TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

From field to fat – Integrating approaches to unveil use of trophic resources by tropical and temperate ant species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

Baumgarten Rosumek, Félix :
From field to fat – Integrating approaches to unveil use of trophic resources by tropical and temperate ant species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).
[Online-Edition: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/8103]
Technische Universität , Darmstadt
[Dissertation], (2018)

Offizielle URL: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/8103

Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract)

The use of food resources is one of the most important aspects of ecosystem functioning. Trophic relationships determine fluxes of matter and energy, shape interactions between organisms and ultimately direct the evolution of the species themselves. Competition is a fundamental biotic interaction, and niche partitioning constitutes an important mechanism to allow species coexistence. However, many other factors influence community structuring, and may change or supplant the outcomes of competition. Ants are one of the most abundant, widespread and ecologically relevant terrestrial organisms. On the ground of tropical forests, dozens of species may coexist, which raises the question: how similar are they? Behavioral and environmental mechanisms of coexistence have been proposed for ants, but the use of resources itself is surprisingly understudied, and the trophic niches of most species is unknown. In this thesis, I used three complementary methods, representing a gradient of source-specificity/time-representativity, to describe patterns of resource use in a tropical and a temperate ant community. In the first study, I reviewed the available literature on resource use for the identified tropical species and compared it to field data obtained with baiting. Previous information was scant or inexistent for most species. Ants broadly used most resources available, but with quantitative differences between species. Wasmannia auropunctata has the most specialized niche, using only feces, a new behavior for the species. In the second study, my coauthors and I performed a laboratory experiment to describe fatty acid assimilation in ants. Two temperate ant species (Formica fusca and Myrmica rubra) displayed similar patterns and dynamics in composition, although amounts were influenced by their reproductive status. The main fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1n9) were extensively synthesized from sugars, but we observed some diet-specific ones that might work as biomarkers (C18:2n6, C18:3n3, C18:3n6). The experiment fulfilled a basic knowledge gap and set the ground for application of fatty acid analysis in an ecological context. In the third study, we put together field observations, fatty acid and stable isotope analyses to describe overall patterns of resource use and species’ niches in both communities. We observed a consistent picture of high, and quantitatively equivalent, generalism in both communities, regardless of species richness. Temperate species presented fatty acid patterns distinct from tropical ones, which may be related to environmental factors. Similarities in bait attendance, fatty acid compositions and isotope signatures were all correlated in Brazil, thus all methods corresponded in their characterization of species’ niches to some extent, and were robust enough to detect differences even in a highly generalized community. Method complementarity was particularly important to understand the behavior of the most specialized species. In Germany, no correlations were observed, likely due to the small number of species available. Fatty acid analysis emerges as a powerful tool and may be applied to answer many questions related to resource use in ants, but use of fatty acids as biomarkers seems to be limited. In general, the results of this thesis agreed with the recent view that specialization does not increase with species richness towards the tropics. Several coexistence mechanisms may act to structure ant communities, with trophic niche partitioning playing a relatively small role in the ones we studied. No mechanism appears to be universal and community structure may be better understood on a case-by-case basis, at local scale.

Typ des Eintrags: Dissertation
Erschienen: 2018
Autor(en): Baumgarten Rosumek, Félix
Titel: From field to fat – Integrating approaches to unveil use of trophic resources by tropical and temperate ant species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)
Sprache: Englisch
Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract):

The use of food resources is one of the most important aspects of ecosystem functioning. Trophic relationships determine fluxes of matter and energy, shape interactions between organisms and ultimately direct the evolution of the species themselves. Competition is a fundamental biotic interaction, and niche partitioning constitutes an important mechanism to allow species coexistence. However, many other factors influence community structuring, and may change or supplant the outcomes of competition. Ants are one of the most abundant, widespread and ecologically relevant terrestrial organisms. On the ground of tropical forests, dozens of species may coexist, which raises the question: how similar are they? Behavioral and environmental mechanisms of coexistence have been proposed for ants, but the use of resources itself is surprisingly understudied, and the trophic niches of most species is unknown. In this thesis, I used three complementary methods, representing a gradient of source-specificity/time-representativity, to describe patterns of resource use in a tropical and a temperate ant community. In the first study, I reviewed the available literature on resource use for the identified tropical species and compared it to field data obtained with baiting. Previous information was scant or inexistent for most species. Ants broadly used most resources available, but with quantitative differences between species. Wasmannia auropunctata has the most specialized niche, using only feces, a new behavior for the species. In the second study, my coauthors and I performed a laboratory experiment to describe fatty acid assimilation in ants. Two temperate ant species (Formica fusca and Myrmica rubra) displayed similar patterns and dynamics in composition, although amounts were influenced by their reproductive status. The main fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0 and C18:1n9) were extensively synthesized from sugars, but we observed some diet-specific ones that might work as biomarkers (C18:2n6, C18:3n3, C18:3n6). The experiment fulfilled a basic knowledge gap and set the ground for application of fatty acid analysis in an ecological context. In the third study, we put together field observations, fatty acid and stable isotope analyses to describe overall patterns of resource use and species’ niches in both communities. We observed a consistent picture of high, and quantitatively equivalent, generalism in both communities, regardless of species richness. Temperate species presented fatty acid patterns distinct from tropical ones, which may be related to environmental factors. Similarities in bait attendance, fatty acid compositions and isotope signatures were all correlated in Brazil, thus all methods corresponded in their characterization of species’ niches to some extent, and were robust enough to detect differences even in a highly generalized community. Method complementarity was particularly important to understand the behavior of the most specialized species. In Germany, no correlations were observed, likely due to the small number of species available. Fatty acid analysis emerges as a powerful tool and may be applied to answer many questions related to resource use in ants, but use of fatty acids as biomarkers seems to be limited. In general, the results of this thesis agreed with the recent view that specialization does not increase with species richness towards the tropics. Several coexistence mechanisms may act to structure ant communities, with trophic niche partitioning playing a relatively small role in the ones we studied. No mechanism appears to be universal and community structure may be better understood on a case-by-case basis, at local scale.

Ort: Darmstadt
Fachbereich(e)/-gebiet(e): 10 Fachbereich Biologie
10 Fachbereich Biologie > Ecological Networks
Hinterlegungsdatum: 21 Okt 2018 19:55
Offizielle URL: https://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/8103
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-81035
Referenten: Heethoff, PD Dr. Michael ; Blüthgen, Prof. Dr. Nico
Datum der mündlichen Prüfung / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 12 Oktober 2018
Alternatives Abstract:
Alternativer AbstractSprache
Die Nutzung von Nahrungsressourcen ist einer der wichtigsten Aspekte der Funktionalität von Ökosystemen. Trophische Beziehungen bestimmen Materie- und Energieflüsse, prägen Interaktionen zwischen Organismen und lenken letztlich die Evolution der Arten. Die Konkurrenz ist eine fundamentale biotische Interaktion und die Nischenaufteilung ist ein wichtiger Mechanismus der die Koexistenz von Arten ermöglicht. Allerdings beeinflussen viele andere Faktoren die Strukturierung von Biozönosen und können die Auswirkungen von Konkurrenz verändern oder sogar verdrängen. Ameisen gehören zu den häufigsten, am weitesten verbreiteten und ökologisch relevantesten Landorganismen. Auf dem Boden tropischer Wälder koexistieren viele Ameisenarten, was die Frage aufwirft: Wie ähnlich sind sie untereinander? Als Erklärung für die Koexistenz dieser Arten wurden Verhaltens- und Umweltmechanismen herangezogen, aber die Ressourcennutzung ist bis heute überraschend wenig erforscht, und die trophischen Einnischung der meisten Arten sind nicht bekannt. In meiner Dissertation verwendete ich drei komplementäre Methoden, entlang eines Gradienten von Quellenspezifität/Zeit-Repräsentativität, um die Muster der Ressourcennutzung in tropischer und temperater Ameisengemeinschaften zu beschreiben. In der ersten Studie analysierte ich die vorhandene Literatur zur Ressourcennutzung für die vorgefundenen tropischen Arten und verglich diese mit über Köderfallen erhobenen Felddaten. Die Literaturrecherche offenbarte einen spärlichen Kenntnisstand in Bezug auf die einzelnen Arten. Die Ameisenarten nutzten überwiegend den Großteil aller verfügbaren Ressourcen, jedoch mit quantitativen Unterschieden zwischen den Arten. Wasmannia auropunctata benutzte nur Faeces, was bisher gänzlich unbekannt war, und es besetzt die spezialisierteste Nische. In der zweiten Studie führten meine Koautoren und ich ein Laborexperiment durch, um die Fettsäureassimilation bei Ameisen aufzuklären. Zwei temperate Ameisenarten (Formica fusca und Myrmica rubra) zeigten ähnliche Muster und Dynamiken bei der Zusammensetzung ihrer Fettsäuren, obwohl die absoluten Mengen von dem jeweiligen reproduktiven Status beeinflusst wurden. Die Hauptfettsäuren (C16:0, C18:0 und C18:1n9) wurden überwiegend aus Zuckern synthetisiert, aber wir identifizierten einige diätspezifische Fettsäuren, die als Biomarker fungieren könnten (C18:2n6, C18:3n3, C18:3n6). Das Experiment füllte eine entscheidende Wissenslücke und lieferte die Grundlage für die Anwendung der Fettsäureanalyse in einem ökologischen Kontext. In der dritten Studie führten wir eine stabile Isotopenanalyse durch und brachten die Ergebnisse mit unseren Feldbeobachtungen und Fettsäureanalysen in Zusammenhang, um die Ressourcennutzung und die Einnischung der Arten in beiden Gemeinschaften aufzuklären. In beiden Gemeinschaften zeigte sich unabhängig von der Artenzahl ein hoher und quantitativ äquivalenter Grad an Generalismus. Temperate Arten zeigten Fettsäuremuster, die sich von denen der tropischen unterscheiden, was eine Konsequenz der divergierenden Umweltfaktoren sein könnte. Die Ähnlichkeiten in Bezug auf Ködernutzung, Fettsäurenzusammensetzung und Isotopensignatur waren bei der tropischen Gemeinschaft miteinander korreliert, so dass bei allen Methoden die Charakterisierung der jeweiligen Artnische übereinstimmte. Die Methoden waren auch robust genug um Unterschiede selbst in einer hoch generalisierten Gemeinschaft zu erkennen. Methodenkomplementarität war besonders wichtig, um das Verhalten der spezialisiertesten Arten zu verstehen. Bei der temperaten Gemeinschaft wurden jedoch keine derartigen Korrelationen festgestellt, was wahrscheinlich in der kleineren Anzahl an Arten begründet lag. Die Fettsäureanalyse stellt somit ein adäquates Werkzeug dar, um viele Fragen in Zusammenhang mit der Ressourcennutzung bei Ameisen aufzuklären. Die Verwendung von Fettsäuren als Biomarker hat allerdings Grenzen. Insgesamt stimmen die Ergebnisse dieser Arbeit mit der neueren Ansicht überein, dass der Grad der Spezialisierung in Biozönosen eben nicht mit einer höheren Artenvielfalt, wie in den Tropen, zunimmt. Verschiedene Koexistenzmechanismen können Ameisengemeinschaften strukturieren, wobei die trophische Nischenpartitionierung in den untersuchten Gemeinschaften nur eine untergeordnete Rolle spielt. Kein Mechanismus scheint universell zu sein, und die Struktur einer Gemeinschaft kann nur auf lokaler Ebene und einzelfallbezogen verstanden werden.Deutsch
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

Eintrag anzeigen Eintrag anzeigen