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Inkjet Printed, High Mobility Inorganic-Oxide Field Effect Transistors Processed at Room Temperature

Dasgupta, Subho and Kruk, Robert and Mechau, Norman and Hahn, Horst (2011):
Inkjet Printed, High Mobility Inorganic-Oxide Field Effect Transistors Processed at Room Temperature.
5, In: ACS Nano, (12), ACS Publications, pp. 9628-9638, ISSN 1936-0851, [Online-Edition: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn202992v],
[Article]

Abstract

Printed electronics (PE) represents any electronic devices, components or circuits that can be processed using modern-day printing techniques. Field-effect transistors (FETs) and logics are being printed with intended applications requiring simple circuitry on large, flexible (e.g., polymer) substrates for low-cost and disposable electronics. Although organic materials have commonly been chosen for their easy printability and low temperature processability, high quality inorganic oxide-semiconductors are also being considered recently. The intrinsic mobility of the inorganic semiconductors are always by far superior than the organic ones; however, the commonly expressed reservations against the inorganic-based printed electronics are due to major issues, such as high processing temperatures and their incompatibility with solution-processing. Here we show a possibility to circumvent these difficulties and demonstrate a room-temperature processed and inkjet printed inorganic-oxide FET where the transistor channel is composed of an interconnected nanoparticle network and a solid polymer electrolyte serves as the dielectric. Even an extremely conservative estimation of the field-effect mobility of such a device yields a value of 0.8 cm2/(V s), which is still exceptionally large for a room temperature processed and printed transistor from inorganic materials.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2011
Creators: Dasgupta, Subho and Kruk, Robert and Mechau, Norman and Hahn, Horst
Title: Inkjet Printed, High Mobility Inorganic-Oxide Field Effect Transistors Processed at Room Temperature
Language: English
Abstract:

Printed electronics (PE) represents any electronic devices, components or circuits that can be processed using modern-day printing techniques. Field-effect transistors (FETs) and logics are being printed with intended applications requiring simple circuitry on large, flexible (e.g., polymer) substrates for low-cost and disposable electronics. Although organic materials have commonly been chosen for their easy printability and low temperature processability, high quality inorganic oxide-semiconductors are also being considered recently. The intrinsic mobility of the inorganic semiconductors are always by far superior than the organic ones; however, the commonly expressed reservations against the inorganic-based printed electronics are due to major issues, such as high processing temperatures and their incompatibility with solution-processing. Here we show a possibility to circumvent these difficulties and demonstrate a room-temperature processed and inkjet printed inorganic-oxide FET where the transistor channel is composed of an interconnected nanoparticle network and a solid polymer electrolyte serves as the dielectric. Even an extremely conservative estimation of the field-effect mobility of such a device yields a value of 0.8 cm2/(V s), which is still exceptionally large for a room temperature processed and printed transistor from inorganic materials.

Journal or Publication Title: ACS Nano
Volume: 5
Number: 12
Publisher: ACS Publications
Uncontrolled Keywords: printed electronics; inorganic oxide FET; nanoparticle channel transistor; electrochemical gating; high mobility; room temperature processing
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Joint Research Laboratory Nanomaterials
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
Date Deposited: 19 Feb 2013 09:14
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nn202992v
Identification Number: doi:10.1021/nn202992v
Funders: The authors acknowledge financial support by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under contract HA1344/25-1, by the Center for Functional Nanostructures (CFN) project D4.4, and by the State of Hesse for a major equipment grant for the Joint Research Laboratory Nanomaterials.
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