TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Managing biological control for fruit production in different European climates

Happe, Anne-Kathrin (2019):
Managing biological control for fruit production in different European climates.
Darmstadt, TUprints, Technische Universität, [Online-Edition: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/8636],
[Ph.D. Thesis]

Abstract

Biological pest control in apple orchards is essential and depends on effective and sustainable agricultural management strategies at local and landscape scales. Local measures such as hedgerows, flowering strips, organic management as well as landscapes with a high diversity of cover types and low land-use intensity are assumed to support biological control specifically and ecosystem services in general. However, the influence of local measures, landscape characteristics and their interactions has rarely been studied in perennial crop systems across large latitudinal gradients. Studying ecosystem services across climatic regions is especially important in the face of climate change and induced shifts in species distribution. The present study assesses the effects of local and landscape factors on predatory arthropods and their prey, and on trade-offs between ecosystem services and fruit production in the intensive fruit production systems of three European countries. Local factors included quality of the adjacent habitat (e.g. cover of woody habitat and plant species richness) and two types of orchard management: integrated production (IP; based on the reduced and targeted application of synthetic agrochemicals) and organic management practices. Landscape factors included the amount of orchard cover in the surrounding landscape as a proxy for land-use intensity and landscape diversity. For three years I studied arthropod communities in 30 apple orchards in Germany, with a special focus on natural enemies and herbivores and their impact on tree health and fruit production. I analyzed data from these orchards and from 28 orchards in Spain and 28 orchards in Sweden, provided by collaborators working on the same European BiodivERsA project. As a member of a 17-scientist team, I investigated how agri-environmental schemes, management practices, and landscape composition can be enhanced to support (I) ecosystem services and biodiversity in general, (II) communities of predatory arthropods, and (III) specific predatory arthropod taxa. The first publication (Chapter 2) offers an insight into the complex interactions of functional groups of arthropods (pollinators, predators, and pests) and their influence on fruit production in different environments. It presents natural enemies and their prey in the context of ecosystem service trade-offs. In cooperation with the project partners, I studied the effects of local and landscape factors on functional groups and their services and disservices in 86 European apple orchards in Germany, Sweden, and Spain, during one growing season (from March to October 2015) under a common study design and sampling protocol. Key functions of ecosystem service providers are biological pest control and pollination. Disservices are defined as fruit damage at harvest, and aphid infestation of target trees. Final yield (fruit production and seed set) is assessed as the ultimate measure for ecosystem service provisioning. Using structural equation models, we tested for trade-offs between ecosystem services and for effects of local and landscape variables. Across Europe organic management benefited natural enemies. Higher abundance of natural enemies in organic orchards partly compensated for higher fruit damage and lower yield in these systems. There was no general positive influence of agri-environmental schemes such as hedgerows or flower strips on natural enemies. However, a high flower cover in the understory indirectly increased final fruit yield by improving living conditions for wild bees. Diversity of beneficial arthropods was lower in landscapes with high land-use intensity. The second publication (Chapter 3) focuses on natural enemy communities in apple orchards across all three countries and differences in their responses to local and landscape factors. Together with partners in Spain, Sweden, and Germany, I give a closer look on each of seven groups of predatory arthropods: spiders (Araneae), beetles (Coleoptera), earwigs (Dermaptera), flies (Diptera), bugs (Heteroptera), lacewings (Neuroptera) and harvestmen (Opiliones). In 2015, we took beating samples in all 86 apple orchards to assess the abundance of predatory arthropods. Additionally, we calculated community energy use as a proxy for the communities’ predation potential based on biomass and metabolic rates of predatory arthropods. In both IP and organic orchards, we detected contradicting influences of local and landscape factors on the studied predator groups. Organic management enhanced abundances of five out of seven predatory arthropod groups. It benefited spiders, beetles, earwigs, flies, and bugs, but the response was not consistent across countries. High local woody habitat cover enhanced earwig abundance in Sweden but not in Germany. Plant species richness negatively influenced bug abundance depending on country and management. Predation potential (energy use by the predator community) was higher in organic orchards in Spain but remained largely unaffected by local and landscape factors across Europe. The third publication (Chapter 4) is a case study on a single predatory arthropod group, earwigs, and one of their main prey organisms, woolly apple aphids. Earwigs are expected to be important generalist predators in apple orchards, with woolly apple aphids being a common apple pest. I studied whether local factors such as the presence of woody habitats and organic management and landscapes with low land-use intensity enhance living conditions for earwigs in intensive fruit production systems. Earwigs were sampled using shelters in 30 apple orchards in Germany (2015-2016), and 28 orchards in Spain (2015), subjected to IP or organic management. At the same time, we assessed tree infestation by woolly apple aphids. Correlation analyses served to detect possible interactions between the abundance of earwigs and the availability of potential prey organisms. The results indicate that there is only a weak correlation between abundance of earwigs and tree infestation by woolly apple aphids. Earwigs of the species Forficula auricularia seem to respond indifferently to orchard management. Presence of adjacent woody elements reduced earwig abundance in IP orchards in Germany. In Spain we found two earwig species, Forficula auricularia and F. pubescens, but only F. pubescens, which did not occur in German orchards, profited from organic management. The three different perspectives on predatory arthropods (Chapter 2-4) highlight the importance of local and landscape factors for ecosystem services in general and predatory arthropods in particular. Responses were not consistent between predator groups and countries, stressing the need to develop tailored and country-specific management schemes at the local and landscape scale beyond the promotion of organic management.

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2019
Creators: Happe, Anne-Kathrin
Title: Managing biological control for fruit production in different European climates
Language: English
Abstract:

Biological pest control in apple orchards is essential and depends on effective and sustainable agricultural management strategies at local and landscape scales. Local measures such as hedgerows, flowering strips, organic management as well as landscapes with a high diversity of cover types and low land-use intensity are assumed to support biological control specifically and ecosystem services in general. However, the influence of local measures, landscape characteristics and their interactions has rarely been studied in perennial crop systems across large latitudinal gradients. Studying ecosystem services across climatic regions is especially important in the face of climate change and induced shifts in species distribution. The present study assesses the effects of local and landscape factors on predatory arthropods and their prey, and on trade-offs between ecosystem services and fruit production in the intensive fruit production systems of three European countries. Local factors included quality of the adjacent habitat (e.g. cover of woody habitat and plant species richness) and two types of orchard management: integrated production (IP; based on the reduced and targeted application of synthetic agrochemicals) and organic management practices. Landscape factors included the amount of orchard cover in the surrounding landscape as a proxy for land-use intensity and landscape diversity. For three years I studied arthropod communities in 30 apple orchards in Germany, with a special focus on natural enemies and herbivores and their impact on tree health and fruit production. I analyzed data from these orchards and from 28 orchards in Spain and 28 orchards in Sweden, provided by collaborators working on the same European BiodivERsA project. As a member of a 17-scientist team, I investigated how agri-environmental schemes, management practices, and landscape composition can be enhanced to support (I) ecosystem services and biodiversity in general, (II) communities of predatory arthropods, and (III) specific predatory arthropod taxa. The first publication (Chapter 2) offers an insight into the complex interactions of functional groups of arthropods (pollinators, predators, and pests) and their influence on fruit production in different environments. It presents natural enemies and their prey in the context of ecosystem service trade-offs. In cooperation with the project partners, I studied the effects of local and landscape factors on functional groups and their services and disservices in 86 European apple orchards in Germany, Sweden, and Spain, during one growing season (from March to October 2015) under a common study design and sampling protocol. Key functions of ecosystem service providers are biological pest control and pollination. Disservices are defined as fruit damage at harvest, and aphid infestation of target trees. Final yield (fruit production and seed set) is assessed as the ultimate measure for ecosystem service provisioning. Using structural equation models, we tested for trade-offs between ecosystem services and for effects of local and landscape variables. Across Europe organic management benefited natural enemies. Higher abundance of natural enemies in organic orchards partly compensated for higher fruit damage and lower yield in these systems. There was no general positive influence of agri-environmental schemes such as hedgerows or flower strips on natural enemies. However, a high flower cover in the understory indirectly increased final fruit yield by improving living conditions for wild bees. Diversity of beneficial arthropods was lower in landscapes with high land-use intensity. The second publication (Chapter 3) focuses on natural enemy communities in apple orchards across all three countries and differences in their responses to local and landscape factors. Together with partners in Spain, Sweden, and Germany, I give a closer look on each of seven groups of predatory arthropods: spiders (Araneae), beetles (Coleoptera), earwigs (Dermaptera), flies (Diptera), bugs (Heteroptera), lacewings (Neuroptera) and harvestmen (Opiliones). In 2015, we took beating samples in all 86 apple orchards to assess the abundance of predatory arthropods. Additionally, we calculated community energy use as a proxy for the communities’ predation potential based on biomass and metabolic rates of predatory arthropods. In both IP and organic orchards, we detected contradicting influences of local and landscape factors on the studied predator groups. Organic management enhanced abundances of five out of seven predatory arthropod groups. It benefited spiders, beetles, earwigs, flies, and bugs, but the response was not consistent across countries. High local woody habitat cover enhanced earwig abundance in Sweden but not in Germany. Plant species richness negatively influenced bug abundance depending on country and management. Predation potential (energy use by the predator community) was higher in organic orchards in Spain but remained largely unaffected by local and landscape factors across Europe. The third publication (Chapter 4) is a case study on a single predatory arthropod group, earwigs, and one of their main prey organisms, woolly apple aphids. Earwigs are expected to be important generalist predators in apple orchards, with woolly apple aphids being a common apple pest. I studied whether local factors such as the presence of woody habitats and organic management and landscapes with low land-use intensity enhance living conditions for earwigs in intensive fruit production systems. Earwigs were sampled using shelters in 30 apple orchards in Germany (2015-2016), and 28 orchards in Spain (2015), subjected to IP or organic management. At the same time, we assessed tree infestation by woolly apple aphids. Correlation analyses served to detect possible interactions between the abundance of earwigs and the availability of potential prey organisms. The results indicate that there is only a weak correlation between abundance of earwigs and tree infestation by woolly apple aphids. Earwigs of the species Forficula auricularia seem to respond indifferently to orchard management. Presence of adjacent woody elements reduced earwig abundance in IP orchards in Germany. In Spain we found two earwig species, Forficula auricularia and F. pubescens, but only F. pubescens, which did not occur in German orchards, profited from organic management. The three different perspectives on predatory arthropods (Chapter 2-4) highlight the importance of local and landscape factors for ecosystem services in general and predatory arthropods in particular. Responses were not consistent between predator groups and countries, stressing the need to develop tailored and country-specific management schemes at the local and landscape scale beyond the promotion of organic management.

Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Publisher: TUprints
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology
10 Department of Biology > Ecological Networks
Date Deposited: 19 May 2019 19:55
Official URL: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/8636
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-86364
Referees: Mody, PD Dr. Karsten and Jürgens, Prof. Dr. Andreas
Refereed / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 12 April 2019
Alternative Abstract:
Alternative abstract Language
Biologische Schädlingsregulierung ist für eine umwelt- und ressourcenschonende Apfelproduktion unabdingbar. Ihr Erfolg ist davon abhängig, dass auf lokaler Ebene und auf Landschaftsebene Bewirtschaftungsstrategien gefunden werden, die natürliche Gegenspieler fördern, ohne dabei den Schädlingsdruck zu erhöhen. Sowohl lokale Agrarumweltmaßnahmen, wie Hecken, Blühstreifen und biologische Bewirtschaftung, als auch Landschaften mit einer hohen Diversität an Landnutzungstypen und geringer Nutzungsintensität können Ökosystemdienstleistungen wie biologische Schädlingsregulierung fördern. Der Einfluss von lokalen Maßnahmen, von einer nützlingsfreundlichen Landschaft und von Interaktionen zwischen lokalen und Landschaftsfaktoren auf Ökosystemdienstleistungen wurde bisher nicht länderübergreifend in intensiv bewirtschafteten, mehrjährigen Anbausystemen überprüft. Vor dem Hintergrund des Klimawandels und damit einhergehenden Veränderungen in der Verbreitung von Arten muss die Wirkung von Agrarumweltmaßnahmen (hier einschließlich biologischer Bewirtschaftung) auf Ökosystemdienstleistungen über klimatische Regionen hinweg untersucht werden. Die vorliegende Arbeit erforscht den Einfluss lokaler Maßnahmen und Landschaftsfaktoren auf räuberische Arthropoden (hier Insekten und Spinnen) und ihre Beute sowie auf Zielkonflikte zwischen der Förderung von Biodiversität, Ökosystemdienstleistungen und Fruchtproduktion im Obstbau in drei Ländern Europas. Maßnahmen, die auf lokaler Ebene erfasst wurden, waren zum einen die Qualität angrenzender Habitate (z. B. das Vorhandensein von Gehölzstrukturen und eine hohe Pflanzendiversität) und zum anderen die Bewirtschaftung: integrierte Produktion (IP; basierend unter anderem auf der verringerten und gezielten Anwendung von chemisch-synthetischen Pflanzenschutzmitteln) und biologische Bewirtschaftung. Als Landschaftsfaktoren wurden die Landnutzungsintensität und die Diversität der Landschaft im Umkreis eines Kilometers berücksichtigt. Der Anteil an Obstanlagen diente dabei als Annäherungsmaß für eine erhöhte Nutzungsintensität. Über einen Zeitraum von drei Jahren habe ich im Rahmen der vorliegenden Dissertation Arthropoden-Gemeinschaften in 30 Apfelanlagen in Deutschland untersucht. Ein besonderer Fokus lag auf natürlichen Gegenspielern von Schädlingen sowie auf Herbivoren und ihrer Wirkung auf die Gesundheit der Obstbäume und die Fruchtproduktion. Meine Analysen bezogen sich sowohl auf die in Deutschland erhobenen Daten als auch auf Daten, die von meinen BiodivERsA EcoFruit Projektpartnern in je 28 Apfelanlagen in Spanien und Schweden erhoben wurden. In einem Team von 17 Wissenschaftlern habe ich untersucht, wie Agrarumweltmaßnahmen, Anlagenbewirtschaftung und die umgebende Landschaft gestaltet werden können, um Ökosystemdienstleistungen und Biodiversität in Apfelanlagen zu fördern. Von dieser allgemeinen Betrachtung (Publikation I) ausgehend, habe ich mich damit beschäftigt, wie die Lebensräume für Gemeinschaften von räuberischen Arthropoden (Publikation II) sowie für einzelne Gruppen räuberischer Arthropoden in Apfelanlagen (Publikation III) verbessert werden können. Die erste Publikation (Kapitel 2) ermöglicht einen Einblick in die komplexen Interaktionen funktionaler Arthropodengruppen (Bestäuber, Prädatoren und Schädlinge) und ihre Wirkung auf die Fruchtproduktion unter variierenden Umweltbedingungen. Die Studie analysiert Zielkonflikte bei der Förderung von Ökosystemdienstleistungen – unter anderem im Hinblick auf Ertrag, natürliche Gegenspieler und ihre Beute. In Kooperation mit unseren Projektpartnern habe ich dabei die Auswirkungen von lokalen und Landschaftsfaktoren auf die funktionalen Gruppen und auf von ihnen erbrachte Ökosystemdienstleistungen sowie verursachte Schäden in 86 europäischen Apfelanlagen in Deutschland, Schweden und Spanien untersucht. Die Datenerfassung fand während einer Saison, zwischen März und Oktober 2015, unter Verwendung eines einheitlichen Versuchsdesigns statt. Schlüsselfunktionen von „Ökosystemdienstleistern“ sind hier biologische Schädlingsregulierung und Bestäubung, während Fruchtschäden zum Zeitpunkt der Ernte und Blattlausbefall als Schäden definiert wurden. Der Ertrag (erfasst als Fruchtproduktion und Samenansatz) diente in dieser Studie als Zielvariable für die Wirkung der Bereitstellung von Ökosystemdienstleistungen. Unter Verwendung von Strukturgleichungsmodellen wurden Zielkonflikte zwischen Ökosystemdienstleistungen, Biodiversitätsförderung und Fruchtproduktion untersucht. Die biologische Bewirtschaftung hatte über die drei Länder hinweg einen positiven Einfluss auf natürliche Gegenspieler. Die höhere Abundanz natürlicher Gegenspieler in Anlagen mit biologischer Bewirtschaftung kompensierte – zumindest teilweise – den erhöhten Fruchtschaden und den geringeren Ertrag in diesen Anlagen. Es konnte kein generell positiver Einfluss von Umweltmaßnahmen wie Hecken und blütenreichen Randstrukturen auf natürliche Gegenspieler festgestellt werden. Allerdings förderte eine hohe Blütendeckung im Unterwuchs und am Rand der Anlage indirekt den Fruchtertrag, indem sie sich positiv auf die Anzahl der Apfelblütenbesuche von Wildbienen auswirkte, von der wiederum die Bestäubungsleistung profitierte. Die Diversität von Nützlingen (räuberischen Arthropoden und Bestäubern) war in Landschaften mit hoher Nutzungsintensität geringer als in weniger intensiv genutzten Landschaften. Die zweite Publikation (Kapitel 3) beschäftigt sich mit Gemeinschaften von räuberischen Arthropoden in Apfelanlagen in allen drei Ländern und untersucht den Einfluss von lokalen und Landschaftsfaktoren auf diese Gemeinschaften. Zusammen mit den Projektpartnern in Deutschland, Spanien und Schweden habe ich folgende sieben räuberische Arthropodengruppen näher betrachtet: Spinnen (Araneae), Käfer (Coleoptera), Ohrwürmer (Dermaptera), Fliegen (Diptera), Wanzen (Heteroptera), Netzflügler (Neuroptera) und Weberknechte (Opiliones). 2015 nahmen wir in allen 86 Apfelanlagen Klopfproben, um die Abundanz der Arthropoden zu erfassen. Zusätzlich wurde anhand der Biomasse und Metabolismusrate (Energieumsatz eines Organismus pro Zeiteinheit) der Arthropoden der Energieumsatz der Arthropodengemeinschaft berechnet. Er diente als Annäherungsmaß für das Prädationspotential der Gemeinschaften. Biologische Bewirtschaftung erhöhte die Abundanz in fünf der sieben Gruppen: Es profitierten Spinnen, Käfer, Ohrwürmer, Fliegen und Wanzen von biologischer Bewirtschaftung. Dabei war die Reaktion der Prädatorengruppen nicht kongruent in allen drei Ländern: Gruppen, die in einem Land von biologischer Bewirtschaftung profitierten, blieben in den anderen zwei Ländern davon teils unberührt. Wir fanden in IP- und Bio- Anlagen gegensätzliche Wirkungen von lokalen und Landschaftsfaktoren auf die untersuchten Prädatorengruppen: Ein größerer Anteil von angrenzenden Gehölzstrukturen in der direkten Umgebung der Apfelanlage erhöhte die Abundanz von Ohrwürmern in Schweden, verringerte sie jedoch in Deutschland. Eine hohe Pflanzendiversität hatte, abhängig von Land und Bewirtschaftung, einen negativen Einfluss auf die Abundanz von Wanzen. Das Prädationspotential (Energieumsatz der Prädatorengemeinschaft) war in Spanien in Bioanlagen höher als in IP-Anlagen, blieb aber in den übrigen Ländern unbeeinflusst von lokalen und Landschaftsfaktoren. Die dritte Publikation (Kapitel 4) thematisiert den Einfluss von lokalen und Landschaftseinflüssen auf eine einzelne Arthropodengruppe (die Ohrwürmer) und einen für diese Gruppe wichtigen Beuteorganismus (die Apfelblutlaus). Ohrwürmer gelten als bedeutende generalistische Prädatoren in Apfelanlagen, Blutläuse als weit verbreitete Apfelschädlinge. Ich habe im Rahmen dieser Fallstudie untersucht, ob lokale Einflüsse wie das Vorhandensein von angrenzenden Gehölzstrukturen, eine biologische Bewirtschaftung der Anlage sowie Landschaften mit einer geringen Landnutzungsintensität die Lebensbedingung für Ohrwürmer in intensiven Anbausystemen verbessern. Dazu wurde in 30 Apfelanlagen in Deutschland (2015-2016) und 28 Apfelanlagen in Spanien (2015) die Ohrwurmabundanz mittels Nisthilfen erfasst. In beiden Ländern wurden sowohl IP-Anlagen als auch biologisch bewirtschaftete Anlagen beprobt. Gleichzeitig wurde der Befall der Bäume durch Blutläuse erfasst. Um mögliche Zusammenhänge zwischen Ohrwurmabundanz und der Verfügbarkeit potentieller Beuteorganismen aufzuzeigen, wurden Korrelationsanalysen verwendet. Die Ergebnisse zeigten nur eine schwache Korrelation der Ohrwurmabundanz mit dem Blutlausbefall. Die Ohrwurmart Forficula auricularia blieb von der Bewirtschaftung der Anlage unbeeinflusst. Die Ohrwurmabundanz war in deutschen IP-Anlagen mit angrenzenden Gehölzstrukturen geringer als in IP-Anlagen ohne solche Strukturen. In Spanien waren die zwei Ohrwurmarten Forficula auricularia und F. pubescens in den Anlagen anzutreffen. Hier profitierte nur die in Deutschland nicht vorkommende Art F. pubescens von einer biologischen Bewirtschaftung der Apfelanlagen. Die drei unterschiedlichen Perspektiven auf räuberische Arthropoden (Kapitel 2-4) zeigen, wie wichtig die Einflüsse von lokalen und Landschaftsfaktoren für Ökosystemdienstleistungen im Allgemeinen und räuberische Arthropoden im Besonderen sind. Dabei wird jedoch deutlich, dass Prädatoren je nach Land und Arthropodengruppe unterschiedlich auf solche Einflüsse reagieren. Agrarumweltmaßnahmen im Apfelanbau, dem wichtigsten mehrjährigen landwirtschaftlichen Produktionssystem in Europa, müssen über die Förderung von biologischer Bewirtschaftung hinaus an die Bedürfnisse einzelner Prädatorengruppen angepasst werden. Bei ihrer Auswahl müssen Zielkonflikte - beispielsweise zu der Förderung anderer Ökosystemdienstleistungen und der Ertragssicherung - abgewogen und vermieden werden. Vor dem Hintergrund möglicher, durch den Klimawandel induzierter Änderungen in der Artenverteilung innerhalb von Europa, sollten länderspezifische Gegebenheiten (wie Hauptschädlinge, ihr Voltinismus und ihre wichtigsten Gegenspieler) bei der Anpassung von Agrarumweltmaßnahmen und der Gestaltung der Agrarlandschaft berücksichtigt werden.German
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

View Item View Item