TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

WOMEN AND THE URBAN SANITATION CHALLENGE: Tracing an intersectional relationship

Suri, Anshika (2018):
WOMEN AND THE URBAN SANITATION CHALLENGE: Tracing an intersectional relationship.
Darmstadt, Technische Universität, [Online-Edition: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/7478],
[Ph.D. Thesis]

Abstract

The global sanitation crisis is one of the most important developmental challenges in the 21st century with 2.4 billion people still lacking access to improved sanitation facilities. Women are particularly affected and the lack of access to safe toilets is accompanied by several risks, shame, health issues, indignity, harassment and attack. Though sanitation is usually perceived as a private act, the lack of a private space forces the action to become a matter of public intervention, i.e. open defecation, leading to the female body not only becoming a site of oppression but also of contestation, negotiations and a socio-political tool within urban infrastructure regimes. Thus, sanitation infrastructure is often determined by engineering, environmental and public health concerns that are often far removed from women's needs, their socio-cultural practices and existing gender constructs. In addition, the failure to involve women in the design of infrastructure facilities results in inappropriate standards and technological artefacts. Furthermore, research about gender and sanitation in African cities focuses mostly on hygiene and health issues but fails to capture the magnitude and scope of gender-based disparities, how women's human rights fit into different development strategies and an inherent lack of gender equality in accessibility of sanitary infrastructure. Therefore, my research claims that there is a need to examine injustice against women through infrastructural inadequacy. In this research, I aim to investigate the inclusion of public infrastructure under the taxonomy of systems of oppression of women through the perspective of urban and infrastructural development issues. I use a techno-feminist perspective to inspect how gender inequality in urban spaces, manifested in the different relations women and men establish with sanitation facilities in informal settlements, could also be seen from the lenses of women ́s ambiguous relation with technology (as users but removed from design). The research presents data obtained through in-depth, semi-structured interviews, participant observations and focus group discussions conducted in March-April 2015 and February-April 2016 with state actors, development agencies, non-governmental organizations and, male and female residents of informal settlements in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and Nairobi, Kenya. The findings revealed firstly, sanitation infrastructure provision exhibited a technical focus, with a major emphasis on public health concerns in Dar es Salaam whereas the findings from Nairobi presented a more emphasised focus on engineering and technical aspects along with concerns for public health and hygiene. Secondly, fear and insecurity were being imbibed within the women residents of informal settlements who used various coping mechanisms in their everyday encounters with shared/multi-family toilets. Thirdly, the lived experiences of women users contrasted with the imaginaries designed by service providers. In both the cities, all actors involved in service provision showed an imagining of the users and usage of the infrastructure by the designers. The conclusion of the study highlighted that firstly, despite the presence of acts of violence against women intersecting with shared/multi-family toilets, the layer of violence is yet to be addressed within sanitation infrastructure provision. Additionally, themes of reductionism were observed within service provision processes that could be exacerbating the induction of fear and insecurity within the women residents. Furthermore, the women residents’ restricted interaction with the infrastructure highlighted key information that could help bridge some of the gaps in knowledge on socio-spatially relevant sanitation infrastructure. Moreover, evidence from the lived experiences of the women residents highlighted the recurring acts of violence which created a more oppressive environment for them to live in every day, specifically the intersection of violence with inadequate service provision was identified to instigate an oppressive environment around shared sanitation facilities. Therefore, a more detailed analysis into urban infrastructure planning needs to be carried out to determine with certainty if infrastructures are themselves turning into systems of oppression or whether the reported violence is an unintended consequence.

Item Type: Ph.D. Thesis
Erschienen: 2018
Creators: Suri, Anshika
Title: WOMEN AND THE URBAN SANITATION CHALLENGE: Tracing an intersectional relationship
Language: English
Abstract:

The global sanitation crisis is one of the most important developmental challenges in the 21st century with 2.4 billion people still lacking access to improved sanitation facilities. Women are particularly affected and the lack of access to safe toilets is accompanied by several risks, shame, health issues, indignity, harassment and attack. Though sanitation is usually perceived as a private act, the lack of a private space forces the action to become a matter of public intervention, i.e. open defecation, leading to the female body not only becoming a site of oppression but also of contestation, negotiations and a socio-political tool within urban infrastructure regimes. Thus, sanitation infrastructure is often determined by engineering, environmental and public health concerns that are often far removed from women's needs, their socio-cultural practices and existing gender constructs. In addition, the failure to involve women in the design of infrastructure facilities results in inappropriate standards and technological artefacts. Furthermore, research about gender and sanitation in African cities focuses mostly on hygiene and health issues but fails to capture the magnitude and scope of gender-based disparities, how women's human rights fit into different development strategies and an inherent lack of gender equality in accessibility of sanitary infrastructure. Therefore, my research claims that there is a need to examine injustice against women through infrastructural inadequacy. In this research, I aim to investigate the inclusion of public infrastructure under the taxonomy of systems of oppression of women through the perspective of urban and infrastructural development issues. I use a techno-feminist perspective to inspect how gender inequality in urban spaces, manifested in the different relations women and men establish with sanitation facilities in informal settlements, could also be seen from the lenses of women ́s ambiguous relation with technology (as users but removed from design). The research presents data obtained through in-depth, semi-structured interviews, participant observations and focus group discussions conducted in March-April 2015 and February-April 2016 with state actors, development agencies, non-governmental organizations and, male and female residents of informal settlements in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and Nairobi, Kenya. The findings revealed firstly, sanitation infrastructure provision exhibited a technical focus, with a major emphasis on public health concerns in Dar es Salaam whereas the findings from Nairobi presented a more emphasised focus on engineering and technical aspects along with concerns for public health and hygiene. Secondly, fear and insecurity were being imbibed within the women residents of informal settlements who used various coping mechanisms in their everyday encounters with shared/multi-family toilets. Thirdly, the lived experiences of women users contrasted with the imaginaries designed by service providers. In both the cities, all actors involved in service provision showed an imagining of the users and usage of the infrastructure by the designers. The conclusion of the study highlighted that firstly, despite the presence of acts of violence against women intersecting with shared/multi-family toilets, the layer of violence is yet to be addressed within sanitation infrastructure provision. Additionally, themes of reductionism were observed within service provision processes that could be exacerbating the induction of fear and insecurity within the women residents. Furthermore, the women residents’ restricted interaction with the infrastructure highlighted key information that could help bridge some of the gaps in knowledge on socio-spatially relevant sanitation infrastructure. Moreover, evidence from the lived experiences of the women residents highlighted the recurring acts of violence which created a more oppressive environment for them to live in every day, specifically the intersection of violence with inadequate service provision was identified to instigate an oppressive environment around shared sanitation facilities. Therefore, a more detailed analysis into urban infrastructure planning needs to be carried out to determine with certainty if infrastructures are themselves turning into systems of oppression or whether the reported violence is an unintended consequence.

Place of Publication: Darmstadt
Divisions: 15 Department of Architecture
15 Department of Architecture > Fachgruppe E: Stadtplanung
15 Department of Architecture > Fachgruppe E: Stadtplanung > Entwerfen und Stadtentwicklung
Date Deposited: 01 Jul 2018 19:55
Official URL: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/7478
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-74786
Referees: Rudolph-Cleff, Prof. Dr.Ing-. Annette and Ruiz Martinez, Dr. Carme and Knöll, Jun.Prof. Dr.Ing-. Martin
Refereed / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 25 April 2018
Alternative Abstract:
Alternative abstract Language
Die Sanitärversorgung stellt weltweit eine der größten entwicklungspolitischen Herausfor- derungen des 21. Jahrhunderts dar, denn etwa 2,4 Milliarden Menschen haben noch immer keinen Zugang zu angemessenen sanitären Einrichtungen. Frauen sind besonders betroffen, und der fehlende Zugang zu sicheren Toiletten ist für sie gleich mit mehreren Risiken, mit Scham, Gesundheitsproblemen, Erniedrigung, sexueller Belästigung und Übergriffen verbun- den. Obwohl die sanitäre Grundversorgung als private Angelegenheit verstanden wird, macht das Fehlen eines privaten Raumes diese zur öffentlichen Aktion, d.h. der offenen Defäkation mit der Folge, dass der weibliche Körper nicht nur Gegenstand der Unterdrückung, sondern auch Gegenstand der Anfechtung, der Aushandlung und gesellschaftspolitisches Mittel inner- halb der städtischen Infrastrukturregime wird. So wird die Infrastruktur in der Sanitärver- sorgung oft von technischen, ökologischen und gesundheitlichen Belangen bestimmt, die weit entfernt sind von den Bedürfnissen der Frauen selbst, ihren soziokulturellen Praktiken und den bestehenden Geschlechterbeziehungen. Darüber hinaus führt die fehlende Einbezie- hung von Frauen in die Planung und Gestaltung von Infrastruktureinrichtungen zu unange- messenen Standards und technologischen Artefakten. Die Forschung zu Gender und Hygiene in afrikanischen Städten konzentriert sich hauptsäch- lich auf die Themenfelder Hygiene und Gesundheit, sie erfasst dabei aber nicht das Ausmaß und den Umfang der geschlechtsspezifischen Disparitäten, wie sich die Menschenrechte von Frauen in verschiedene Entwicklungsstrategien einfügen, noch den inhärenten Mangel an Gleichberechtigung in der sanitären Versorgung. Deshalb geht meine Forschungsarbeit von der Feststellung aus, dass es notwendig ist, Ungerechtigkeiten gegen Frauen durch infra- strukturelle Missstände zu untersuchen. In dieser Studie möchte ich die Einbeziehung der öffentlichen Infrastruktur in die Taxonomie der Systeme der Unterdrückung von Frauen aus der Perspektive der Stadt- und Infrastrukturentwicklung untersuchen. Ich habe eine techno- feministische Perspektive ausgewählt, um zu untersuchen, wie sich die Ungleichheit der Ge- schlechter in städtischen Räumen, die sich in den unterschiedlichen Beziehungen von Frauen und Männern zu sanitären Einrichtungen in informellen Siedlungen manifestiert, aus Sicht der Frauen darstellt, die einen mehrdeutigen Bezug zur Technologie haben (als Nutzer, aber vom Design entfernt). Die Studie präsentiert Daten, die durch ausführliche, semi-strukturierte Interviews, teilneh- mende Beobachtungen und Diskussionen in Fokusgruppen im März-April 2015 und Februar- 14 April 2016 mit staatlichen Akteuren, Entwicklungsorganisationen, Nichtregierungsorganisa- tionen sowie männlichen und weiblichen Bewohnern informeller Siedlungen in Dar es Sa- laam, Tansania und Nairobi, Kenia, gewonnen wurden. Die Ergebnisse zeigten zum einen, dass die Versorgung mit sanitärer Infrastruktur einen technischen Schwerpunkt hat, wobei der Fokus in Dar es Salaam auf den Belangen der öffentlichen Gesundheit lag, während die Ergebnisse aus Nairobi einen stärkeren Nachdruck auf technischen Aspekten und auf Fragen der öffentlichen Gesundheit und Hygiene belegten. Zum zweiten wurde die Angst und Unsi- cherheit der Bewohnerinnen von informeller Siedlungen deutlich, die in ihrem Alltag unter- schiedliche Bewältigungsmechanismen für die Nutzung der gemeinsamen bzw. der von meh- reren Familien genutzten Toiletten entwickelt haben. Als drittes Ergebnis zeigte sich, dass die die gelebten Erfahrungen der Nutzerinnen in Kontrast zu den Vorstellungen und Planun- gen von den Betreibern stehen. In beiden Städten war für alle an der Versorgung beteiligten Akteure allein die Vorstellung der Planer von den Nutzern und der Nutzung der Infrastruktur ausschlaggebend. In der Schlussfolgerung der Arbeit wird dargelegt, dass trotz der gewalttätigen Übergriffe auf Frauen, die sich Toiletten mit mehreren Familien teilen, diese Ebene der Gewalt innerhalb der sanitären Infrastrukturversorgung noch nicht angegangen werden kann. Darüber hinaus wurden Themen des Reduktionismus innerhalb von Dienstleistungsprozessen beobachtet, die die Angst und Unsicherheit bei den Bewohnerinnen noch verschärfen könnten. Die ein- geschränkte Interaktion der Bewohnerinnen mit der Infrastruktur zeigte zudem wichtige In- formationen auf, die dazu beitragen könnten, einen Teil der Wissenslücke über die sozial- räumlich relevante Sanitärinfrastruktur zu schließen. Darüber hinaus wurden Themen des Reduktionismus in der Bereitstellung der Leistungen beobachtet, die die Angst und Unsicher- heit bei den Bewohnerinnen noch verstärken könnten. Zusätzlich hat die eingeschränkte In- teraktion der Bewohnerinnen mit der Infrastruktur wichtige Informationen aufgezeigt, die helfen könnten, einige Wissenslücken über die sozialräumlich relevante Sanitärinfrastruktur zu schließen. Des Weiteren belegten die Erfahrungen der Bewohnerinnen die immer wieder- kehrenden Gewalttaten, die ein bedrückenderes Umfeld für ihr tägliches Leben bildeten. Ins- besondere die Schnittmenge von Gewalt und mangelhafter Versorgung wurde als Ursache identifiziert für ein repressives Umfeld um gemeinschaftliche sanitäre Einrichtungen. Daher sollte eine detaillierte Analyse der Planung städtischer Infrastrukturen erfolgen, um mit Si- cherheit festzustellen, ob die Infrastruktureinrichtung selbst zu einem System der Unterdrü- ckung wird oder ob die auftretende Gewalt eine unbeabsichtigte Folge ist.German
Export:
Suche nach Titel in: TUfind oder in Google
Send an inquiry Send an inquiry

Options (only for editors)

View Item View Item