TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Memory-Efficient and Parallel Simulation of Super Carbon Nanotubes

Burger, Michael :
Memory-Efficient and Parallel Simulation of Super Carbon Nanotubes.
[Online-Edition: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/6229]
Technische Universität , Darmstadt
[Dissertation], (2017)

Offizielle URL: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/6229

Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract)

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) received much attention since their description in Nature in 1991. In principle, a carbon nanotube is a rolled up sheet of graphene, which can be imagined as a honeycomb grid of carbon atoms. This allotrope of carbon has many interesting properties like high tensile strength at very low weight or its high temperature resistance. This motivates the application of CNTs in material science to create new carbon nanotube enforced materials. They also possess interesting electronic properties since CNTs show either metallic or semiconducting behavior, depending on their configuration. The synthesis of branched carbon nanotubes allows the connection of straight CNTs to carbon nanotubes networks with branched tubes employed as junction elements. One of these networks are the so-called super carbon nanotubes (SCNTs) that were proposed in 2006. In that case, each carbon-carbon bond within the honeycomb grid is replaced by a CNT of equal size and each carbon atom by a Y-branched tube with three arms of equal length and a regular angle of 120° between the arms. This results in a structure that originates from tubes and regains the outer shape of a tube. It is also possible to repeat this process, replacing carbon-carbon bonds not with CNTs but with SCNTs, leading to very regular and self-similar structures of increasingly higher orders. Simulations demonstrate that the SCNTs also exhibit very interesting mechanical properties. They are even more flexible than CNTs and thus are good candidates for high strength com- posites or actuators with very low weight. Other applications arise again in microelectronics because of their configurable electronic behavior and in biology due to the biocompatibility of SCNTs. Despite progress in synthesizing processes for straight and branched CNTs, the production of SCNTs is still beyond current technological capabilities. In addition, real experiments at nanoscale are expensive and complex and hence, simulations are important to predict properties of SCNTs and to guide the experimental research. The atomic-scale finite element method (AFEM) already provides a well-established approach for simulations of CNTs at the atomic level. However, the model size of SCNTs grows very fast for larger tubes and the arising n-body and linear equation systems quickly exceed the memory capacity of available computer systems. This renders infeasible the simulation of large SCNTs on an atomic level, unless the regular structure of SCNTs can be taken into account to reduce the memory footprint. This thesis presents ways to exploit the symmetry and hierarchy within SCNTs enabling the simulation of higher order SCNTs. We develop structure-tailored and memory-saving data struc- tures which allow the storage of very large SCNTs models up to several billions of atoms while providing fast data access. We realize this with a novel graph data structure called Compressed Symmetric Graphs which is able to dynamically recompute large parts of structural information for tubes instead of storing them. We also present a new structure-aware and SMP-parallelized matrix-free solver for the linear equation systems involving the stiffness matrix, which employs an efficient caching mechanism for the data during the sparse matrix-vector multiplication. The matrix-free solver is twice as fast as a compressed row storage format-based reference solver, requiring only half the memory while caching all contributions of the matrix employed. We demonstrate that this solver, in combination with the Compressed Symmetric Graphs, is able to instantiate equation systems with matrices of an order higher than 5∗10^7 on a single compute node, while still fully caching all matrix data.

Typ des Eintrags: Dissertation
Erschienen: 2017
Autor(en): Burger, Michael
Titel: Memory-Efficient and Parallel Simulation of Super Carbon Nanotubes
Sprache: Englisch
Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract):

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) received much attention since their description in Nature in 1991. In principle, a carbon nanotube is a rolled up sheet of graphene, which can be imagined as a honeycomb grid of carbon atoms. This allotrope of carbon has many interesting properties like high tensile strength at very low weight or its high temperature resistance. This motivates the application of CNTs in material science to create new carbon nanotube enforced materials. They also possess interesting electronic properties since CNTs show either metallic or semiconducting behavior, depending on their configuration. The synthesis of branched carbon nanotubes allows the connection of straight CNTs to carbon nanotubes networks with branched tubes employed as junction elements. One of these networks are the so-called super carbon nanotubes (SCNTs) that were proposed in 2006. In that case, each carbon-carbon bond within the honeycomb grid is replaced by a CNT of equal size and each carbon atom by a Y-branched tube with three arms of equal length and a regular angle of 120° between the arms. This results in a structure that originates from tubes and regains the outer shape of a tube. It is also possible to repeat this process, replacing carbon-carbon bonds not with CNTs but with SCNTs, leading to very regular and self-similar structures of increasingly higher orders. Simulations demonstrate that the SCNTs also exhibit very interesting mechanical properties. They are even more flexible than CNTs and thus are good candidates for high strength com- posites or actuators with very low weight. Other applications arise again in microelectronics because of their configurable electronic behavior and in biology due to the biocompatibility of SCNTs. Despite progress in synthesizing processes for straight and branched CNTs, the production of SCNTs is still beyond current technological capabilities. In addition, real experiments at nanoscale are expensive and complex and hence, simulations are important to predict properties of SCNTs and to guide the experimental research. The atomic-scale finite element method (AFEM) already provides a well-established approach for simulations of CNTs at the atomic level. However, the model size of SCNTs grows very fast for larger tubes and the arising n-body and linear equation systems quickly exceed the memory capacity of available computer systems. This renders infeasible the simulation of large SCNTs on an atomic level, unless the regular structure of SCNTs can be taken into account to reduce the memory footprint. This thesis presents ways to exploit the symmetry and hierarchy within SCNTs enabling the simulation of higher order SCNTs. We develop structure-tailored and memory-saving data struc- tures which allow the storage of very large SCNTs models up to several billions of atoms while providing fast data access. We realize this with a novel graph data structure called Compressed Symmetric Graphs which is able to dynamically recompute large parts of structural information for tubes instead of storing them. We also present a new structure-aware and SMP-parallelized matrix-free solver for the linear equation systems involving the stiffness matrix, which employs an efficient caching mechanism for the data during the sparse matrix-vector multiplication. The matrix-free solver is twice as fast as a compressed row storage format-based reference solver, requiring only half the memory while caching all contributions of the matrix employed. We demonstrate that this solver, in combination with the Compressed Symmetric Graphs, is able to instantiate equation systems with matrices of an order higher than 5∗10^7 on a single compute node, while still fully caching all matrix data.

Ort: Darmstadt
Fachbereich(e)/-gebiet(e): 20 Fachbereich Informatik > Parallele Programmierung
20 Fachbereich Informatik > Scientific Computing
20 Fachbereich Informatik > Simulation, Systemoptimierung und Robotik
20 Fachbereich Informatik
Hinterlegungsdatum: 21 Mai 2017 19:55
Offizielle URL: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/6229
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-62292
Gutachter / Prüfer: Bischof, Prof. Dr. Christian ; Bücker, Prof. Dr. Martin ; Wackerfuß, Prof. Dr. Jens
Datum der Begutachtung bzw. der mündlichen Prüfung / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 5 Mai 2017
Alternatives oder übersetztes Abstract:
AbstractSprache
Kohlenstoffnanoröhren (engl. carbon nanotubes, kurz CTNs) haben seit ihrer Beschreibung in einem Nature-Artikel im Jahr 1991 viel Beachtung erfahren. Eine Kohlenstoffnanoröhren ist prinzipiell ein aufgerolltes Stück Graphen, welches man sich als ein zweidimensionales Gitter aus Kohlenstoffatomen vorstellen kann, in dem die Atome in einem Bienenwabenmuster ange- ordnet sind. Dieses Allotrop des Kohlenstoffs weist einige sehr interessante Eigenschaften auf, darunter eine sehr hohe Zugfestigkeit bei geringem Gewicht oder hohe Temperaturbeständig- keit. Diese Eigenschaften motivieren Forschungen in denen versucht wird, mittels CNTs neue Materialen zu erzeugen oder bestehende Materialien durch Integration von CNTs zu verstärken. Des Weiteren haben CNTs interessante elektronische Eigenschaften, da sie sich, abhängig von ihrem Syntheseprozess, bezüglich ihrer Leitfähigkeit wie Metalle oder wie Halbleiter verhalten können. Die Synthese sich verzweigender Kohlenstoffnanoröhren ermöglicht es, diese als Verbindungs- glieder für geradlinige CNTs einzusetzen und somit Netzwerke aus Röhren zu generieren. Eines dieser Netzwerke sind die im Jahr 2006 vorgestellten super carbon nanotubes (SCNTs). In die- sen Strukturen wird jede Kohlenstoff-Kohlenstoff-Bindung im Atomgitter durch gleichförmige CNTs und jedes Atom mit einem Y-förmig verzweigten Röhrchen ersetzt. Diese Y-Verzweigung besitzt drei Arme mit gleicher Länge und Durchmesser, die zu ihrem Nachbararmen jeweils um 120° rotiert sind. Hieraus entsteht ein röhrenförmiges Gebilde, welches aus kleineren Röhr- chen geformt wird. Es besteht die Möglichkeit diesen Konstruktionsprozess zu wiederholen. Die Kohlenstoff-Bindungen im Gitter werden hierbei nicht mit CNTs, sondern mit SCNTs ersetzt, was zu einer sehr regulären Struktur höherer Ordnung führt. Mittels computergestützter Simulationen konnte gezeigt werden, dass SCNTs ebenso wie CNTs interessante mechanische Eigenschaften aufweisen. Sie sind noch flexibler als CNTs, was sie zu einer guten Grundlage für die Erforschung neuartiger besonders zugfester und dehnbarer Materialien macht. Andere Anwendungsgebiete sind auch mikroelektronische Schaltungen, da sich das elektronische Verhalten von SCNTs konfigurieren lässt, sowie, aufgrund ihrer Biokom- patibilität, die Biologie und Medizin. Trotz der Fortschritte bei den Syntheseverfahren für geradlinige und verzweigte CNTs liegt die Herstellung von SCNTs noch jenseits der technischen Möglichkeiten. Außerdem sind Expe- rimente mit Nanostrukturen teuer, komplex und fehleranfällig. Deshalb sind Simulationen von SCNTs wichtig, um deren Eigenschaften vorauszusagen und Richtlinien für die experimentel- le Forschung vorzugeben. Mit einer modifizierten Methode der Finiten Elemente für atomare Strukturen (engl. atomic-scale finite element method, kurz AFEM) existiert bereits ein fest eta- bliertes Verfahren zur Simulation von CNTs. Allerdings wächst die Modellgröße für größere SCNTs rasch an, was dazu führt, dass der Speicher moderner Rechner für die während der Simulation erforderlichen Mehrkörper – und Gleichungssysteme nicht ausreicht. So lange die reguläre Struktur von SCNTs nicht benutzt wird, um den Speicherverbrauch der Simulationen zu reduzieren, ist die Simulation großer SCNTs auf atomarer Ebene nicht möglich. Die vorlie- gende Arbeit zeigt Wege auf, die Symmetrie und Hierarchie innerhalb der SCNT Strukturen auszunutzen, um somit die Simulation großer SCNTs auf atomarer Ebene zu ermöglichen. Es werden spezielle Datenstrukturen beschrieben, die es ermöglichen sehr große SCNTs mit eini- gen Milliarden Atomen zu speichern und effizienten Zugriff auf die Daten bieten. Dies wird in der neuartigen Graph-Datenstruktur der Compressed Symmetric Graphs umgesetzt, die dyna- misch Teile der Strukturinformation der SCNTs wiederberechnen kann, anstatt sie abspeichern zu müssen. Ebenso wird ein neuer, parallelisierter und Matrix-freier Löser für die auftretenden linea- ren Gleichungssysteme vorgestellt, der einen effizienten Mechanismus zum Zwischenspeichern von Matrix-Beiträgen einsetzt. Er ist doppelt so schnell wie ein Referenzlöser, der mit einer im compressed-row-storage-Format gespeicherten Matrix arbeitet und benötigt dabei nur halb so viel Speicher, wenn alle Beiträge zur Matrix zwischengespeichert werden. Es wird gezeigt, dass es die Kombination dieses Lösers mit den Compressed Symmetric Graphs ermöglicht, auf ei- nem einzelnen Rechnenknoten Gleichungssysteme der Ordnung 5∗10^7 aufzustellen und dabei weiterhin die vollständigen Matrixdaten im Speicher zu halten.Deutsch
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

Eintrag anzeigen Eintrag anzeigen