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Edible plant vaccines: applications for prophylactic and therapeutic molecular medicine.

Mason, H. S. and Warzecha, Heribert and Mor, T. and Arntzen, C. J. (2002):
Edible plant vaccines: applications for prophylactic and therapeutic molecular medicine.
In: Trends in molecular medicine, 8 (7), pp. 324-9. ISSN 1471-4914,
[Article]

Abstract

The use of edible plants for the production and delivery of vaccine proteins could provide an economical alternative to fermentation systems. Genes encoding bacterial and viral antigens are faithfully expressed in edible tissues to form immunogenic proteins. Studies in animals and humans have shown that ingestion of transgenic plants containing vaccine proteins causes production of antigen-specific antibodies in serum and mucosal secretions. In general, the technology is limited by low expression levels for nuclear-integrated transgenes, but recent progress in plant organelle transformation shows promise for enhanced expression. The stability and immunogenicity of orally delivered antigens vary greatly, which necessitates further study on protein engineering to enhance mucosal delivery. These issues are discussed with regard to the further development of plant-based vaccine technology.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2002
Creators: Mason, H. S. and Warzecha, Heribert and Mor, T. and Arntzen, C. J.
Title: Edible plant vaccines: applications for prophylactic and therapeutic molecular medicine.
Language: English
Abstract:

The use of edible plants for the production and delivery of vaccine proteins could provide an economical alternative to fermentation systems. Genes encoding bacterial and viral antigens are faithfully expressed in edible tissues to form immunogenic proteins. Studies in animals and humans have shown that ingestion of transgenic plants containing vaccine proteins causes production of antigen-specific antibodies in serum and mucosal secretions. In general, the technology is limited by low expression levels for nuclear-integrated transgenes, but recent progress in plant organelle transformation shows promise for enhanced expression. The stability and immunogenicity of orally delivered antigens vary greatly, which necessitates further study on protein engineering to enhance mucosal delivery. These issues are discussed with regard to the further development of plant-based vaccine technology.

Journal or Publication Title: Trends in molecular medicine
Journal volume: 8
Number: 7
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology > Plant Biotechnology and Metabolic Engineering
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10 Department of Biology
Date Deposited: 17 Mar 2011 11:07
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