TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Novel types of resistance of codling moth to Cydia pomonella granulovirus

Sauer, Annette Juliane :
Novel types of resistance of codling moth to Cydia pomonella granulovirus.
[Online-Edition: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/6210]
Technische Universität , Darmstadt
[Dissertation], (2017)

Offizielle URL: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/6210

Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract)

The Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV, Baculoviridae) is an important biological control agent to control codling moth (CM; Cydia pomonella, L.) in organic and integrated pome fruit and walnut production. The CpGV is highly host-specific and supremely virulent for early larval stages of CM, additionally safe for the environment and other animals and humans. Since 2005, resistance against the widely used Mexican isolate (CpGV-M) has been reported from different countries in Europe. Until now, over 40 apple orchards with resistance to CpGV-M based products were identified. For several CM field populations in Europe a Z-linked, monogenetic and dominant inheritance was proposed suggesting a highly similar mode of resistance, termed type I resistance. Type I resistance is targeted only against the isolate CpGV-M and specific the 24 bp insertion in its viral gene pe38. Some other CpGV isolates collected from infected larvae of different geographical regions, lacking this 24 bp repetitive insertion in their pe38 gene and caused virus infection in resistant larvae. Some of these isolates, e.g. CpGV-S, were eventually registered to re-establish the efficient control of CM larvae in the field. Recently, two CM field populations, called NRW-WE and SA-GO, with an untypically high resistance level against CpGV-M and other CpGV isolates, were identified and a novel resistance type II was proposed. This thesis focuses on the elucidation of their mode of inheritance and their cellular mechanism.

For generating genetically homogenous resistant strains out of the field population NRW-WE, larvae were selected by repeated mass crosses and selection under virus pressure, using the two isolates CpGV-M and CpGV-S, respectively. The resulting strains CpR5M and CpR5S showed a clear cross-resistance to both CpGV-M and CpGV-S. By crossing and backcrossing experiments between CpR5M or CpR5S and susceptible CM strain (CpS) an autosomal dominant and monogenetic inheritance of resistance was elucidated. The autosomal inheritance mode supported the evidence of a second type (type II) of resistance. Initially, an interchromosomal rearrangement involving the Z chromosome was hypothesized to explain the translocation from a Z-chromosomal to an autosomal inheritance. This hypothesis, however, could be clearly ruled out because a highly conserved synteny of all probed Z-linked genes was observed for different resistant CM strains when fluorescence in situ hybridization with marker genes (BAC-FISH) was applied.

Considering the cross-resistance in type II resistance, CM larvae were treated with single or mixtures of the isolates CpGV-M and CpGV-S. For these treatments no virus infection was observed but a recombinant of CpGV-M containing the pe38 gene of CpGV-S caused high mortality. The results indicated that beyond the known pe38 related mechanism of type I resistance against CpGV-M, a second mechanism seemed to exist in type II resistance. With CpR5M and CpS budded viruses injections, circumventing initial midgut infection, gave further evidence that resistance against CpGV-S is midgut-related. A fluoresecence-quenching assay using rhodamin-18 labeled occlusion derived viruses could not fully elucidate whether receptor binding or an intercellular midgut factor is involved in type II resistance. The results led to the model of two different but genetically linked resistance mechanisms in the type II resistant CM larvae: resistance against CpGV-M is systemic and targeted against the pe38 gene, whereas resistance against CpGV-S is based on an unidentified midgut factor, inhibiting initiation of infection.

A further CM field population, termed SA-GO, was also investigated for the biological and genetic background of CpGV resistance. Crossing experiments between CpS and field collected larvae of SA-GO, followed by resistance testing with two CpGV isolates revealed differences in the susceptibility and the mode of inheritance compared to the one found in type I or type II resistance of CM. Single-pair inbreeding generated the genetically more homogenous resistant strain CpRGO. Reciprocal hybrid crosses and backcrosses between individuals of CpRGO and susceptible CpS observed a dominant and polygenic inheritance of resistance in the majority of crosses. Resistance to CpGV-S appeared to be autosomal and dominant for larval survivorship but recessive when success of pupation of the hybrids was considered. Resistance of CpRGO to CpGV-M however, is proposed to be both autosomal and Z-linked inherited, since only male larvae were able to pupate, similar to the type I resistance. CpRGO was therefore termed type III resistance.

When the efficacy of different CpGV isolates classified to all known CpGV genome groups (A - E) was tested with neonates of all resistant strains. CpGV isolates of the genome groups B and C were able to cause significant mortality in larvae of all resistance types. In addition, CpGV of genome group D caused high mortality in type III resistant CM strain, whereas type I resistance was broken by all known CpGV genome groups, except group A. When isolates of commercial CpGV products were tested in the resistant CM strains, it was found that the commercially used CpGV isolates R5 and 0006 did break only type I and type III resistance, whereas isolate V15 was able to cause high mortality in all resistant types.

In conclusion, two types of CpGV resistance, type II and type III were identified and showed a high heterogeneity in their mode of inheritance, mode of action and response to CpGV isolates of different genome groups. The major finding of this thesis is that field resistance of CM to CpGV is genetically and functionally variable and needs to be carefully addressed when resistance management strategies are developed for CM control in the field.

Typ des Eintrags: Dissertation
Erschienen: 2017
Autor(en): Sauer, Annette Juliane
Titel: Novel types of resistance of codling moth to Cydia pomonella granulovirus
Sprache: Englisch
Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract):

The Cydia pomonella granulovirus (CpGV, Baculoviridae) is an important biological control agent to control codling moth (CM; Cydia pomonella, L.) in organic and integrated pome fruit and walnut production. The CpGV is highly host-specific and supremely virulent for early larval stages of CM, additionally safe for the environment and other animals and humans. Since 2005, resistance against the widely used Mexican isolate (CpGV-M) has been reported from different countries in Europe. Until now, over 40 apple orchards with resistance to CpGV-M based products were identified. For several CM field populations in Europe a Z-linked, monogenetic and dominant inheritance was proposed suggesting a highly similar mode of resistance, termed type I resistance. Type I resistance is targeted only against the isolate CpGV-M and specific the 24 bp insertion in its viral gene pe38. Some other CpGV isolates collected from infected larvae of different geographical regions, lacking this 24 bp repetitive insertion in their pe38 gene and caused virus infection in resistant larvae. Some of these isolates, e.g. CpGV-S, were eventually registered to re-establish the efficient control of CM larvae in the field. Recently, two CM field populations, called NRW-WE and SA-GO, with an untypically high resistance level against CpGV-M and other CpGV isolates, were identified and a novel resistance type II was proposed. This thesis focuses on the elucidation of their mode of inheritance and their cellular mechanism.

For generating genetically homogenous resistant strains out of the field population NRW-WE, larvae were selected by repeated mass crosses and selection under virus pressure, using the two isolates CpGV-M and CpGV-S, respectively. The resulting strains CpR5M and CpR5S showed a clear cross-resistance to both CpGV-M and CpGV-S. By crossing and backcrossing experiments between CpR5M or CpR5S and susceptible CM strain (CpS) an autosomal dominant and monogenetic inheritance of resistance was elucidated. The autosomal inheritance mode supported the evidence of a second type (type II) of resistance. Initially, an interchromosomal rearrangement involving the Z chromosome was hypothesized to explain the translocation from a Z-chromosomal to an autosomal inheritance. This hypothesis, however, could be clearly ruled out because a highly conserved synteny of all probed Z-linked genes was observed for different resistant CM strains when fluorescence in situ hybridization with marker genes (BAC-FISH) was applied.

Considering the cross-resistance in type II resistance, CM larvae were treated with single or mixtures of the isolates CpGV-M and CpGV-S. For these treatments no virus infection was observed but a recombinant of CpGV-M containing the pe38 gene of CpGV-S caused high mortality. The results indicated that beyond the known pe38 related mechanism of type I resistance against CpGV-M, a second mechanism seemed to exist in type II resistance. With CpR5M and CpS budded viruses injections, circumventing initial midgut infection, gave further evidence that resistance against CpGV-S is midgut-related. A fluoresecence-quenching assay using rhodamin-18 labeled occlusion derived viruses could not fully elucidate whether receptor binding or an intercellular midgut factor is involved in type II resistance. The results led to the model of two different but genetically linked resistance mechanisms in the type II resistant CM larvae: resistance against CpGV-M is systemic and targeted against the pe38 gene, whereas resistance against CpGV-S is based on an unidentified midgut factor, inhibiting initiation of infection.

A further CM field population, termed SA-GO, was also investigated for the biological and genetic background of CpGV resistance. Crossing experiments between CpS and field collected larvae of SA-GO, followed by resistance testing with two CpGV isolates revealed differences in the susceptibility and the mode of inheritance compared to the one found in type I or type II resistance of CM. Single-pair inbreeding generated the genetically more homogenous resistant strain CpRGO. Reciprocal hybrid crosses and backcrosses between individuals of CpRGO and susceptible CpS observed a dominant and polygenic inheritance of resistance in the majority of crosses. Resistance to CpGV-S appeared to be autosomal and dominant for larval survivorship but recessive when success of pupation of the hybrids was considered. Resistance of CpRGO to CpGV-M however, is proposed to be both autosomal and Z-linked inherited, since only male larvae were able to pupate, similar to the type I resistance. CpRGO was therefore termed type III resistance.

When the efficacy of different CpGV isolates classified to all known CpGV genome groups (A - E) was tested with neonates of all resistant strains. CpGV isolates of the genome groups B and C were able to cause significant mortality in larvae of all resistance types. In addition, CpGV of genome group D caused high mortality in type III resistant CM strain, whereas type I resistance was broken by all known CpGV genome groups, except group A. When isolates of commercial CpGV products were tested in the resistant CM strains, it was found that the commercially used CpGV isolates R5 and 0006 did break only type I and type III resistance, whereas isolate V15 was able to cause high mortality in all resistant types.

In conclusion, two types of CpGV resistance, type II and type III were identified and showed a high heterogeneity in their mode of inheritance, mode of action and response to CpGV isolates of different genome groups. The major finding of this thesis is that field resistance of CM to CpGV is genetically and functionally variable and needs to be carefully addressed when resistance management strategies are developed for CM control in the field.

Ort: Darmstadt
Fachbereich(e)/-gebiet(e): 10 Fachbereich Biologie
Hinterlegungsdatum: 21 Mai 2017 19:55
Offizielle URL: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/6210
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-62102
Gutachter / Prüfer: Jehle, Prof. Dr. Johannes A. ; Thiel, Prof. Dr. Gerhard
Datum der Begutachtung bzw. der mündlichen Prüfung / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 10 April 2017
Alternatives oder übersetztes Abstract:
AbstractSprache
Das Cydia pomonella Granulovirus (CpGV) ist ein wichtiges Mittel zur biologischen Bekämpfung von Larven des Apfelwicklers (Cydia pomonella) im integrierten und ökologischen Apfelanbau. CpGV-Mittel stellen eine sehr wirksame und äußerst wirtsspezifische, nützlings- und umweltschonende Alternative zu chemischen Pflanzenschutzmitteln dar. Im Jahre 2005 wurde erstmals von einer Resistenz des Apfelwicklers gegen das damals ausschließlich eingesetzte Isolat CpGV-M berichtet. Bis heute sind mehr als 40 Apfelwickler-Populationen mit einer Minderempfindlichkeit gegen dieses Isolat im europäischen Obstbau bekannt. In Kreuzungsexperimenten wurde für einige dieser Freilandpopulationen eine monogenetische, dominante und geschlechtsgebundene (Z-chromosomale) Vererbung festgestellt. Dieser Befund führte zu der Annahme, dass eine ähnliche Resistenz in den betroffenen Populationen vorliegt, welche als Typ I-Resistenz bezeichnet wurde. Dieser Resistenz-Typus ist offensichtlich gegen eine 24 bp lange, repetitive Insertion im viralen Gen pe38 von CpGV-M gerichtet, denn andere CpGV-Isolate, z.B. das Isolat CpGV-S, ohne diese Insertion zeigten weiterhin eine gute Wirkung gegen Apfelwickler mit Typ I-Resistenz. Einige von ihnen, sind mittlerweile als Pflanzenschutzmittel zugelassen. Diese resistenzbrechenden Isolate gehören den phylogenetischen Genomgruppen B–E von CpGV an, während CpGV-M zur Genomgruppe A gehört. Zwei resistente Freilandpopulationen des Apfelwicklers namens NRW-WE und SA-GO zeigten eine außergewöhnlich stark ausgeprägte Resistenz gegen CpGV-M und andere resistenzbrechende CpGV-Isolate. Es wurde daher angenommen, dass es sich bei diesen Populationen um einen weiteren Resistenztypus (Typ II) handelt. Die beiden Populationen NRW-WE und SA-GO sind Gegenstand der vorliegend Arbeit und wurden hinsichtlich ihrer Resistenzvererbung und ihres zellulären Resistenzmechanismus gegen unterschiedliche CpGV-Isolate untersucht. Über fünf Generationen hinweg wurden in Massenkreuzungen Individuen von NRW-WE vermehrt und anschließend jeweils durch die beiden Isolate CpGV-M und CpGV-S selektiert. Hieraus resultierten die Apfelwickler-Stämme CpR5M und CpR5S. In beiden Stämmen konnte eine Kreuzresistenz zu beiden CpGV-Isolaten nachgewiesen werden. Durch Rückkreuzungsexperimente zwischen CpR5M bzw. CpR5S mit einem empfindlichen Apfelwickler-Laborstamm (CpS) und anschließende Resistenztests der Nachkommen konnte eine monogenetische und dominante, in diesem Falle aber autosomale Vererbung der Resistenz nachgewiesen werden, welche die Annahme eines zweiten Resistenztypus (Typ II) bestätigte. Als mögliche Erklärung für die Veränderung des festgestellten Resistenzlocus/gens von einem geschlechtsgebundenen zu einem autosomalen Chromosom wurde eine interchromosomale Umordnung unter Beteiligung des Z-Chromosoms vermutet. Diese Hypothese konnte durch Fluoreszenz-in-situ-Hybridisierungen mit 13 Z-chromosomalen Makergenen widerlegt werden, da die Z-Chromosme aller getesteten anfälligen und resistenten Apfelwickler-Stämme eine sehr ähnliche Architektur aufwiesen. Um die Kreuzresistenz in CpR5M und CpR5S weiter zu untersuchen, wurden Resistenztests mit Mischungen von CpGV-M und CpGV-S durchgeführt, wobei keine Virusinfektion nachgewiesen werden konnte. Bei Infektionsversuchen mit einer Rekombinanten von CpGV-M, deren pe38 Gen durch das pe38 des Isolates CpGV-S substituiert war, konnte hingegen eine sehr hohe Mortalität von CpR5M- und CpR5S-Larven erzielt werden. Die beobachtete Infektiosität dieser Rekombinanten führte zu der Hypothese, dass zwei unterschiedliche Resistenzmechanismen in der Typ II-Resistenz vorliegen müssen: Ein Resistenzmechanismus basiert wie bei der Typ I-Resistenz auf dem pe38 Gen für CpGV-M, ein zweiter Mechanismus muss gegen einen unbekannten Faktor von CpGV-S gerichtet sein. Zur weiteren Charakterisierung des unbekannten Resistenzmechanismus gegen CpGV-S wurden zwei vergleichende Untersuchungen in CpS- und CpR5M-Larven durchgeführt: (1) Injektionsversuche, zum Umgehen der Virusinfektion im Mitteldarm der Larven und (2) eine perorale Infektionen mit fluoreszenzmarkierten Viren, um deren Bindung und Fusion mit Mitteldarmepithelzellen zu quantifizieren. Ein signifikanter Unterschied zwischen Injektionen von CpGV-M und CpGV-S konnte festgestellt werden. Dies wies auf eine Resistenz gegen CpGV-S hin, die im Mitteldarm der Larve lokalisiert ist. Hingegen war kein signifikanter Unterschied in der Bindung von CpGV-M und CpGV-S an Mitteldarmepithelzellen von CpR5M festzustellen. Diese Ergebnisse lassen den Schluss zu, dass in CpR5M die Resistenz gegen CpGV-M sich von der Resistenz gegen CpGV-S in ihrem zellulären Mechanismus unterscheidet, der Eintritt des Virus in die Mitteldarmepithelzellen jedoch vermutlich nicht der direkte Zielort der Resistenz von CpGV-S ist. Für die zweite resistente Apfelwickler-Freilandpopulation SA-GO wurde durch Einzelpaarkreuzungen mit CpS nachgewiesen, dass die Resistenz ebenfalls gegen CpGV-M und CpGV-S gerichtet ist, sich aber sowohl von der Typ I, als auch von der Typ II Resistenz in ihrer Vererbung unterscheidet. Der aus SA-GO selektierte Stamm CpRGO wurde im Labor durch Einzelpaarkreuzungen und Resistenztestung etabliert. In den meisten reziproken Hybridkreuzungen mit CpS zeigte CpRGO in einem siebentägigen Test eine polygenetische und dominante Vererbung der Resistenz. Für die Resistenz gegen CpGV-S wird angenommen, dass die Vererbung für das Überleben der Larven autosomal und dominant ist, jedoch einen rezessiven Einfluss besitzt, wenn man die Anzahl der überlebenden Puppen in Betracht zieht. Für die Resistenz gegen CpGV-M zeigte sich zusätzlich ein Z-chromosmaler Einfluss der Vererbung, ähnlich der Typ I Resistenz, da ausschließlich männliche Larven die Virusbehandlung bis zur Verpuppung überlebten. Anhand dieser Ergebnisse wird für den resistenten Apfelwickler-Stamm CpRGO eine dritte (Typ III) Resistenz gegen verschiedene CpGV-Isolate angenommen. In einem umfassenden systematischen Resistenztest wurden CpGV-Isolate aus den verschiedenen Genomgruppen A-E hinsichtlich ihrer Virulenz in allen verfügbaren anfälligen und resistenten Apfelwickler-Stämmen untersucht, mit dem Ergebnis, dass nur CpGV-Isolate der Genomgruppe B und C in allen resistenten Stämmen Virusinfektionen auslösen konnten. Zusätzlich wirkten Isolate der Genomgruppe D auch gegen Larven mit Typ III-Resistenz. Für Larven der Typ I-Resistenz bestätigte sich, dass diese nur gegen CpGV-M (Genomgruppe A) resistent sind. Getestete kommerzielle CpGV-Mittel mit den Isolaten R5 und 0006 waren resistenzbrechend für Larven des Typs I und III, wohingegen das Isolat V15 alle resistenten Stämme nach 14 Tagen erfolgreich abtötete. Die Ergebnisse dieser Arbeit zeigen eine hohe Diversität der neuen CpGV-resistenten Apfelwickler-Stämme des Typs II und III gegen verschiedene CpGV-Isolate, sowohl in der Vererbung als auch im Resistenzmechanismus. Die genetische und funktionelle Vielfalt der Resistenzen des Apfelwicklers gegen CpGV-Produkte muss daher bei der Entwicklung geeigneter Resistenzmanagmentstrategien im Obstanbau sorgfältig beachtet werden.Deutsch
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

Eintrag anzeigen Eintrag anzeigen