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Advanced Research and Development Topics in Animation and Scientific Visualization

Krömker, Detlef and Englert, Gabriele and Haas, Stefan and Klement, Edwin and Loseries, Fritz and Müller, Wolfgang (GRIS) and Sakas, Georgios and Vohsbeck-Petermann, Ralf and de Martino, Josè Mario and Encarnação, José L. (1993):
Advanced Research and Development Topics in Animation and Scientific Visualization.
Academic Press, London, [Book Section]

Abstract

The term animation has a Greek (animos) as well as a Roman (anima) root. To animate is, literally, to bring to life. The main aspect of life is the change over time. Modern definitions based on the role in computer graphics are as follows: "Animation 1: The application of computer graphics for the preparation of moving sequences for commercial advertising, education, or other purposes; often in video format and usually having the sequence as the end product. 2: Any graphic method where the illusion of motion is produced by rapid viewing of individually generated frames in a sequence." (Lath 91) These definitions are too narrow to the role of animation, as it has developed over the last years. Since its beginning in the early thirties, animation has been, on the one hand, an application in its own right. This is covered in the above definitions: nowadays, on the other hand, animation provides a set of tools, or is the basic technology for several other applications of computer graphics and related areas. These include: Scientific Visualization: "having the objective of representing data to that visual patterns will show relationships between the data" (Lath 91). Much of the data is time-dependent and thus animation plays a role. Visual Simulation (CGI Systems): broadly used as real-time systems for training purposes in flight or traffic simulations. Animated objects like walking figures, etc. and other more realistic illusions of a reality taken from animation technology gain more and more importance. Virtual Reality (coined by Jaron Lanier 1987): a new term for visual simulation focusing on user interaction through the use of helmet mounted displays for example and interaction devices, like data glove. Techniques are taken from either visual simulation systems or animation systems. Multimedia: after having completed the device-dependent early stages of development, developments such as DVI or CD-I, one has nowadays gained device-independence. Moreover, animation is in the process of becoming an integral part of multimedia. User interaction is crucial for this application. Model-based image coding and tele-presence have gained much attention because they promise an optimal coding and interchange of real images, based on techniques originally developed for animation systems (see figure 1). All listed applications and many more share a principle objective: To communicate information via images. If this is not limited to static frames, then animation techniques play a role. Animation principles are now a basic technology and research basis for many applications. Existing animation systems, which have been well established at a product level for purposes of communication design over the last ten years, do not fulfill the general requirements for a tool box to be used in many applications and circumstances. Usually these systems are more or less closed and focus on one application only. The purpose of this paper is to show the basic importance and relevance of animation for many modern applications. It is organized in accordance to the traditional animation pipeline, see figure 2. Each level of this pipeline is briefly described and main attention is given to the relationship to other areas, focusing on integration issues and/or how to use those functions in other applications. Finally for one application area, scientific visualization, the many relationships with animation are highlighted as an example.(IGD) The term animation has a Greek (animos) as well as a Roman (anima) root. To animate is, literally, to bring to life. The main aspect of life is the change over time. Modern definitions based on the role in computer graphics are as follows: "Animation 1: The application of computer graphics for the preparation of moving sequences for commercial advertising, education, or other purposes; often in video format and usually having the sequence as the end product. 2: Any graphic method where the illusion of motion is produced by rapid viewing of individually generated frames in a sequence." (Lath 91) These definitions are too narrow to the role of animation, as it has developed over the last years. Since its beginning in the early thirties, animation has been, on the one hand, an application in its own right. This is covered in the above definitions: nowadays, on the other hand, animation provides a set of tools, or is the basic technology for several other applications of computer graphics and related areas. These include: Scientific Visualization: "having the objective of representing data to that visual patterns will show relationships between the data" (Lath 91). Much of the data is time-dependent and thus animation plays a role. Visual Simulation (CGI Systems): broadly used as real-time systems for training purposes in flight or traffic simulations. Animated objects like walking figures, etc. and other more realistic illusions of a reality taken from animation technology gain more and more importance. Virtual Reality (coined by Jaron Lanier 1987): a new term for visual simulation focusing on user interaction through the use of helmet mounted displays for example and interaction devices, like data glove. Techniques are taken from either visual simulation systems or animation systems. Multimedia: after having completed the device-dependent early stages of development, developments such as DVI or CD-I, one has nowadays gained device-independence. Moreover, animation is in the process of becoming an integral part of multimedia. User interaction is crucial for this application. Model-based image coding and tele-presence have gained much attention because they promise an optimal coding and interchange of real images, based on techniques originally developed for animation systems (see figure 1). All listed applications and many more share a principle objective: To communicate information via images. If this is not limited to static frames, then animation techniques play a role. Animation principles are now a basic technology and research basis for many applications. Existing animation systems, which have been well established at a product level for purposes of communication design over the last ten years, do not fulfill the general requirements for a tool box to be used in many applications and circumstances. Usually these systems are more or less closed and focus on one application only. The purpose of this paper is to show the basic importance and relevance of animation for many modern applications. It is organized in accordance to the traditional animation pipeline, see figure 2. Each level of this pipeline is briefly described and main attention is given to the relationship to other areas, focusing on integration issues and/or how to use those functions in other applications. Finally for one application area, scientific visualization, the many relationships with animation are highlighted as an example.(IGD)

Item Type: Book Section
Erschienen: 1993
Creators: Krömker, Detlef and Englert, Gabriele and Haas, Stefan and Klement, Edwin and Loseries, Fritz and Müller, Wolfgang (GRIS) and Sakas, Georgios and Vohsbeck-Petermann, Ralf and de Martino, Josè Mario and Encarnação, José L.
Title: Advanced Research and Development Topics in Animation and Scientific Visualization
Language: English
Abstract:

The term animation has a Greek (animos) as well as a Roman (anima) root. To animate is, literally, to bring to life. The main aspect of life is the change over time. Modern definitions based on the role in computer graphics are as follows: "Animation 1: The application of computer graphics for the preparation of moving sequences for commercial advertising, education, or other purposes; often in video format and usually having the sequence as the end product. 2: Any graphic method where the illusion of motion is produced by rapid viewing of individually generated frames in a sequence." (Lath 91) These definitions are too narrow to the role of animation, as it has developed over the last years. Since its beginning in the early thirties, animation has been, on the one hand, an application in its own right. This is covered in the above definitions: nowadays, on the other hand, animation provides a set of tools, or is the basic technology for several other applications of computer graphics and related areas. These include: Scientific Visualization: "having the objective of representing data to that visual patterns will show relationships between the data" (Lath 91). Much of the data is time-dependent and thus animation plays a role. Visual Simulation (CGI Systems): broadly used as real-time systems for training purposes in flight or traffic simulations. Animated objects like walking figures, etc. and other more realistic illusions of a reality taken from animation technology gain more and more importance. Virtual Reality (coined by Jaron Lanier 1987): a new term for visual simulation focusing on user interaction through the use of helmet mounted displays for example and interaction devices, like data glove. Techniques are taken from either visual simulation systems or animation systems. Multimedia: after having completed the device-dependent early stages of development, developments such as DVI or CD-I, one has nowadays gained device-independence. Moreover, animation is in the process of becoming an integral part of multimedia. User interaction is crucial for this application. Model-based image coding and tele-presence have gained much attention because they promise an optimal coding and interchange of real images, based on techniques originally developed for animation systems (see figure 1). All listed applications and many more share a principle objective: To communicate information via images. If this is not limited to static frames, then animation techniques play a role. Animation principles are now a basic technology and research basis for many applications. Existing animation systems, which have been well established at a product level for purposes of communication design over the last ten years, do not fulfill the general requirements for a tool box to be used in many applications and circumstances. Usually these systems are more or less closed and focus on one application only. The purpose of this paper is to show the basic importance and relevance of animation for many modern applications. It is organized in accordance to the traditional animation pipeline, see figure 2. Each level of this pipeline is briefly described and main attention is given to the relationship to other areas, focusing on integration issues and/or how to use those functions in other applications. Finally for one application area, scientific visualization, the many relationships with animation are highlighted as an example.(IGD) The term animation has a Greek (animos) as well as a Roman (anima) root. To animate is, literally, to bring to life. The main aspect of life is the change over time. Modern definitions based on the role in computer graphics are as follows: "Animation 1: The application of computer graphics for the preparation of moving sequences for commercial advertising, education, or other purposes; often in video format and usually having the sequence as the end product. 2: Any graphic method where the illusion of motion is produced by rapid viewing of individually generated frames in a sequence." (Lath 91) These definitions are too narrow to the role of animation, as it has developed over the last years. Since its beginning in the early thirties, animation has been, on the one hand, an application in its own right. This is covered in the above definitions: nowadays, on the other hand, animation provides a set of tools, or is the basic technology for several other applications of computer graphics and related areas. These include: Scientific Visualization: "having the objective of representing data to that visual patterns will show relationships between the data" (Lath 91). Much of the data is time-dependent and thus animation plays a role. Visual Simulation (CGI Systems): broadly used as real-time systems for training purposes in flight or traffic simulations. Animated objects like walking figures, etc. and other more realistic illusions of a reality taken from animation technology gain more and more importance. Virtual Reality (coined by Jaron Lanier 1987): a new term for visual simulation focusing on user interaction through the use of helmet mounted displays for example and interaction devices, like data glove. Techniques are taken from either visual simulation systems or animation systems. Multimedia: after having completed the device-dependent early stages of development, developments such as DVI or CD-I, one has nowadays gained device-independence. Moreover, animation is in the process of becoming an integral part of multimedia. User interaction is crucial for this application. Model-based image coding and tele-presence have gained much attention because they promise an optimal coding and interchange of real images, based on techniques originally developed for animation systems (see figure 1). All listed applications and many more share a principle objective: To communicate information via images. If this is not limited to static frames, then animation techniques play a role. Animation principles are now a basic technology and research basis for many applications. Existing animation systems, which have been well established at a product level for purposes of communication design over the last ten years, do not fulfill the general requirements for a tool box to be used in many applications and circumstances. Usually these systems are more or less closed and focus on one application only. The purpose of this paper is to show the basic importance and relevance of animation for many modern applications. It is organized in accordance to the traditional animation pipeline, see figure 2. Each level of this pipeline is briefly described and main attention is given to the relationship to other areas, focusing on integration issues and/or how to use those functions in other applications. Finally for one application area, scientific visualization, the many relationships with animation are highlighted as an example.(IGD)

Publisher: Academic Press, London
Uncontrolled Keywords: Animation, Coloring, Geometric modeling, Post processing, Rendering, Scene generations, Scientific visualization, Texturing, Post recording
Divisions: UNSPECIFIED
20 Department of Computer Science
20 Department of Computer Science > Interactive Graphics Systems
Date Deposited: 16 Apr 2018 09:09
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