TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

Development of a Handbook for the Design and Assessment of BRT Stations

Chila Vidaurre, Eliana :
Development of a Handbook for the Design and Assessment of BRT Stations.
TU Darmstadt
[Masterarbeit], (2010)

Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract)

One definition of Bus Rapid Transit systems (BRT) says: it is a flexible, rubber-tired rapid-transit mode that combines stations, vehicles, services, running ways and intelligent transportation system elements into an integrated system with a strong positive identity that evokes a unique image. This definition underlines the importance of a system-wise concept emphasizing the high significance of BRT stations. Although there are very successful examples of efficient station designs worldwide, reaching a functional, operational and attractive design of stations is frequently underestimated. The consequences are manifold, ranging from capacity problems to non-acceptance of the transport system by the users.

With this background, the objective of this thesis is to represent the development of a globally applicable manual for the design and assessment of BRT stations in which a wide range of design alternatives are considered. This is an ambitious assignment since the station design process represents a complex interaction between various given conditions and stakeholders’ requirements to be fulfilled by the different station elements.

Firstly, the BRT station elements are identify and classified into eight functional categories from platforms and loading areas to maintenance considerations. The elements' main characteristics, essential functions and key concepts for their design are outlined. The analysis is supported by literature about the design of transit stations in general (bus, rail), planning guides and technical reports about BRT systems worldwide.

Secondly, the specific conditions constraining the design and assessment of BRT stations are identified and grouped into three categories: site specific conditions (e.g. climate, adjacent traffic lanes, other transport modes), the economic and legal framework (available funds, regulatory laws) and conditions arising from a BRT system perspective (as stations represent only one element of a complete BRT system, they must be designed to interact with other components such as running ways, buses and operation issues).

Thirdly, the stakeholders’ requirements are divided in a simplified manner into two principal groups: planers/operators’ requirements (service providers) and passengers’ requirements (service users). The planers’ requirements include costs and revenues, functional/operational aspects, and also institutional and coordination issues. According to adaptations made to the TCQSM and DIN EN 13816, the passengers’ requirements (or also called service requirements) for the service at stations are:

• Availability, which focuses on the question if a station is an option for a given trip regarding capacity, accessibility, and information.

• Comfort and convenience, related to how attractive it is to make a trip at a specific BRT station compared to make the same trip at other available station or with another public transport mode (e.g. private car). The service requirements to be considered under this item are safety and security, time saving, comfort, and customer service.

As the above described conditions and requirements are not always compatible on to another –as a fourth step– a Level of Service (LOS) based methodology for the design and assessment of BRT stations is applied and further developed. The LOS are value ranges (from “A” to “F”) that reflect the quality of service offered from the passenger’s point of view, but depends to a great extent on the operating decisions made by the planers/operators within the constraints of its budget and other specific given conditions. Quality of service also measures how successful a planer/operator is in providing service to the passengers with ridership implications.

The numerous stations’ elements are analyzed systematically and interlinked according to their functions to each of the service requirements. The resulting matrix provides an overview and serves as the fundamental guideline reference for the identification of the station elements and the requirements to be fulfilled.

In the respective literature, LOS value criteria are mostly given for the service requirement regarding capacity such as the LOS for waiting areas, walking ways and ramps, stairways and for fare collection and verification. LOS for the average pedestrian and bus delay times for the service regarding accessibility were also in the literature. Nevertheless, considering that the LOS represent the passengers point of view -and the passenger requirements are much broader than just capacity- the consideration of LOS for the rest of the service requirements such as accessibility, information, safety and security, time saving, comfort and customer service must also be integrated. For the missing service requirements, the LOS values are developed and consistently defined within this study:

• LOS for saturation of loading areas

• LOS for integration with other transport modes, accessibility for persons with reduced mobility, manual docking (interface platform-bus)

• LOS for information at stations, safety measures, security measures

• LOS for average buses delay time at a signalized intersection

• LOS for weather protection, features , customer service

Lessons learned from current BRT systems in operation with emphasis on problems at stations, and also passengers’ complains about stations as result of surveys, etc. were especially considered for the definition of the LOS values.

As a last step, an optimization and validation of the existing and newly defined LOS values was achieved by the application of the developed process and methodology at the BRT system “Metrobüs” in Istanbul. The current conditions at four stations were measured on site and later a comprehensive assessment in compliance with the LOS based methodology was realized. Within this process, significant improvement potentials against the originally prevailing LOS values were identify. The relations between the stations’ elements and the service requirements were also prioritized and validated. Suggested and assumed default values were corroborated with the field measurements.

By the application of the present manual at the design and assessment of BRT stations a systematic, transparent and fact- based approach forming the basis for subsequent working phases is given. Although, the detailed effects and results by applying this manual cannot be predicted in a quantitative manner, it can be assumed that by the application of this manual in the design and assessment of BRT stations, more passengers might be attracted to BRT because of the quality of service orientation (user-focus) and in turn more people might shift from private vehicles to public transportation.

Typ des Eintrags: Masterarbeit
Erschienen: 2010
Autor(en): Chila Vidaurre, Eliana
Titel: Development of a Handbook for the Design and Assessment of BRT Stations
Sprache: Englisch
Kurzbeschreibung (Abstract):

One definition of Bus Rapid Transit systems (BRT) says: it is a flexible, rubber-tired rapid-transit mode that combines stations, vehicles, services, running ways and intelligent transportation system elements into an integrated system with a strong positive identity that evokes a unique image. This definition underlines the importance of a system-wise concept emphasizing the high significance of BRT stations. Although there are very successful examples of efficient station designs worldwide, reaching a functional, operational and attractive design of stations is frequently underestimated. The consequences are manifold, ranging from capacity problems to non-acceptance of the transport system by the users.

With this background, the objective of this thesis is to represent the development of a globally applicable manual for the design and assessment of BRT stations in which a wide range of design alternatives are considered. This is an ambitious assignment since the station design process represents a complex interaction between various given conditions and stakeholders’ requirements to be fulfilled by the different station elements.

Firstly, the BRT station elements are identify and classified into eight functional categories from platforms and loading areas to maintenance considerations. The elements' main characteristics, essential functions and key concepts for their design are outlined. The analysis is supported by literature about the design of transit stations in general (bus, rail), planning guides and technical reports about BRT systems worldwide.

Secondly, the specific conditions constraining the design and assessment of BRT stations are identified and grouped into three categories: site specific conditions (e.g. climate, adjacent traffic lanes, other transport modes), the economic and legal framework (available funds, regulatory laws) and conditions arising from a BRT system perspective (as stations represent only one element of a complete BRT system, they must be designed to interact with other components such as running ways, buses and operation issues).

Thirdly, the stakeholders’ requirements are divided in a simplified manner into two principal groups: planers/operators’ requirements (service providers) and passengers’ requirements (service users). The planers’ requirements include costs and revenues, functional/operational aspects, and also institutional and coordination issues. According to adaptations made to the TCQSM and DIN EN 13816, the passengers’ requirements (or also called service requirements) for the service at stations are:

• Availability, which focuses on the question if a station is an option for a given trip regarding capacity, accessibility, and information.

• Comfort and convenience, related to how attractive it is to make a trip at a specific BRT station compared to make the same trip at other available station or with another public transport mode (e.g. private car). The service requirements to be considered under this item are safety and security, time saving, comfort, and customer service.

As the above described conditions and requirements are not always compatible on to another –as a fourth step– a Level of Service (LOS) based methodology for the design and assessment of BRT stations is applied and further developed. The LOS are value ranges (from “A” to “F”) that reflect the quality of service offered from the passenger’s point of view, but depends to a great extent on the operating decisions made by the planers/operators within the constraints of its budget and other specific given conditions. Quality of service also measures how successful a planer/operator is in providing service to the passengers with ridership implications.

The numerous stations’ elements are analyzed systematically and interlinked according to their functions to each of the service requirements. The resulting matrix provides an overview and serves as the fundamental guideline reference for the identification of the station elements and the requirements to be fulfilled.

In the respective literature, LOS value criteria are mostly given for the service requirement regarding capacity such as the LOS for waiting areas, walking ways and ramps, stairways and for fare collection and verification. LOS for the average pedestrian and bus delay times for the service regarding accessibility were also in the literature. Nevertheless, considering that the LOS represent the passengers point of view -and the passenger requirements are much broader than just capacity- the consideration of LOS for the rest of the service requirements such as accessibility, information, safety and security, time saving, comfort and customer service must also be integrated. For the missing service requirements, the LOS values are developed and consistently defined within this study:

• LOS for saturation of loading areas

• LOS for integration with other transport modes, accessibility for persons with reduced mobility, manual docking (interface platform-bus)

• LOS for information at stations, safety measures, security measures

• LOS for average buses delay time at a signalized intersection

• LOS for weather protection, features , customer service

Lessons learned from current BRT systems in operation with emphasis on problems at stations, and also passengers’ complains about stations as result of surveys, etc. were especially considered for the definition of the LOS values.

As a last step, an optimization and validation of the existing and newly defined LOS values was achieved by the application of the developed process and methodology at the BRT system “Metrobüs” in Istanbul. The current conditions at four stations were measured on site and later a comprehensive assessment in compliance with the LOS based methodology was realized. Within this process, significant improvement potentials against the originally prevailing LOS values were identify. The relations between the stations’ elements and the service requirements were also prioritized and validated. Suggested and assumed default values were corroborated with the field measurements.

By the application of the present manual at the design and assessment of BRT stations a systematic, transparent and fact- based approach forming the basis for subsequent working phases is given. Although, the detailed effects and results by applying this manual cannot be predicted in a quantitative manner, it can be assumed that by the application of this manual in the design and assessment of BRT stations, more passengers might be attracted to BRT because of the quality of service orientation (user-focus) and in turn more people might shift from private vehicles to public transportation.

Fachbereich(e)/-gebiet(e): Fachbereich Bau- und Umweltingenieurwissenschaften, Civil and Environmental Engineering > Institut für Verkehr > Fachgebiet Verkehrsplanung und Verkehrstechnik
Fachbereich Bau- und Umweltingenieurwissenschaften, Civil and Environmental Engineering > Institut für Verkehr
Fachbereich Bau- und Umweltingenieurwissenschaften, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Hinterlegungsdatum: 05 Apr 2016 11:58
Gutachter / Prüfer: Boltze, Prof. Dr. Manfred ; Mejia, Dipl. Ing Richard ; Hoffmann, Dipl. Ing Christine ; Fornauf, Dip.Wi.Ing Leif ; Kittler, Dipl. Ing Wolfgang
Alternatives oder übersetztes Abstract:
AbstractSprache
Eine Begriffserklärung für Bus Rapid Transit Systeme (BRT) besagt: BRT ist ein schnelles, flexibles, mit gummibereiften Fahrzeugen betriebenes Massenverkehrssystem, in welchem die Komponenten Haltestelle, Fahrspur, intelligente Verkehrssteuerung und Dienstleistung zu einem integrierten System zusammengefasst werden und somit eine überzeugende und einheitliche Identität sowie ein positives öffentliches Bild geschaffen wird. Diese Definition unterstreicht die Bedeutung des Systemansatzes und weist in besonderem Maße auf den hohen Stellenwert der BRT-Haltestellen hin. Obwohl es auf der Welt sehr erfolgreiche Beispiele für effiziente Haltestellenentwürfe gibt, wird die Zielvorgabe nach einem funktionalen, nutzerfreundlichen und attraktiven Design der Haltestellen häufig unterschätzt. Die Folgen sind vielfältig und reichen von Kapazitätsproblemen bis zur Ablehnung des Verkehrssystems durch die potentiellen Nutzer. Unter diesem Hintergrund wurde das Ziel dieser Masterarbeit als die Entwicklung eines weltweit anwendbaren Handbuchs für den Entwurf und die Bewertung von BRT-Haltestellen unter Berücksichtigung vielfältiger Entwurfsalternativen festgelegt. Es handelt sich hierbei um ein ambitioniertes Vorhaben, da der Haltestellen-Entwurfsprozess ein komplexes Zusammenspiel zwischen vorgegebenen Bedingungen und zahlreichen durch die Haltestellen-Elemente zu erfüllende Anforderungen durch verschiedene Interessensgruppen darstellt. In einer ersten Phase werden die BRT-Haltenstellen-Elemente identifiziert und nach acht funktionale Kategorien – von Plattformen und Ein-/Aussteigebereichen bis zu Betriebs- und Wartungsaspekten – klassifiziert. Die wesentlichen Merkmale der Elemente sowie deren Hauptfunktionen und für den Entwurf notwendige Schlüsselbegriffe werden herausgearbeitet. Die Analyse wird durch Auszüge aus der Literatur über die Gestaltung von Haltestellen und Umsteigestationen im allgemeinen (Bus, Bahn) sowie die Heranziehung von Planungsrichtlinien und technischen Berichten über weltweite BRT-Systeme ergänzt. In der zweiten Phase werden die spezifischen Bedingungen für die Gestaltung und Bewertung von BRT-Haltestellen identifiziert und in drei Kategorien zusammengefasst: orts- und verkehrssystemspezifische Bedingungen (z.B. Klima, angrenzende Fahrspuren, weitere Verkehrsträger), wirtschaftliche und rechtliche Rahmenbedingungen (verfügbare Mittel, gesetzliche Regelungen) und Bedingungen die aus einer BRT-System-Perspektive entspringen (Haltestellen bilden nur ein Element eines BRT-Systems und müssen folglich daraufhin ausgelegt werden, mit anderen Komponenten wie Fahrspuren, Bussen und betrieblichen Aspekten einwandfrei zu interagieren). In einer dritten Phase werden die Anforderungen der Beteiligten in vereinfachender Weise in zwei Hauptgruppen unterteilt: Anforderungen durch die Planer/Betreiber und Anforderungen durch die Fahrgäste (Nutzer des Angebotes). Die Anforderungen der Planer/Betreiber umfassen Betriebs- und Investitionskosten sowie Erlöse, funktionale und betriebliche Aspekte, aber auch institutionelle und koordinatorische Fragenstellungen. Gemäß den Angaben im TCQSM und der DIN EN 13816 werden die Anforderungen durch die Passagiere (die auch als Service-Anforderungen bezeichnet werden) an die Funktion der Haltestellen wie folgt dargestellt: • Verfügbarkeit – der Schwerpunkt liegt hier auf der Frage, ob ein Bahnhof eine attraktive Option für eine bestimmte Fahrt in Bezug auf Kapazität, Zugänglichkeit und Informationsangebot darstellt. • Komfort und Nutzerfreundlichkeit – zu fragen ist hier, wie attraktiv es ist, eine Fahrt zu einer bestimmten BRT- Haltestelle im Vergleich zur einer Fahrt zu einem anderen verfügbaren Bahnhof mit einem anderen Verkehrsmedium (z.B. auch Privatfahrzeug) zu realisieren. Die unter diesem Punkt zu erfüllenden Service- Anforderungen sind: Sicherheits, Zeitersparnis, Komfort sowie Kundenbetreuung. Da die oben beschriebenen Bedingungen und Anforderungen nicht immer miteinander vereinbar sind, wird einer vierten Phase eine Level of Service (LOS) basierte Methode für den Entwurf und die Beurteilung von BRT Haltestellen angewandt und weiterentwickelt. Die LOS stellen Wertebereiche (von "A" bis "F") dar, durch die die Qualität der Dienstleistung aus Sicht des Fahrgastes widergespiegelt wird. Diese Werte hängen jedoch zu einem großen Teil von den operativen Entscheidungen der Planer/Betreiber unter Berücksichtigung von Haushaltsvorgaben und andere spezifischen Bedingungen ab. Durch erzielte Fahrgastzahlen kann jedoch erkannt werden, wie erfolgreich die Planer/Betreiber in der Bereitstellung einer entsprechenden Servicequalität sind. Die zahlreichen Haltestellen-Elemente werden systematisch analysiert und gemäß ihrer Auswirkung auf die Serviceanforderungen verknüpft. Die resultierende Matrix gibt einen Überblick und dient als grundlegende Leitlinie für die Identifizierung der Haltestellenelemente und die zu erfüllenden Anforderungen. In der Fachliteratur werden LOS-Werte zumeist für die Service-Anforderungen im Zusammenhang mit der Kapazität angegeben (Wartebereiche, Zugangswege, Rampen, Treppen und Fahrkartenverkaufsstellen). Weiterhin wurden LOS über durchschnittliche Zugangszeiten von Fußgängern und Bus-Wartezeiten im Hinblick auf die Zugänglichkeit veröffentlicht. In Anbetracht der bei einem LOS-Ansatz einzunehmenden Nutzerperspektive wird – unter Berücksichtigung dass die eigentlichen Anforderungen der Passagiere weit über Aspekte wie die reine Transportleistung hinausgehen – eine Erweiterung der Konzeptes auf Themenbereiche wie Zugänglichkeit, Informationsangebot, Sicherheitsmaßnahmen und Sicherheitseinrichtungen, Zeitersparnis, Komfort und Kundenbetreuung notwendig. Für die bisher fehlenden Nutzeranforderungen werden im Rahmen der Masterarbeit folgende LOS-Werte entwickelt und schlüssig abgestuft definiert: • LOS für die Sättigung der Ein- und Aussteigeflächen (Plattformen) • LOS für die Integration mit anderen Verkehrsträgern, die Zugänglichkeit für Personen mit eingeschränkter Mobilität sowie Andock-Möglichkeit (Schnittstelle Plattform-Bus) • LOS zum Informationsangebot an Haltestellen, Sicherheitsmaßnahmen und Sicherheitseinrichtungen • LOS für die durchschnittliche Wartezeit von Bussen an signalisierten Kreuzungen • LOS zum Schutz vor Wettereinflüssen, Ausstattungsmerkmale, Nutzerfreundlichkeit und Kundenservice Erfahrungen aus aktuellen und in Betrieb befindlichen BRT-Systemen werden im Hinblick auf Schwierigkeiten an und mit Haltestellen sowie entsprechende Fahrgastbeschwerden als Ergebnis von Umfragen in besonderem Maße bei der Definition der LOS-Werte berücksichtigt. In einer abschließende Phase eine Optimierung und Validierung der bestehenden und neu definierten LOS-Werte durch die Anwendung der entwickelten Verfahren und Methoden an dem BRT-System "Metrobus" in Istanbul erreicht werden. Die derzeitigen Bedingungen an vier Haltestellen wurden vor Ort aufgenommen und nachfolgend einer umfassenden Bewertung nach den Prinzipien der LOS-Methodologie zugeführt. Im Rahmen dieses Prozesses konnten erhebliche Verbesserungspotenziale gegenüber den vorherrschenden LOS- Werten identifiziert werden. Die Abhängigkeiten zwischen den verschiedenen Haltestellen-Elementen und den Service-Anforderungen wurden priorisiert und gewichtet. Vorhandene und erarbeitete Vorgabewerte wurden durch die Feldmessungen bestätigt. Durch die Anwendung des vorliegenden Handbuchs im Zuge des Entwurfs und der Bewertung von BRT-Haltestellen wird eine systematische, transparente und tatsachenbasierte Vorgehensweise gewährleistet. Obwohl derzeit die genauen Auswirkungen und erzielbaren Ergebnisse durch die Anwendung dieses Handbuchs noch nicht in einer quantitativen Form angegeben werden können, kann davon ausgegangen werden, dass durch den LOS-basierten Entwurf und die nutzerfokussierte Bewertung von BRT-Haltestellen – und damit angestrebter verbesserter Qualität und steigender Dienstleistungsorientierung – sich mehr Menschen zum Umstieg von der Privatfahrzeugnutzung hin zum Obwohl derzeit die genauen umweltfreundlicheren öffentlichen Verkehrssystem BRT bewegen lassen.Deutsch
Export:

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

Eintrag anzeigen Eintrag anzeigen