TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

The Use of Metal Oxide Semiconductors for THz Spectroscopy of Biological Applications

Hartnagel, H. L. and Sirkeli, V. P. Tiginyanu, Ion and Sontea, Victor and Railean, Serghei (eds.) (2020):
The Use of Metal Oxide Semiconductors for THz Spectroscopy of Biological Applications.
In: 4th International Conference on Nanotechnologies and Biomedical Engineering, Chisinau, Republic of Moldova, September 18-21, 2019, pp. 213-217, ISBN 978-3-030-31866-6,
[Conference or Workshop Item]

Abstract

Terahertz (THz) waves refer to the electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range from 0.1 to 10 THz, which corresponds to the wavelengths from 3 mm to 30 µm, respectively. This spectral region, called also as ``T-gap'', is important for many practical applications, including THz imaging, chemical and biological sensing, high-speed telecommunication, security and medical applications. THz waves have low photon energies (~4.1 meV for 1 THz), which is about 1 million times weaker than the energy of X-ray photons. They do neither ignite any explosive materials at typical power levels nor cause any harmful ionization in biological tissues. The terahertz radiation is strongly attenuated by water and is very sensitive to water content. Unique THz absorption spectra caused by intermolecular vibrations in this spectral region have been found in different biological materials and tissues. Thus, Terahertz spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for characterization of a great many bio molecules and tissues. All these applications require relatively high power terahertz sources with milliwatt-level output power, which could operate at room temperature. Despite great progress, made in the last few years of design, fabrication and demonstration, THz devices based on GaAs/AlGaAs materials, there are some limits of bandgap engineering due to the relatively low (0.72 eV for GaAs/AlAs) conduction band offset, and most terahertz sources with one milliwatt-power like quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) require cryogenic cooling down to less than 200 K. To overcome the issue the new material systems such as metal oxide materials are considered as promising for room-temperature THz sources. The interest in terahertz imaging and spectroscopy of biologically related applications is increasing more and more within the last few years. This paper provides a review and current status of using metal oxide materials for THz spectroscopy, and recent advances in terahertz spectroscopy techniques in biological and medical applications.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Erschienen: 2020
Editors: Tiginyanu, Ion and Sontea, Victor and Railean, Serghei
Creators: Hartnagel, H. L. and Sirkeli, V. P.
Title: The Use of Metal Oxide Semiconductors for THz Spectroscopy of Biological Applications
Language: English
Abstract:

Terahertz (THz) waves refer to the electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range from 0.1 to 10 THz, which corresponds to the wavelengths from 3 mm to 30 µm, respectively. This spectral region, called also as ``T-gap'', is important for many practical applications, including THz imaging, chemical and biological sensing, high-speed telecommunication, security and medical applications. THz waves have low photon energies (~4.1 meV for 1 THz), which is about 1 million times weaker than the energy of X-ray photons. They do neither ignite any explosive materials at typical power levels nor cause any harmful ionization in biological tissues. The terahertz radiation is strongly attenuated by water and is very sensitive to water content. Unique THz absorption spectra caused by intermolecular vibrations in this spectral region have been found in different biological materials and tissues. Thus, Terahertz spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for characterization of a great many bio molecules and tissues. All these applications require relatively high power terahertz sources with milliwatt-level output power, which could operate at room temperature. Despite great progress, made in the last few years of design, fabrication and demonstration, THz devices based on GaAs/AlGaAs materials, there are some limits of bandgap engineering due to the relatively low (0.72 eV for GaAs/AlAs) conduction band offset, and most terahertz sources with one milliwatt-power like quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) require cryogenic cooling down to less than 200 K. To overcome the issue the new material systems such as metal oxide materials are considered as promising for room-temperature THz sources. The interest in terahertz imaging and spectroscopy of biologically related applications is increasing more and more within the last few years. This paper provides a review and current status of using metal oxide materials for THz spectroscopy, and recent advances in terahertz spectroscopy techniques in biological and medical applications.

ISBN: 978-3-030-31866-6
Divisions: 18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology
18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology > Microwave Electronics
18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology > Institute for Microwave Engineering and Photonics
Event Title: 4th International Conference on Nanotechnologies and Biomedical Engineering
Event Location: Chisinau, Republic of Moldova
Event Dates: September 18-21, 2019
Date Deposited: 23 Oct 2019 09:42
Export:
Suche nach Titel in: TUfind oder in Google
Send an inquiry Send an inquiry

Options (only for editors)

View Item View Item