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Carbon isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of trichloroethene by Burkholderia cepacia G4: A tool to map degradation mechanisms

Barth, Johannes A.C. and Slater, Greg and Schüth, Christoph and Bill, Markus and Downey, Angela and Larkin, Mike and Kalin, Robert M. (2002):
Carbon isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of trichloroethene by Burkholderia cepacia G4: A tool to map degradation mechanisms.
In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, American Society for Microbiology, pp. 1728-1734, 68, (4), ISSN 00992240, DOI: 10.1128/AEM.68.4.1728-1734.2002, [Online-Edition: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11916690 http://www.pubme...],
[Article]

Abstract

The strain Burkholderia cepacia G4 aerobically mineralized trichloroethene (TCE) to CO(2) over a time period of approximately 20 h. Three biodegradation experiments were conducted with different bacterial optical densities at 540 nm (OD(540)s) in order to test whether isotope fractionation was consistent. The resulting TCE degradation was 93, 83.8, and 57.2% (i.e., 7.0, 16.2, and 42.8% TCE remaining) at OD(540)s of 2.0, 1.1, and 0.6, respectively. ODs also correlated linearly with zero-order degradation rates (1.99, 1.11, and 0.64 micromol h(-1)). While initial nonequilibrium mass losses of TCE produced only minor carbon isotope shifts (expressed in per mille delta(13)C(VPDB)), they were 57.2, 39.6, and 17.0 per thousand between the initial and final TCE levels for the three experiments, in decreasing order of their OD(540)s. Despite these strong isotope shifts, we found a largely uniform isotope fractionation. The latter is expressed with a Rayleigh enrichment factor, epsilon, and was -18.2 when all experiments were grouped to a common point of 42.8% TCE remaining. Although, decreases of epsilon to -20.7 were observed near complete degradation, our enrichment factors were significantly more negative than those reported for anaerobic dehalogenation of TCE. This indicates typical isotope fractionation for specific enzymatic mechanisms that can help to differentiate between degradation pathways.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2002
Creators: Barth, Johannes A.C. and Slater, Greg and Schüth, Christoph and Bill, Markus and Downey, Angela and Larkin, Mike and Kalin, Robert M.
Title: Carbon isotope fractionation during aerobic biodegradation of trichloroethene by Burkholderia cepacia G4: A tool to map degradation mechanisms
Language: English
Abstract:

The strain Burkholderia cepacia G4 aerobically mineralized trichloroethene (TCE) to CO(2) over a time period of approximately 20 h. Three biodegradation experiments were conducted with different bacterial optical densities at 540 nm (OD(540)s) in order to test whether isotope fractionation was consistent. The resulting TCE degradation was 93, 83.8, and 57.2% (i.e., 7.0, 16.2, and 42.8% TCE remaining) at OD(540)s of 2.0, 1.1, and 0.6, respectively. ODs also correlated linearly with zero-order degradation rates (1.99, 1.11, and 0.64 micromol h(-1)). While initial nonequilibrium mass losses of TCE produced only minor carbon isotope shifts (expressed in per mille delta(13)C(VPDB)), they were 57.2, 39.6, and 17.0 per thousand between the initial and final TCE levels for the three experiments, in decreasing order of their OD(540)s. Despite these strong isotope shifts, we found a largely uniform isotope fractionation. The latter is expressed with a Rayleigh enrichment factor, epsilon, and was -18.2 when all experiments were grouped to a common point of 42.8% TCE remaining. Although, decreases of epsilon to -20.7 were observed near complete degradation, our enrichment factors were significantly more negative than those reported for anaerobic dehalogenation of TCE. This indicates typical isotope fractionation for specific enzymatic mechanisms that can help to differentiate between degradation pathways.

Journal or Publication Title: Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume: 68
Number: 4
Publisher: American Society for Microbiology
ISBN: 0099-2240 (Print)\backslashn0099-2240 (Linking)
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Earth Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Earth Science > Hydrogeology
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
Date Deposited: 17 Apr 2018 12:14
DOI: 10.1128/AEM.68.4.1728-1734.2002
Official URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11916690 http://www.pubme...
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