans
Title: Visual observations of flow structure and melting front morphology in horizontal ice plate melting from above into a mixture
Language: English
Abstract:

Visual observations reveal a complicated flow in the liquid melt and a melting front configuration resulting from horizontal ice plate melting from above into a 20 wt% calcium chloride aqueous solution. The initial temperature of the ice plate and the mixture are both -5°C. Small scale ``mountain and valley'' structures (∼1 mm) appear on the flat melting front just after melting begins, which have been called ``sharkskin''. Innumerable upward and downward flows appear near the sharkskin and are controlled by its ``mountain and valley'' structure. These typical flows will considerably promote the melting of the ice plate to be 30% larger as compared to the numerically predicted results assuming a flat melting front (i.e., without the sharkskin), and also by three times larger compared with the results for melting from below.

Journal or Publication Title: Heat and Mass Transfer
Journal volume: 43
Number: 10
Divisions: 16 Department of Mechanical Engineering
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Institute for Technical Thermodynamics (TTD)
Date Deposited: 26 Feb 2015 16:18
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00231-006-0175-x
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