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Tumor Hypoxia and Circulating Tumor Cells

Tinganelli, Walter ; Durante, Marco (2020)
Tumor Hypoxia and Circulating Tumor Cells.
In: International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 21 (24)
doi: 10.3390/ijms21249592
Article, Bibliographie

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Abstract

Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a rare tumor cell subpopulation induced and selected by the tumor microenvironment’s extreme conditions. Under hypoxia and starvation, these aggressive and invasive cells are able to invade the lymphatic and circulatory systems. Escaping from the primary tumor, CTCs enter into the bloodstream to form metastatic deposits or re-establish themselves in cancer’s primary site. Although radiotherapy is widely used to cure solid malignancies, it can promote metastasis. Radiation can disrupt the primary tumor vasculature, increasing the dissemination of CTCs. Radiation also induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and eliminates suppressive signaling, causing the proliferation of existent, but previously dormant, disseminated tumor cells (DTCs). In this review, we collect the results and evidence underlying the molecular mechanisms of CTCs and DTCs and the effects of radiation and hypoxia in developing these cells.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2020
Creators: Tinganelli, Walter ; Durante, Marco
Type of entry: Bibliographie
Title: Tumor Hypoxia and Circulating Tumor Cells
Language: English
Date: 2020
Place of Publication: Basel
Publisher: MDPI
Journal or Publication Title: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Volume of the journal: 21
Issue Number: 24
Collation: 15 Seiten
DOI: 10.3390/ijms21249592
Corresponding Links:
Abstract:

Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a rare tumor cell subpopulation induced and selected by the tumor microenvironment’s extreme conditions. Under hypoxia and starvation, these aggressive and invasive cells are able to invade the lymphatic and circulatory systems. Escaping from the primary tumor, CTCs enter into the bloodstream to form metastatic deposits or re-establish themselves in cancer’s primary site. Although radiotherapy is widely used to cure solid malignancies, it can promote metastasis. Radiation can disrupt the primary tumor vasculature, increasing the dissemination of CTCs. Radiation also induces epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and eliminates suppressive signaling, causing the proliferation of existent, but previously dormant, disseminated tumor cells (DTCs). In this review, we collect the results and evidence underlying the molecular mechanisms of CTCs and DTCs and the effects of radiation and hypoxia in developing these cells.

Uncontrolled Keywords: CTCs, DTCs, EMT, metastasis, invasion, migration
Additional Information:

Erstveröffentlichung; This article belongs to the Special Issue Genes, Environment and Cancer

Classification DDC: 500 Science and mathematics > 530 Physics
500 Science and mathematics > 570 Life sciences, biology
Divisions: 05 Department of Physics
05 Department of Physics > Institute for Condensed Matter Physics
Date Deposited: 15 May 2024 14:44
Last Modified: 15 May 2024 14:44
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