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Combining direct and indirect methods in optimal control: range maximization of a hang glider

Bulirsch, R. and Nerz, E. and Pesch, H. J. and Stryk, Oskar von and Stryk, Oskar von (1993):
Combining direct and indirect methods in optimal control: range maximization of a hang glider.
In: Optimal Control - Calculus of Variations, Optimal Control Theory and Numerical Methods, International Series of Numerical Mathematics, Basel: Birkhäuser, 111, [Conference or Workshop Item]

Abstract

When solving optimal control problems, indirect methods such as multiple shooting suffer from difficulties in finding an appropriate initial guess for the adjoint variables. For, this initial estimate must be provided for the iterative solution of the multipoint boundary-value problems arising from the necessary conditions of optimal control theory. Direct methods such as direct collocation do not suffer from this problem, but they generally yield results of lower accuracy and their iteration may even terminate with a non-optimal solution. Therefore, both methods are combined in such a way that the direct collocation method is at first applied to a simplified optimal control problem where all inequality constraints are neglected as long as the resulting problem is still well-defined; Because of the larger domain of convergence of the direct method, an approximation of the optimal solution of this problem can be obtained easier. The fusion between direct and indirect methods is then based on a relationship between the Lagrange multipliers of the underlying nonlinear programming problem to be solved by the direct method and the adjoint variables appearing in the necessary conditions which form the boundary-value problem to be solved by the indirect method. Hence, the adjoint variables, too, can be estimated from the approximation obtained by the direct method. This first step then facilitates the subsequent extension and completition of the model by homotopy techniques and the solution of the arising boundary-value problems by the indirect multiple shooting method. Proceeding in this way, the high accuracy and reliability of the multiple shooting method, especially the precise computation of the switching structure and the possibility to verify many necessary conditions, is preserved while disadvantages caused by the sensitive dependence on an appropriate estimate of the solution are considerably cut down. This procedure is described in detail for the numerical solution of the maximum-range trajectory optimization problem of a hang glider in an upwind which provi des an example for a control problem where appropriate initial estimates for the adjoint variables are hard to find.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item
Erschienen: 1993
Creators: Bulirsch, R. and Nerz, E. and Pesch, H. J. and Stryk, Oskar von and Stryk, Oskar von
Title: Combining direct and indirect methods in optimal control: range maximization of a hang glider
Language: German
Abstract:

When solving optimal control problems, indirect methods such as multiple shooting suffer from difficulties in finding an appropriate initial guess for the adjoint variables. For, this initial estimate must be provided for the iterative solution of the multipoint boundary-value problems arising from the necessary conditions of optimal control theory. Direct methods such as direct collocation do not suffer from this problem, but they generally yield results of lower accuracy and their iteration may even terminate with a non-optimal solution. Therefore, both methods are combined in such a way that the direct collocation method is at first applied to a simplified optimal control problem where all inequality constraints are neglected as long as the resulting problem is still well-defined; Because of the larger domain of convergence of the direct method, an approximation of the optimal solution of this problem can be obtained easier. The fusion between direct and indirect methods is then based on a relationship between the Lagrange multipliers of the underlying nonlinear programming problem to be solved by the direct method and the adjoint variables appearing in the necessary conditions which form the boundary-value problem to be solved by the indirect method. Hence, the adjoint variables, too, can be estimated from the approximation obtained by the direct method. This first step then facilitates the subsequent extension and completition of the model by homotopy techniques and the solution of the arising boundary-value problems by the indirect multiple shooting method. Proceeding in this way, the high accuracy and reliability of the multiple shooting method, especially the precise computation of the switching structure and the possibility to verify many necessary conditions, is preserved while disadvantages caused by the sensitive dependence on an appropriate estimate of the solution are considerably cut down. This procedure is described in detail for the numerical solution of the maximum-range trajectory optimization problem of a hang glider in an upwind which provi des an example for a control problem where appropriate initial estimates for the adjoint variables are hard to find.

Title of Book: Optimal Control - Calculus of Variations, Optimal Control Theory and Numerical Methods, International Series of Numerical Mathematics
Volume: 111
Publisher: Basel: Birkhäuser
Divisions: 20 Department of Computer Science
20 Department of Computer Science > Simulation, Systems Optimization and Robotics Group
Date Deposited: 20 Jun 2016 23:26
Identification Number: BulirschNerzPeschvonStryk:1991
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