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How land-use intensity affects sexual and parthenogenetic oribatid mites in temperate forests and grasslands in Germany.

Wehner, Katja and Schuster, Romina and Simons, Nadja K. and Norton, Roy A. and Blüthgen, Nico and Heethoff, Michael (2021):
How land-use intensity affects sexual and parthenogenetic oribatid mites in temperate forests and grasslands in Germany.
In: Experimental & applied acarology, 83 (3), pp. 343-373. ISSN 1572-9702,
DOI: 10.1007/s10493-020-00586-z,
[Article]

Abstract

Intensive land use has been shown to alter the composition and functioning of soil communities. Due to their low dispersal ability, oribatid mites are particularly vulnerable to land-use intensification and species which are not adjusted to management-related disturbances become less abundant. We investigated how different land-use parameters in forests and grasslands affect oribatid mite diversity and abundance, with a focus on: (1) species-level impacts, by classifying species as increasing ('winners') or decreasing ('losers') in abundance with higher land-use intensity, and (2) reproductive impact, by investigating whether sexual and parthenogenetic species react differently. We collected 32,542 adult oribatid mites in 60 forests and grasslands of known land-use intensity in two regions of Germany. Diversity and total abundance as well as the proportion of sexual species were higher in forests than in grasslands. Diversity declined with higher land-use intensity in forests, but increased with higher mowing and fertilization in grasslands. Depending on land-use parameter and region, abundance either declined or remained unaffected by increasing intensity. Gravidity was higher in sexual than in parthenogenetic species and sexuals had 1.6× more eggs per gravid female. Proportions of sexual species and gravid females decreased with land-use intensity in forests, but increased with mowing in grasslands. At the species level, 75% of sexuals and 87.5% of parthenogens were 'losers' of higher percentages of dead wood originating from management-related disturbances. Across land-use parameters and habitats, a similar proportion of sexual and parthenogenetic oribatid mite species were 'losers' of high land-use intensity. However, 'winner' species were more common among sexuals.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2021
Creators: Wehner, Katja and Schuster, Romina and Simons, Nadja K. and Norton, Roy A. and Blüthgen, Nico and Heethoff, Michael
Title: How land-use intensity affects sexual and parthenogenetic oribatid mites in temperate forests and grasslands in Germany.
Language: English
Abstract:

Intensive land use has been shown to alter the composition and functioning of soil communities. Due to their low dispersal ability, oribatid mites are particularly vulnerable to land-use intensification and species which are not adjusted to management-related disturbances become less abundant. We investigated how different land-use parameters in forests and grasslands affect oribatid mite diversity and abundance, with a focus on: (1) species-level impacts, by classifying species as increasing ('winners') or decreasing ('losers') in abundance with higher land-use intensity, and (2) reproductive impact, by investigating whether sexual and parthenogenetic species react differently. We collected 32,542 adult oribatid mites in 60 forests and grasslands of known land-use intensity in two regions of Germany. Diversity and total abundance as well as the proportion of sexual species were higher in forests than in grasslands. Diversity declined with higher land-use intensity in forests, but increased with higher mowing and fertilization in grasslands. Depending on land-use parameter and region, abundance either declined or remained unaffected by increasing intensity. Gravidity was higher in sexual than in parthenogenetic species and sexuals had 1.6× more eggs per gravid female. Proportions of sexual species and gravid females decreased with land-use intensity in forests, but increased with mowing in grasslands. At the species level, 75% of sexuals and 87.5% of parthenogens were 'losers' of higher percentages of dead wood originating from management-related disturbances. Across land-use parameters and habitats, a similar proportion of sexual and parthenogenetic oribatid mite species were 'losers' of high land-use intensity. However, 'winner' species were more common among sexuals.

Journal or Publication Title: Experimental & applied acarology
Journal volume: 83
Number: 3
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology
10 Department of Biology > Ecological Networks
Date Deposited: 15 Feb 2021 12:26
DOI: 10.1007/s10493-020-00586-z
Identification Number: pmid:33559807
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