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Activated Carbon in the Third Dimension—3D Printing of a Tuned Porous Carbon

Steldinger, Hendryk and Esposito, Alessandro and Brunnengräber, Kai and Gläsel, Jan and Etzold, Bastian J. M. (2019):
Activated Carbon in the Third Dimension—3D Printing of a Tuned Porous Carbon.
In: Advanced Science, 6 (19), Wiley VCH, ISSN 2198-3844,
DOI: 10.25534/tuprints-00011603,
[Article]

Abstract

A method for obtaining hierarchically structured porous carbons, employing 3D printing to control the structure down to the lower μm scale, is presented. To successfully 3D print a polymer precursor and transfer it to a highly stable and structurally conformal carbon material, stereolithography 3D printing and photoinduced copolymerization of pentaerythritol tetraacrylate and divinylbenzene are employed. Mechanically stable structures result and a resolution of ≈15 μm is demonstrated. This approach can be combined with liquid porogen templating to control the amount and size (up to ≈100 nm) of transport pores in the final carbonaceous material. Additional CO2 activation enables high surface area materials (up to 2200 m2 g-1) that show the 3D printing controlled μm structure and nm sized transport pores. This unique flexibility holds promise for the identification of optimal carbonaceous structures for energy application, catalysis, and adsorption.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2019
Creators: Steldinger, Hendryk and Esposito, Alessandro and Brunnengräber, Kai and Gläsel, Jan and Etzold, Bastian J. M.
Origin: Secondary publication via DEAL-contract with Wiley
Title: Activated Carbon in the Third Dimension—3D Printing of a Tuned Porous Carbon
Language: English
Abstract:

A method for obtaining hierarchically structured porous carbons, employing 3D printing to control the structure down to the lower μm scale, is presented. To successfully 3D print a polymer precursor and transfer it to a highly stable and structurally conformal carbon material, stereolithography 3D printing and photoinduced copolymerization of pentaerythritol tetraacrylate and divinylbenzene are employed. Mechanically stable structures result and a resolution of ≈15 μm is demonstrated. This approach can be combined with liquid porogen templating to control the amount and size (up to ≈100 nm) of transport pores in the final carbonaceous material. Additional CO2 activation enables high surface area materials (up to 2200 m2 g-1) that show the 3D printing controlled μm structure and nm sized transport pores. This unique flexibility holds promise for the identification of optimal carbonaceous structures for energy application, catalysis, and adsorption.

Journal or Publication Title: Advanced Science
Journal volume: 6
Number: 19
Publisher: Wiley VCH
Divisions: 07 Department of Chemistry
07 Department of Chemistry > Fachgebiet Technische Chemie
07 Department of Chemistry > Fachgebiet Technische Chemie > Technische Chemie I
Date Deposited: 05 Apr 2020 19:56
DOI: 10.25534/tuprints-00011603
Official URL: https://doi.org/10.1002/advs.201901340
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-116030
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