TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Molecular simulations of lipid bilayers in interactions with gold nanoparticles

Pfeiffer, Tobias :
Molecular simulations of lipid bilayers in interactions with gold nanoparticles.
[Online-Edition: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/5512]
Technische Universität , Darmstadt
[Masterarbeit], (2016)

Offizielle URL: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/5512

Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract)

Gold nanoparticles are interesting candidates for medical applications like markers in imaging methods and targeted drug delivery, especially to cancer cells. Unfortunately, many gold nanoparticles have been found to be cytotoxic even for healthy cells. For an application in humans the origin and the factors of this cytotoxicity need to be well understood. In the recent years, many studies have been conducted on nanoparticle cytotoxicity and cellular nanoparticle uptake. Most of them focussed on the penetration of cell membranes and the nanoparticle uptake mechanism. However, there is not much known about the influence of nanoparticles on the properties of intact membranes even though this information is crucial for the assessment of the risk that the use of nanoparticles bears when organisms or the environment are inadvertently exposed to them. The main reason for the lack of knowledge in this field is that there are very few experimental techniques that are able to provide information about the interactions and processes between nanoparticles and cell membranes on the small time and length scales of picoseconds and nanometers. This makes the design of experiments challenging and this is why in this case molecular simulations are a reasonable alternative to experiments. They can provide the information on the small scales in necessary detail to give a better understanding of the general nature of nanoparticle-membrane interactions and to investigate the origin of effects seen in experiments. In this work, coarse-grained molecular simulations were used to investigate the influence of small alkanethiolate-coated gold nanoparticles on the properties of lipid bilayers as a model for cell membranes. In the simulations three different lipid bilayers in water consisting of pure 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholin (POPC), pure 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1’-rac-glycerol) sodium salt (POPG) and a mixture of the two in molar ratio 1:1 were used. Both lipids are monounsaturated and identical in structure except for their head groups. POPC has a zwitterionic neutral head group, while POPG has a negative one. Additionally, two different gold nanoparticles, one with a positively and one with a negatively charged coating were used. The gold cores of both nanoparticles consisted of 79 gold atoms in the shape of a truncated octahedron with 38 alkanethiolate chains connected to the surface via their sulphur atoms. The gold core had a diameter of 1.2 nm while the diameter with the coating was around 4 nm. The MARTINI model was used for the simulations, which maps 4 heavy atoms into one single interaction site. This coarse-graining made the necessarily long time and length scales of the simulations accessible while preserving the relevant chemistry of the systems. All simulations featured a lipid bilayer in water in the middle of the simulation box with one or more nanoparticles placed in the water above the bilayer. Simulations of the bilayers in the absence of nanoparticles were used for model validation and as a reference for unperturbed membranes. Small systems with 10 × 10 nm bilayer patches with all six possible combinations of the two nanoparticles and three lipid bilayers were used to investigate nanoparticle attachment to the membranes. They showed that electrostatic interactions are guiding the nanoparticle attachment on the lipid bilayers and that there is a weaker and a stronger state of attachment. In the weaker state the head groups of the lipids are in contact with the ligand coating while they are in contact with the sulphur atoms and the gold core in the stronger binding state. The stronger binding state was reached via the metastable weaker one and only for the cationic nanoparticle on the two negatively charged bilayers (POPC/POPG and POPG). Bigger simulations with 40×40 nm membrane patches and four or 16 nanoparticles were used to investigate the influence of the nanoparticles on the structural properties of the bilayers. The nanoparticles perturbed the density profiles of the bilayers and reduce dlipid order in their close neighborhood, but only in the lipid layer facing them. The influence is stronger for the stronger binding states. The opposing lipid layer was almost unaffected. However, no influence of the nanoparticles on the area per lipid or the membrane thickness was observed. The calculation of radial distribution functions showed that the nanoparticles changed the local composition of the mixed bilayer due to a preference of POPG over POPC in contact with the nanoparticles. This demixing also causes the nanoparticles to form dynamic structures on the membrane surface, in which the average distance between the nanoparticles is reduced. It remains unclear if this is the clustering of nanoparticles on membranes observed in experiments. The simulations with 16 nanoparticles also showed that nanoparticles reduce the lateral motion of lipids in the bilayer globally and on a molecular level. This has previously been observed in experiments and a formation of lipid-rafts under the nanoparticles was proposed as a possible explanation. The simulations were able to show that lipids close to nanoparticles tend to bind to them for a longer time and therefore diffuse with a reduced rate. However, the raft-like domains around the nanoparticles are not rigid but instead dynamic structures with a steady exchange of lipids between the raft and its surrounding. Summarizing, the simulations were not only able to reproduce the experimental results and effects but also to give insights in the underlying processes that have not yet been observed in experiments.

Typ des Eintrags: Masterarbeit
Erschienen: 2016
Autor(en): Pfeiffer, Tobias
Titel: Molecular simulations of lipid bilayers in interactions with gold nanoparticles
Sprache: Englisch
Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract):

Gold nanoparticles are interesting candidates for medical applications like markers in imaging methods and targeted drug delivery, especially to cancer cells. Unfortunately, many gold nanoparticles have been found to be cytotoxic even for healthy cells. For an application in humans the origin and the factors of this cytotoxicity need to be well understood. In the recent years, many studies have been conducted on nanoparticle cytotoxicity and cellular nanoparticle uptake. Most of them focussed on the penetration of cell membranes and the nanoparticle uptake mechanism. However, there is not much known about the influence of nanoparticles on the properties of intact membranes even though this information is crucial for the assessment of the risk that the use of nanoparticles bears when organisms or the environment are inadvertently exposed to them. The main reason for the lack of knowledge in this field is that there are very few experimental techniques that are able to provide information about the interactions and processes between nanoparticles and cell membranes on the small time and length scales of picoseconds and nanometers. This makes the design of experiments challenging and this is why in this case molecular simulations are a reasonable alternative to experiments. They can provide the information on the small scales in necessary detail to give a better understanding of the general nature of nanoparticle-membrane interactions and to investigate the origin of effects seen in experiments. In this work, coarse-grained molecular simulations were used to investigate the influence of small alkanethiolate-coated gold nanoparticles on the properties of lipid bilayers as a model for cell membranes. In the simulations three different lipid bilayers in water consisting of pure 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholin (POPC), pure 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1’-rac-glycerol) sodium salt (POPG) and a mixture of the two in molar ratio 1:1 were used. Both lipids are monounsaturated and identical in structure except for their head groups. POPC has a zwitterionic neutral head group, while POPG has a negative one. Additionally, two different gold nanoparticles, one with a positively and one with a negatively charged coating were used. The gold cores of both nanoparticles consisted of 79 gold atoms in the shape of a truncated octahedron with 38 alkanethiolate chains connected to the surface via their sulphur atoms. The gold core had a diameter of 1.2 nm while the diameter with the coating was around 4 nm. The MARTINI model was used for the simulations, which maps 4 heavy atoms into one single interaction site. This coarse-graining made the necessarily long time and length scales of the simulations accessible while preserving the relevant chemistry of the systems. All simulations featured a lipid bilayer in water in the middle of the simulation box with one or more nanoparticles placed in the water above the bilayer. Simulations of the bilayers in the absence of nanoparticles were used for model validation and as a reference for unperturbed membranes. Small systems with 10 × 10 nm bilayer patches with all six possible combinations of the two nanoparticles and three lipid bilayers were used to investigate nanoparticle attachment to the membranes. They showed that electrostatic interactions are guiding the nanoparticle attachment on the lipid bilayers and that there is a weaker and a stronger state of attachment. In the weaker state the head groups of the lipids are in contact with the ligand coating while they are in contact with the sulphur atoms and the gold core in the stronger binding state. The stronger binding state was reached via the metastable weaker one and only for the cationic nanoparticle on the two negatively charged bilayers (POPC/POPG and POPG). Bigger simulations with 40×40 nm membrane patches and four or 16 nanoparticles were used to investigate the influence of the nanoparticles on the structural properties of the bilayers. The nanoparticles perturbed the density profiles of the bilayers and reduce dlipid order in their close neighborhood, but only in the lipid layer facing them. The influence is stronger for the stronger binding states. The opposing lipid layer was almost unaffected. However, no influence of the nanoparticles on the area per lipid or the membrane thickness was observed. The calculation of radial distribution functions showed that the nanoparticles changed the local composition of the mixed bilayer due to a preference of POPG over POPC in contact with the nanoparticles. This demixing also causes the nanoparticles to form dynamic structures on the membrane surface, in which the average distance between the nanoparticles is reduced. It remains unclear if this is the clustering of nanoparticles on membranes observed in experiments. The simulations with 16 nanoparticles also showed that nanoparticles reduce the lateral motion of lipids in the bilayer globally and on a molecular level. This has previously been observed in experiments and a formation of lipid-rafts under the nanoparticles was proposed as a possible explanation. The simulations were able to show that lipids close to nanoparticles tend to bind to them for a longer time and therefore diffuse with a reduced rate. However, the raft-like domains around the nanoparticles are not rigid but instead dynamic structures with a steady exchange of lipids between the raft and its surrounding. Summarizing, the simulations were not only able to reproduce the experimental results and effects but also to give insights in the underlying processes that have not yet been observed in experiments.

Ort: Darmstadt
Freie Schlagworte: Gold Nanoparticles molecular dynamics simulations lipid bilayers membranes POPC POPG
Fachbereich(e)/-gebiet(e): 07 Fachbereich Chemie > Fachgebiet Physikalische Chemie
07 Fachbereich Chemie > Computational Physical Chemistry
Hinterlegungsdatum: 10 Jul 2016 19:55
Offizielle URL: http://tuprints.ulb.tu-darmstadt.de/5512
URN: urn:nbn:de:tuda-tuprints-55128
Gutachter / Prüfer: van der Vegt, Prof. Nico ; Dalgicdir, Dr. Cahit
Datum der Begutachtung bzw. der mündlichen Prüfung / Verteidigung / mdl. Prüfung: 15 Juli 2016
Alternatives oder übersetztes Abstract:
AbstractSprache
Gold Nanopartikel sind vielversprechende Kandidaten für verschiedene Anwendungen in der Pharmazie. Dazu zählen deren Einschleusung in und der gezielte Transport von Medikamenten zu bestimmten Zellen, wie zum Beispiel Krebszellen, aber auch deren Nutzung als Kontrastmittel in bildgebenden Verfahren und der in vivo-Spektroskopie. Dabei macht man sich zu Nutze, dass metallische Nanopartikel in der Lage sind Zellmembranen zu durchdringen. Diese Eigenschaft macht Nanopartikel jedoch oft auch cytotoxisch für gesunde Zellen. Viele Studien der letzten Jahre haben deshalb die verschiedenen Faktoren in der Struktur der Nanopartikel untersucht, die für die Durchdringung oder Zerstörung von Zellmembranen relevant sind. Man hofft die Cytotoxizität der Nanoteilchen damit schon bei der Synthese kontrollieren zu können. Während der Mechanismus für die Aufnahme der Nanopartikel in die Zellen vielfach untersucht wurde, ist nur sehr wenig bekannt über die generellen Einflüsse, die Nanoteilchen auf Membranen haben können ohne sie zu durchdringen oder zu zerstören. Dieses Wissen ist jedoch dringend erforderlich, wenn Gold Nanopartikel medizinisch angewendet werden sollen, da man sonst nicht abschätzen kann, welches Risiko bei unbeabsichtigter Exposition für den Patienten, aber auch für andere Organismen und die Umwelt besteht. Einer der Hauptgründe für den Mangel an Untersuchungen in diesem Feld ist, dass es bisher nur wenige experimentelle Techniken gibt, mit denen sich die entscheidenden Prozesse auf Nanometer- und Picosekundenskalen untersuchen lassen. Eine gute Alternative dazu stellen molekulardynmaische Simulationen dar, die in der Lage sind auf kurzen Zeit und Längenskalen detaillierte Informationen zu liefern. In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurden deshalb Simulationen von verschiedenen Lipid-Doppelschichten, als Modell für Zellmembranen, in der Anwesenheit von Thiolalkan-ummantelten Gold Nanopartikeln durchgeführt und der Einfluss der Nanopartikel auf statische und dynamische Membraneigenschaften untersucht. Für die Simulationen wurde das MARTINI-Modell verwendet. Dieses ist ein vergröbertes Modell, in dem jeder Partikel vier schwere (nicht-Wasserstoff) Atome repräsentiert. Diese Vergröberung war notwendig um die verwendeten Systemgrößen und Simulationszeiten zu erreichen. Das MARTINI Model ist jedoch in der Lage, trotz des Verlustes atomistischer Details, die relevante Chemie der simulierten Systeme zu erhalten. Vor allem Lipide sind im MARTINI-Modell sehr gut parametrisiert und zeigen alle relevanten Phasen in Wasser. Dies war, zusammen mit der Tatsache, dass auch ein Modell für Gold Nanopartikel aus einem vorherigen Projekt bereits verfügbar war, der Hauptgrund für die Wahl dieses Modells. Die beiden verwendeten Lipide, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholin (POPC) und 1-palmitoyl-2- oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1’-rac-glycerol) (POPG), zweiteres verwendet als Natriumsalz, wurden durch jeweils 12 Partikel repräsentiert. Diese beiden einfach ungesättigten Lipide sind bis auf die Kopfgruppen identisch. POPC hat eine zwitterionische und damit neutrale Kopfgruppe, während POPG eine negative Ladung an der Kopfruppe aufweist. Die Nanopartikel haben einen Kern aus 79 Goldatomen in Form eines Oktaederstumpfes, an dessen Oberfläche 38 Dodecanylreste über jeweils ein Schwefelatom gebunden sind. Im MARTINI-Modell wird dies durch einen Partikel für jedes Gold- und Schwefelatom sowie durch einen Partikel für jede Vierergruppe von Kohlenstoffatomen dargestellt. Der Durchmesser des Goldkerns betrug 1,2 nm, der Gesamtdurchmesser mit Ummantelung ca. 4,0 nm. Um verschiedene Ladungen in der Ummantelung der Nanopartikel zu untersuchen, wurde das letzte Kohlenstoffteilchen in der Kette mit entweder einer positiven oder einer negativen Ladung versehen. Dies resultierte in einem Modell für einen kationischen und einem anioischen Nanopartikel. In den Simulationen wurden drei verschiedene Lipid-Doppelschichten , bestehend aus POPC, POPG und POPC/POPG im molekularen Verhältnis 1:1, in Wasser in unterschiedlichen Größen in Präsenz von einem oder mehreren Nanopartikeln untersucht. Simulationen von Membranen ohne Nanopartikel wurden zur Validierung des Membranmodells und als Referenz verwendet. Die Lipid-Doppelschicht wurde jeweils in der Mitte der Simulationsbox platziert, während die Nanopartikel in das Wasser darüber mit einem Abstand von 5–8 nm zur Membran gesetzt wurden. Die Referenzsysteme ohne Nanopartikel zeigten, dass die Struktur der Membranen in den Simulationen in Einklang mit experimentellen Messdaten war. Dies gilt vor allem für die Fläche pro Lipid, die Dicke der Doppel-Lipidschicht und das Dichteprofil. Außerdem wurde gezeigt, dass die Membranen, wie gewünscht, keine Oberflächenspannung haben. Das generelle Verhalten der Nanopartikel-Membran-Systeme wurde in kleinen Simulationen untersucht. Dabei wurde in einer 10 × 10 × 25 nm Simulationsbox ein Nanopartikel über einer 10 × 10 nm Lipidmembran platziert und das System für eine Gesamtzeit von 2 μs simuliert. Dabei wurden alle drei Lipidschichten mit jeweils einem positiv oder einem negativ geladenen Nanopartikel kombiniert. Die Simulationen der sechs verschiedenen Kombinationen zeigten, dass Coulomb-Wechselwirkungen entscheidend für die Herstellung eines stabilen Kontaktes zwischen Nanopartikel und Membran sind. So banden sich die kationischen Nanopartikel schnell an die Membranen mit negativer Oberflächenladung (POPG und POPC/POPG), während die anionischen Nanopartikel durch Abstoßungskräfte daran gehindert wurden. In Wechselwirkung mit der neutralen POPC Membran zeigten die Partikel wie erwartet identisches Verhalten. Des Weiteren 4 konnten zwei unterscheidlich starke Bindungszustände der Nanoteilchen an den Membranen beobachtet werden. Im schwächeren der beiden Zustände befinden sich die Kopfgruppen der Lipide in Kontakt mit den Kopfgruppen der Ummantelung der Nanopartikel, im stärkeren in Kontakt mit den Schwefelatomen und dem Goldkern. Der stärkere wurde in den Simulationen immer über den metastabilen schwächeren Bindungszustand erreicht. Simulationen größerer Systeme mit 40 × 40 nm Membranstücken mit jeweils vier oder 16 Nanoteilchen zeigten den Einfluss der Nanopartikel auf verschiedene Membraneigenschaften. So verändern Nanopartikel das Membranprofil in ihrer Umgebung, vor allem, wenn sie stark gebunden sind. Schwächere Bindungszustände beeinflussen das Membranprofil kaum. Des Weiteren konnte gezeigt werden, dass die Ordnung der Lipide in der Membran in der Umgebung der Nanopartikel stark abnimmt. Dies gilt jedoch nur für die Lipidschicht in direktem Kontakt mit den Nanoteilchen. Die gegenüberliegende Lipidschicht blieb in all ihren Eigenschaften nahezu unbeeinträchtigt. Auch konnte keinerlei Veränderung der Fläche pro Lipid, der Dicke der Lipid-Doppelschicht oder der Oberflächenspannung durch die Nanopartikel beobachtet werden. In der Simulation der gemischten Lipid-Doppelschicht wurde die lokale Zusammensetzung durch die Nanopartikel verändert. Dies konnte durch Berechnung der radialen Verteilung der unterschiedlichen Lipide um die Nanopartikel auf der Membran gezeigt werden. Diese lokale Entmischung der Lipide wird verursacht durch die höhere Affinität von POPG gegenüber POPC in Kontakt mit den positiv geladenen Nanoteilchen. Die induzierte lokale Entmischung sorgt dann wiederum dafür, dass sich die Nanoteilchen auf der gemischten Membran anders verhalten als auf den Membranen mit nur einer Komponente. Sind die Nanopartikel auf der POPG Membran noch nahezu gleichmäßig verteilt, so bilden sie dynamische Strukturen mit geringerem Abstand zwischen den Nanopartikeln auf der POPC/POPG Membran. Dies konnte durch Berechnung der radialen Verteilung von Nanopartikeln umeinander gezeigt werden. Ob es sich dabei um die in Experimenten beobachteten Nanopartikel-Cluster handelt, die sich auf Lipidmembranen bilden können, konnte nicht abschließend geklärt werden. Zuletzt wurde die laterale Diffusion von Lipiden in der Membran in der Anwesenheit von Nanopartikeln untersucht. Dies zeigte, dass Nanopartikel sowohl die globalen Diffusionsraten von Lipiden in der Membran reduzieren, als auch die Verteilung der molekularen Diffusionskoeffizienten beeinflussen. Dies ist zwar zuvor in Experimenten beobachtet worden, jedoch konnte in dieser Arbeit erstmals die Ursache dieses Effektes identifiziert werden. Die Beobachtung einzelner Lipide und Nanoteilchen in den Simulationen zeigte, dass Lipide über größere Zeitintervalle an einzelne Nanopartikel binden und zusammen mit diesem entlang der Membranoberfläche diffundieren. Diese Bindung ist jedoch reversibel und es gibt einen stetigen Austausch zwischen der an den Nanopartikel gebundenen Lipide mit der Umgebung. Dies bestätigt den aus den Experimenten vermuteten Mechanismus der Bildung von Lipid-Flößen unter den Nanoteilchen, zeigt jedoch auch, dass diese Strukturen nicht fest, sondern viel dynamischer sind als zuvor angenommen. Zusammenfassend konnte in dieser Arbeit gezeigt werden, dass die Simulationen gut zur Untersuchung der betrachteten Modellsysteme geeignet sind, da sie die experimentellen Ergebnisse reproduzieren und gleichzeitig neue Einblicke in die Wechselwirkungen und Prozesse zwischen Nanoteilchen und Lipidmembranen geben konnten.Deutsch
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

Eintrag anzeigen Eintrag anzeigen