TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Engineering PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase into an allosteric electrochemical Ca(2+) sensor.

Guo, Zhong and Johnston, Wayne A. and Stein, Viktor and Kalimuthu, Palraj and Perez-Alcala, Siro and Bernhardt, Paul V. and Alexandrov, Kirill :
Engineering PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase into an allosteric electrochemical Ca(2+) sensor.
In: Chemical communications (Cambridge, England), 52 (3) pp. 485-8. ISSN 1364-548X
[Article] , (2016)

Abstract

Electrochemical biosensors convert biological events to an electrical current. To date most electrochemical biosensors exploit activities of naturally occurring enzymes. Here we demonstrated that insertion of a calmodulin domain into the redox enzyme PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase resulted in a selective Ca(2+) biosensor that could be used to rapidly measure Ca(2+) concentrations in human biological fluids. We were able to convert a point-of-care glucometer into Ca(2+) monitor by refurbishing it with the developed biosensor. We propose that similar engineering strategies may be used to create highly specific electrochemical biosensors to other analytes. Compatibility with cheap and ubiquitous amperometric detectors is expected to accelerate progression of these biosensors into clinical applications.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2016
Creators: Guo, Zhong and Johnston, Wayne A. and Stein, Viktor and Kalimuthu, Palraj and Perez-Alcala, Siro and Bernhardt, Paul V. and Alexandrov, Kirill
Title: Engineering PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase into an allosteric electrochemical Ca(2+) sensor.
Language: English
Abstract:

Electrochemical biosensors convert biological events to an electrical current. To date most electrochemical biosensors exploit activities of naturally occurring enzymes. Here we demonstrated that insertion of a calmodulin domain into the redox enzyme PQQ-glucose dehydrogenase resulted in a selective Ca(2+) biosensor that could be used to rapidly measure Ca(2+) concentrations in human biological fluids. We were able to convert a point-of-care glucometer into Ca(2+) monitor by refurbishing it with the developed biosensor. We propose that similar engineering strategies may be used to create highly specific electrochemical biosensors to other analytes. Compatibility with cheap and ubiquitous amperometric detectors is expected to accelerate progression of these biosensors into clinical applications.

Journal or Publication Title: Chemical communications (Cambridge, England)
Volume: 52
Number: 3
Divisions: 10 Department of Biology
10 Department of Biology > Protein Engineering of Ion Conducting Nanopores
Date Deposited: 14 Nov 2016 11:25
Identification Number: pmid:26528736
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

View Item View Item