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Robust Underestimation of Speed During Driving

Schütz, Alexander and Billino, Jutta and Bodrogi, Peter Zsolt and Polin, Dmitrij and Khanh, Tran Quoc and Gegenfurtner, Karl R. :
Robust Underestimation of Speed During Driving.
In: Perception, 44 (12) pp. 1356-1370. ISSN 0301-0066
[Article] , (2015)

Abstract

Traffic reports consistently identify speeding as a substantial source of accidents. Adequate driving speeds require reliable speed estimation; however, there is still a lack of understanding how speed perception is biased during driving. Therefore, we ran three experiments measuring speed estimation under controlled driving and lighting conditions. In the first experiment, participants had to produce target speeds as drivers or had to judge driven speed as passengers. Measurements were performed at daylight and at night. In the second experiment, participants were required to produce target speeds at dusk, under rapidly changing lighting conditions. In the third experiment, we let two cars approach and pass each other. Drivers were instructed to produce target speeds as well as to judge the speed of the oncoming vehicle. Here measurements were performed at daylight and at night, with full or dipped headlights. We found that passengers underestimated driven speed by about 20% and drivers went over the instructed speed by roughly the same amount. Interestingly, the underestimation of speed extended to oncoming cars. All of these effects were independent of lighting conditions. The consistent underestimation of speed could lead to potentially fatal situations where drivers go faster than intended and judge oncoming traffic to approach slower than it actually is.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2015
Creators: Schütz, Alexander and Billino, Jutta and Bodrogi, Peter Zsolt and Polin, Dmitrij and Khanh, Tran Quoc and Gegenfurtner, Karl R.
Title: Robust Underestimation of Speed During Driving
Language: English
Abstract:

Traffic reports consistently identify speeding as a substantial source of accidents. Adequate driving speeds require reliable speed estimation; however, there is still a lack of understanding how speed perception is biased during driving. Therefore, we ran three experiments measuring speed estimation under controlled driving and lighting conditions. In the first experiment, participants had to produce target speeds as drivers or had to judge driven speed as passengers. Measurements were performed at daylight and at night. In the second experiment, participants were required to produce target speeds at dusk, under rapidly changing lighting conditions. In the third experiment, we let two cars approach and pass each other. Drivers were instructed to produce target speeds as well as to judge the speed of the oncoming vehicle. Here measurements were performed at daylight and at night, with full or dipped headlights. We found that passengers underestimated driven speed by about 20% and drivers went over the instructed speed by roughly the same amount. Interestingly, the underestimation of speed extended to oncoming cars. All of these effects were independent of lighting conditions. The consistent underestimation of speed could lead to potentially fatal situations where drivers go faster than intended and judge oncoming traffic to approach slower than it actually is.

Journal or Publication Title: Perception
Volume: 44
Number: 12
Divisions: 18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology > Institute for Electromechanical Design > Light Technology
18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology > Institute for Electromechanical Design
18 Department of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology
Date Deposited: 03 May 2016 16:36
Additional Information:

doi 10.1177/0301006615599137

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