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Light-repressible receptor protein kinase: a novel photo-regulated gene from Arabidopsis thaliana.

Deeken, R. and Kaldenhoff, Ralf :
Light-repressible receptor protein kinase: a novel photo-regulated gene from Arabidopsis thaliana.
In: Planta, 202 (4) pp. 479-86. ISSN 0032-0935
[Article] , (1997)

Abstract

To identify light-regulated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. a clone was isolated which contains a cDNA fragment with sequence similarity to receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs). Sequence analysis of the corresponding genomic DNA as well as determination of transcribed regions revealed that the gene comprises 12 exons. Sections of the deduced polypeptide exhibit homologies with kinase domains and the entire protein possesses structural features indicating that it is a novel member of the RLK family. The protein consists of a signal peptide, a putative receptor site including a leucine zipper region with a new motif, a transmembrane helix and 11 subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine kinases. The gene is designated light-repressible receptor protein kinase (lrrpk), as the specific mRNA is predominantly expressed in the absence of light. The lrrpk mRNA steady-state levels were assessed by competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and found to be very low after light pulses, irrespective of the wavelength applied. Blue light was least effective in this respect, and the repression was not reversible by far-red light. Employment of in-situ RT-PCR revealed elevated lrrpk mRNA levels in the cotyledons of etiolated seedlings. The mRNA was also increased in the outer regions of the roots of greenhouse-grown A. thaliana, but was not detectable in any other part of the plants. An explanation of the relatively low lrrpk mRNA levels and the photophobic expression of the gene could be the finding that in the 5' upstream region of the lrrpk gene sequence elements are present that are similar to those identified in promoters of phytochrome A genes.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 1997
Creators: Deeken, R. and Kaldenhoff, Ralf
Title: Light-repressible receptor protein kinase: a novel photo-regulated gene from Arabidopsis thaliana.
Language: English
Abstract:

To identify light-regulated genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. a clone was isolated which contains a cDNA fragment with sequence similarity to receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs). Sequence analysis of the corresponding genomic DNA as well as determination of transcribed regions revealed that the gene comprises 12 exons. Sections of the deduced polypeptide exhibit homologies with kinase domains and the entire protein possesses structural features indicating that it is a novel member of the RLK family. The protein consists of a signal peptide, a putative receptor site including a leucine zipper region with a new motif, a transmembrane helix and 11 subdomains characteristic of serine/threonine kinases. The gene is designated light-repressible receptor protein kinase (lrrpk), as the specific mRNA is predominantly expressed in the absence of light. The lrrpk mRNA steady-state levels were assessed by competitive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and found to be very low after light pulses, irrespective of the wavelength applied. Blue light was least effective in this respect, and the repression was not reversible by far-red light. Employment of in-situ RT-PCR revealed elevated lrrpk mRNA levels in the cotyledons of etiolated seedlings. The mRNA was also increased in the outer regions of the roots of greenhouse-grown A. thaliana, but was not detectable in any other part of the plants. An explanation of the relatively low lrrpk mRNA levels and the photophobic expression of the gene could be the finding that in the 5' upstream region of the lrrpk gene sequence elements are present that are similar to those identified in promoters of phytochrome A genes.

Journal or Publication Title: Planta
Volume: 202
Number: 4
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology > Applied Plant Sciences
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10 Department of Biology
Date Deposited: 31 Aug 2011 13:13
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