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A method for the estimation of an Origin-Destination matrix based on traffic counts for southern Brazil

Lacouture, Etienne (2016):
A method for the estimation of an Origin-Destination matrix based on traffic counts for southern Brazil.
TU Darmstadt, [Master Thesis]

Abstract

Introduction The transport sector and particularly the freight transport sector have a negative impact on air pollution and public infrastructure. In this context, the task of freight transport modeling is essential, as it enables to control the positive and negative effects that the freight transport sector can bring. It is all the more relevant in the case of Brazil. Indeed, the research presented in this Master Thesis has been motivated by the fact that the transport flows in Brazil are believed to change quite fast, as its population and structure increase significantly. One of the most crucial requirements for transportation planning consists there in the knowledge of the Origin/Destination pattern, which could help very much decision makers take decisions at the national level. Of course, various methods already exist that achieve this goal. Some of the most simple and intuitive of all are for example large scale surveys, which do not need any mathematical development but do necessitate the time and budget to work on significant sample of freight travels. However, traf-fic counting is nowadays a standardized and much more comfortable means of acquisition of real in-formation about circulation. Their use in the construction of Origin/Destination matrices could be use-ful as they would enable the direct use of some values as input and limit-condition which would be known to be true. As a consequence, the goal of this Master Thesis is to develop a model that estimates an Origin-Destination matrix specifically based on traffic counts for Southern Brazil. More specifically, the re-search area consists in the Brazilian states of Rio Grande do Sul (RS) and Santa Catarina (SC).

State of the research The first part of this essay consists in a literature analysis that focuses on models that rely on roadside traffic counts between regions as an input for the estimation of an Origin/Destination matrix. Of course, a brief development on the state of the art of freight transport demand modeling is also provided. Especially, the four-step approach, which constitutes the most common analysis tool sued for macroscopic transportation modeling, is presented. Some models of trip distribution and of route as-signment, which form the second and fourth step, are notably presented. Then, their interdependen-cies with each other as well as with potential traffic volumes data are developed, along with models that already use traffic counts as input for the estimation of an Origin/Destination matrix. The focus is put on the model which was developed by Chen in 1990 [Yu-Sen Chen, 1990], and that serves as ba-sis for the model which this thesis develops afterwards.

Model development Part 3 takes into consideration the advantages and disadvantages of the existing models. Then, explanations on the proper functioning of a new model is developed, as well as a detailed insight in its technical computation. The Software Maple is used, because its language is one of the easiest and most intuitive to understand. Very briefly, the functioning of the model is the following one: First of all, an algorithm determines the three best paths between all origins and destinations as well as their lengths. The identification and calculation of the first best paths are achieved using the Dijkstra algorithm. Indeed, the central issue of this paper does not involve any negative arcs, so there is no possibility that the Dijkstra algorithm, which gives very interesting results in terms of time and space complexity, may not be applicable. Moreover, the method of identification and calculation of the second and third best paths consist in modifications of previous existing solutions [Yen, 1970]. It starts by considering the Dijkstra solution for the first best path. Then it basically considers the nodes and links identified by Dijkstra and computes the algorithm again while forcing to travel through at least a node which had not been visited by Dijkstra. This method offers the advantage of reusing directly the first and simple implementation of the Dijkstra Algorithm. As a second step, the application of a Logit model with a certain coefficient enables to build an initial traffic allocation. Then, thanks to an initial Origin/Destination matrix

Item Type: Master Thesis
Erschienen: 2016
Creators: Lacouture, Etienne
Title: A method for the estimation of an Origin-Destination matrix based on traffic counts for southern Brazil
Language: English
Abstract:

Introduction The transport sector and particularly the freight transport sector have a negative impact on air pollution and public infrastructure. In this context, the task of freight transport modeling is essential, as it enables to control the positive and negative effects that the freight transport sector can bring. It is all the more relevant in the case of Brazil. Indeed, the research presented in this Master Thesis has been motivated by the fact that the transport flows in Brazil are believed to change quite fast, as its population and structure increase significantly. One of the most crucial requirements for transportation planning consists there in the knowledge of the Origin/Destination pattern, which could help very much decision makers take decisions at the national level. Of course, various methods already exist that achieve this goal. Some of the most simple and intuitive of all are for example large scale surveys, which do not need any mathematical development but do necessitate the time and budget to work on significant sample of freight travels. However, traf-fic counting is nowadays a standardized and much more comfortable means of acquisition of real in-formation about circulation. Their use in the construction of Origin/Destination matrices could be use-ful as they would enable the direct use of some values as input and limit-condition which would be known to be true. As a consequence, the goal of this Master Thesis is to develop a model that estimates an Origin-Destination matrix specifically based on traffic counts for Southern Brazil. More specifically, the re-search area consists in the Brazilian states of Rio Grande do Sul (RS) and Santa Catarina (SC).

State of the research The first part of this essay consists in a literature analysis that focuses on models that rely on roadside traffic counts between regions as an input for the estimation of an Origin/Destination matrix. Of course, a brief development on the state of the art of freight transport demand modeling is also provided. Especially, the four-step approach, which constitutes the most common analysis tool sued for macroscopic transportation modeling, is presented. Some models of trip distribution and of route as-signment, which form the second and fourth step, are notably presented. Then, their interdependen-cies with each other as well as with potential traffic volumes data are developed, along with models that already use traffic counts as input for the estimation of an Origin/Destination matrix. The focus is put on the model which was developed by Chen in 1990 [Yu-Sen Chen, 1990], and that serves as ba-sis for the model which this thesis develops afterwards.

Model development Part 3 takes into consideration the advantages and disadvantages of the existing models. Then, explanations on the proper functioning of a new model is developed, as well as a detailed insight in its technical computation. The Software Maple is used, because its language is one of the easiest and most intuitive to understand. Very briefly, the functioning of the model is the following one: First of all, an algorithm determines the three best paths between all origins and destinations as well as their lengths. The identification and calculation of the first best paths are achieved using the Dijkstra algorithm. Indeed, the central issue of this paper does not involve any negative arcs, so there is no possibility that the Dijkstra algorithm, which gives very interesting results in terms of time and space complexity, may not be applicable. Moreover, the method of identification and calculation of the second and third best paths consist in modifications of previous existing solutions [Yen, 1970]. It starts by considering the Dijkstra solution for the first best path. Then it basically considers the nodes and links identified by Dijkstra and computes the algorithm again while forcing to travel through at least a node which had not been visited by Dijkstra. This method offers the advantage of reusing directly the first and simple implementation of the Dijkstra Algorithm. As a second step, the application of a Logit model with a certain coefficient enables to build an initial traffic allocation. Then, thanks to an initial Origin/Destination matrix

Divisions: 13 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Sciences
13 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Sciences > Institutes of Transportation
13 Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Sciences > Institutes of Transportation > Institute for Transport Planning and Traffic Engineering
Date Deposited: 28 Jan 2018 15:29
Official URL: https://www.verkehr.tu-darmstadt.de/media/verkehr/fgvv/beruf...
Referees: Boltze, Prof. Dr. Manfred and Rolko, M. Sc. Kevin
Refereed / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 2016
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