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Anticholinesterase treatment of chicken retinal cells increases acetylcholinesterase protein independently of protein kinase C

Keller, Markus and Robitzki, Andrea and Layer, Paul G. (2001):
Anticholinesterase treatment of chicken retinal cells increases acetylcholinesterase protein independently of protein kinase C.
In: Neuroscience letters, 309 (1), pp. 21-24. [Article]

Abstract

It has been reported that anticholinesterase exposure, e.g. by environmental toxins or nerve gases, can increase acetylcholinesterase (AChE) protein, possibly as an autoregulatory stress response. We earlier have transfected retinal cells of the chick embryo with a pSVK3-AChErab-cDNA vector to heterologously express rabbit AChE, which concomitantly also increased AChE protein from chick. To analyse further the cell-internal pathways of these different paradigms (anticholinesterase treatment vs. AChE transfection) which both lead to an AChE increase, we here show that AChE overexpression by transfection leads to an increase in protein kinase C (PKC). Most remarkably, when cells independently of, or in addition to their transfection are treated with 10 μM of the AChE inhibitor BW284c51, AChE protein levels are much more dramatically increased up to 20-fold. This treatment, however, does not affect PKC. These data show that (i) retinal cells respond to anticholinesterase insult by a massive increase of AChE protein; (ii) the response to BW284c51 is not PKC-mediated; and (iii) both strategies of AChE increase follow different cell-internal pathways, their effects being additive. The ecological and biomedical implications of these findings are briefly discussed.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2001
Creators: Keller, Markus and Robitzki, Andrea and Layer, Paul G.
Title: Anticholinesterase treatment of chicken retinal cells increases acetylcholinesterase protein independently of protein kinase C
Language: English
Abstract:

It has been reported that anticholinesterase exposure, e.g. by environmental toxins or nerve gases, can increase acetylcholinesterase (AChE) protein, possibly as an autoregulatory stress response. We earlier have transfected retinal cells of the chick embryo with a pSVK3-AChErab-cDNA vector to heterologously express rabbit AChE, which concomitantly also increased AChE protein from chick. To analyse further the cell-internal pathways of these different paradigms (anticholinesterase treatment vs. AChE transfection) which both lead to an AChE increase, we here show that AChE overexpression by transfection leads to an increase in protein kinase C (PKC). Most remarkably, when cells independently of, or in addition to their transfection are treated with 10 μM of the AChE inhibitor BW284c51, AChE protein levels are much more dramatically increased up to 20-fold. This treatment, however, does not affect PKC. These data show that (i) retinal cells respond to anticholinesterase insult by a massive increase of AChE protein; (ii) the response to BW284c51 is not PKC-mediated; and (iii) both strategies of AChE increase follow different cell-internal pathways, their effects being additive. The ecological and biomedical implications of these findings are briefly discussed.

Journal or Publication Title: Neuroscience letters
Journal volume: 309
Number: 1
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology
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10 Department of Biology > Developmental Biology and Neurogenetics
Date Deposited: 21 Nov 2011 12:40
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