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Determining the flow regime in a biofilm carrier by means of magnetic resonance imaging

Herrling, Maria Pia and Guthausen, Gisela and Wagner, Michael and Lackner, Susanne and Horn, Harald (2014):
Determining the flow regime in a biofilm carrier by means of magnetic resonance imaging.
In: Biotechnology and Bioengineering, pp. n/a-n/a, ISSN 1097-0290,
DOI: 10.1002/bit.25510,
[Online-Edition: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bit.25510],
[Article]

Abstract

Biofilms on cylindrical carrier material originating from a lab-scale moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) were investigated by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to determine the local flow velocities at the inner face of the biofilm carrier. To get an insight into the mass transport processes, flow velocity maps of blank and with biofilm cultivated carriers were measured. A single carrier was placed in a tube in three different orientations and exposed to flow velocities of 0.21, 0.42 and 0.64 mm/s. The interplay of the biofilm morphology and the local flow pattern was then analyzed including the effect of the orientation of the carrier in relation to the upstream flow angle. Within this study, the biofilm carrier can be understood as an interconnected system of four sections in which the incoming fluid volume will be distributed depending on the biomass occupation and morphology. In sections with high biofilm occupation, the flow resistance is increased. Depending on the orientation of the carrier in the flow field, this effect leads to flow evasion through less covered sections showing higher flow velocities and consequently the risk of biofilm detachment. However, there was no clear correlation between biofilm coverage and flow ratio. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2014
Creators: Herrling, Maria Pia and Guthausen, Gisela and Wagner, Michael and Lackner, Susanne and Horn, Harald
Title: Determining the flow regime in a biofilm carrier by means of magnetic resonance imaging
Language: English
Abstract:

Biofilms on cylindrical carrier material originating from a lab-scale moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) were investigated by means of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to determine the local flow velocities at the inner face of the biofilm carrier. To get an insight into the mass transport processes, flow velocity maps of blank and with biofilm cultivated carriers were measured. A single carrier was placed in a tube in three different orientations and exposed to flow velocities of 0.21, 0.42 and 0.64 mm/s. The interplay of the biofilm morphology and the local flow pattern was then analyzed including the effect of the orientation of the carrier in relation to the upstream flow angle. Within this study, the biofilm carrier can be understood as an interconnected system of four sections in which the incoming fluid volume will be distributed depending on the biomass occupation and morphology. In sections with high biofilm occupation, the flow resistance is increased. Depending on the orientation of the carrier in the flow field, this effect leads to flow evasion through less covered sections showing higher flow velocities and consequently the risk of biofilm detachment. However, there was no clear correlation between biofilm coverage and flow ratio. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

Journal or Publication Title: Biotechnology and Bioengineering
Uncontrolled Keywords: Biofilm Morphology Flow Velocity Magnetic Resonance Imaging Moving Bed Biofilm Reactor Flow Regime
Divisions: 13 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Sciences
13 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Sciences > Institute IWAR
13 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Sciences > Institute IWAR > Wastewater Engineering
Date Deposited: 11 Apr 2018 07:25
DOI: 10.1002/bit.25510
Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bit.25510
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