TU Darmstadt / ULB / TUbiblio

The world's large lake basin's as denudation-accumulation systems and implications for their lifetimes

Hinderer, Matthias and Einsele, G. (2001):
The world's large lake basin's as denudation-accumulation systems and implications for their lifetimes.
In: Journal of paleolimnology, pp. 355-372, 26, [Article]

This is the latest version of this item.

Abstract

The mechanical denudation rates of 81 large lake basins (lake area > 500 km2) were determined from long-term river loads and erosion maps. Using the drainage area/lake area ratios the mean sedimentation rates of the lakes were calculated for a porosity of 0.3. The mean sedimentation rates of different lake types vary between 0.1 mm/a (glacial lakes, lowland) and 5.4 mm/a (mostly sag basin lakes). The calculated lifetimes of the lakes are based on the lake volumes and mean sedimentation rates, assuming steady-state conditions and solely clastic material. On average, glacial lakes in highlands and fault-related lakes show the shortest lifetimes (c. 70 ka), glacial lakes in lowlands and rift lakes have the longest lifetimes (c. 1 Ma). Some lakes remain unfilled for very long time spans due to rapid subsidence of their basin floors. The calculated lifetimes are compared with those derived from sediment core studies. Most core studies indicate lower mechanical sedimentation rates than the calculated ones because a major part of the incoming sediment is trapped in deltas. However, a number of lakes (e.g., the Great Lakes of North America) show the opposite tendency which is largely caused by extensive shoreline erosion and resuspension. The lifetimes of large glacial lakes often exceed the duration of interglacials. Hence, their lifetimes are restricted by glaciation and not by sediment infill. Rift lakes persist for long time periods which exceed the calculated lifetimes in some cases. Time-dependent subsidence, basin extension, as well as the impact of climate change are briefly described.

Item Type: Article
Erschienen: 2001
Creators: Hinderer, Matthias and Einsele, G.
Title: The world's large lake basin's as denudation-accumulation systems and implications for their lifetimes
Language: English
Abstract:

The mechanical denudation rates of 81 large lake basins (lake area > 500 km2) were determined from long-term river loads and erosion maps. Using the drainage area/lake area ratios the mean sedimentation rates of the lakes were calculated for a porosity of 0.3. The mean sedimentation rates of different lake types vary between 0.1 mm/a (glacial lakes, lowland) and 5.4 mm/a (mostly sag basin lakes). The calculated lifetimes of the lakes are based on the lake volumes and mean sedimentation rates, assuming steady-state conditions and solely clastic material. On average, glacial lakes in highlands and fault-related lakes show the shortest lifetimes (c. 70 ka), glacial lakes in lowlands and rift lakes have the longest lifetimes (c. 1 Ma). Some lakes remain unfilled for very long time spans due to rapid subsidence of their basin floors. The calculated lifetimes are compared with those derived from sediment core studies. Most core studies indicate lower mechanical sedimentation rates than the calculated ones because a major part of the incoming sediment is trapped in deltas. However, a number of lakes (e.g., the Great Lakes of North America) show the opposite tendency which is largely caused by extensive shoreline erosion and resuspension. The lifetimes of large glacial lakes often exceed the duration of interglacials. Hence, their lifetimes are restricted by glaciation and not by sediment infill. Rift lakes persist for long time periods which exceed the calculated lifetimes in some cases. Time-dependent subsidence, basin extension, as well as the impact of climate change are briefly described.

Journal or Publication Title: Journal of paleolimnology
Volume: 26
Divisions: 11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Earth Science
11 Department of Materials and Earth Sciences > Earth Science > Applied Sedimentary Geology
Date Deposited: 17 Jun 2015 06:57
License: [undefiniert]
Export:

Available Versions of this Item

  • The world's large lake basin's as denudation-accumulation systems and implications for their lifetimes. (deposited 17 Jun 2015 06:57) [Currently Displayed]

Optionen (nur für Redakteure)

View Item View Item