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Response behavior of ZrO2 under swift heavy ion irradiation with and without external pressure

Schuster, B. and Fujara, F. and Merk, B. and Neumann, R. and Seidl, Tim and Trautmann, C. (2012):
Response behavior of ZrO2 under swift heavy ion irradiation with and without external pressure.
277, In: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms, Elsevier Science Publishing Company, pp. 45-52, [Online-Edition: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168583X11...],
[Article]

Abstract

In this study, we demonstrate that the combination of relativistic heavy ions with pressure can influence the phase behavior of ZrO2 in ways none of those two extreme conditions alone could. The response behavior of ZrO2 towards ion irradiation under different pressure conditions is investigated. ZrO2 exposed to energetic particles is known to undergo a crystalline-to-crystalline phase transition from the monoclinic to the tetragonal phase. In agreement with earlier findings, this structural change requires also for heaviest ions, such as Au, Pb, and U, a multiple ion impact. If the irradiation is performed under high pressure, the monoclinic-to-tetragonal transformation occurs at a fluence that is more than one order of magnitude lower suggesting a single impact process. Raman measurements at ambient conditions and X-ray diffraction analysis of the samples irradiated under pressure revealed that the monoclinic-to-tetragonal transformation under pressure is not a direct process but involves a transition into the cubic high-temperature structure, before the tetragonal structure becomes stable under decompression. At even higher pressures, the additional ion irradiation forces ZrO2 to transform to the higher orthorhombic-II phase that is far away from its stability field.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2012
Creators: Schuster, B. and Fujara, F. and Merk, B. and Neumann, R. and Seidl, Tim and Trautmann, C.
Title: Response behavior of ZrO2 under swift heavy ion irradiation with and without external pressure
Language: English
Abstract:

In this study, we demonstrate that the combination of relativistic heavy ions with pressure can influence the phase behavior of ZrO2 in ways none of those two extreme conditions alone could. The response behavior of ZrO2 towards ion irradiation under different pressure conditions is investigated. ZrO2 exposed to energetic particles is known to undergo a crystalline-to-crystalline phase transition from the monoclinic to the tetragonal phase. In agreement with earlier findings, this structural change requires also for heaviest ions, such as Au, Pb, and U, a multiple ion impact. If the irradiation is performed under high pressure, the monoclinic-to-tetragonal transformation occurs at a fluence that is more than one order of magnitude lower suggesting a single impact process. Raman measurements at ambient conditions and X-ray diffraction analysis of the samples irradiated under pressure revealed that the monoclinic-to-tetragonal transformation under pressure is not a direct process but involves a transition into the cubic high-temperature structure, before the tetragonal structure becomes stable under decompression. At even higher pressures, the additional ion irradiation forces ZrO2 to transform to the higher orthorhombic-II phase that is far away from its stability field.

Journal or Publication Title: Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms
Volume: 277
Publisher: Elsevier Science Publishing Company
Uncontrolled Keywords: High-pressure, Ion irradiation, Phase transformation, Raman spectroscopy, Synchrotron X-ray, Zirconia (ZrO2)
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science > Material Analytics
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Material Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
Date Deposited: 30 May 2012 13:47
Official URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168583X11...
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