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Fuel Effects in Turbulent Premixed Pre-vaporised Alcohol/Air Jet Flames

Trabold, J. and Hartl, S. and Walther, S. and Johchi, A. and Dreizler, A. and Geyer, D. (2020):
Fuel Effects in Turbulent Premixed Pre-vaporised Alcohol/Air Jet Flames.
In: Flow, Turbulence and Combustion, ISSN 1573-1987,
DOI: 10.1007/s10494-020-00166-6,
[Article]

Abstract

To study combustion fundamentals of complex fuels under well-defined boundary conditions, a novel Temperature Controlled Jet Burner (TCJB) system is designed that can stabilise both gaseous or pre-vaporised liquid fuels. In a first experimental exploratory study, piloted turbulent jet flames of pre-vaporised methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol and 2-butanol mixtures are compared to methane/air as a reference fuel. Complementary one-dimensional laminar flame calculations are used to provide flame parameters for comparison. Blow-off and flame length as global flame characteristics are measured over a wide range of equivalence ratios. For fuel rich conditions, blow-off limits correlate well with extinction strain rate calculations. Differing flame lengths from lean to rich conditions are explained partly by different flame wrinkling that is assessed using planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of the hydroxyl radical (OH-PLIF). A study of Lewis-number effects indicates that they have substantial influence on flame wrinkling. Lean alcohol/air flames, opposed to methane/air, have a Lewis-number greater than unity. This impedes curvature development, which promotes relatively large flame lengths. In contrast, across stoichiometric conditions, all alcohol/air mixture Lewis-numbers decrease significantly. At such conditions, alcohol/air flames show alike or even larger wrinkling compared to methane/air flames. However, quantitatively, the differences in flame length and wrinkling observed among the flames can neither be explained alone by Lewis-number differences, nor other global mixture parameters available from 1D laminar flame calculations. This study shall therefore emphasise the need for more detailed experimental analyses of the full thermochemical state of laminar and turbulent flames fuelled with complex fuels.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2020
Creators: Trabold, J. and Hartl, S. and Walther, S. and Johchi, A. and Dreizler, A. and Geyer, D.
Title: Fuel Effects in Turbulent Premixed Pre-vaporised Alcohol/Air Jet Flames
Language: English
Abstract:

To study combustion fundamentals of complex fuels under well-defined boundary conditions, a novel Temperature Controlled Jet Burner (TCJB) system is designed that can stabilise both gaseous or pre-vaporised liquid fuels. In a first experimental exploratory study, piloted turbulent jet flames of pre-vaporised methanol, ethanol, 2-propanol and 2-butanol mixtures are compared to methane/air as a reference fuel. Complementary one-dimensional laminar flame calculations are used to provide flame parameters for comparison. Blow-off and flame length as global flame characteristics are measured over a wide range of equivalence ratios. For fuel rich conditions, blow-off limits correlate well with extinction strain rate calculations. Differing flame lengths from lean to rich conditions are explained partly by different flame wrinkling that is assessed using planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of the hydroxyl radical (OH-PLIF). A study of Lewis-number effects indicates that they have substantial influence on flame wrinkling. Lean alcohol/air flames, opposed to methane/air, have a Lewis-number greater than unity. This impedes curvature development, which promotes relatively large flame lengths. In contrast, across stoichiometric conditions, all alcohol/air mixture Lewis-numbers decrease significantly. At such conditions, alcohol/air flames show alike or even larger wrinkling compared to methane/air flames. However, quantitatively, the differences in flame length and wrinkling observed among the flames can neither be explained alone by Lewis-number differences, nor other global mixture parameters available from 1D laminar flame calculations. This study shall therefore emphasise the need for more detailed experimental analyses of the full thermochemical state of laminar and turbulent flames fuelled with complex fuels.

Journal or Publication Title: Flow, Turbulence and Combustion
Divisions: 16 Department of Mechanical Engineering
Profile Areas
Profile Areas > Thermo-Fluids & Interfaces
16 Department of Mechanical Engineering > Institute of Reactive Flows and Diagnostics (RSM)
Date Deposited: 23 Jul 2020 05:27
DOI: 10.1007/s10494-020-00166-6
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10494-020-00166-6
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